Will This Scratch Cake Work In The Wilton Giant Cupcake Pan?

Baking By Roxybc Updated 9 Apr 2010 , 5:46pm by rainbow_kisses

Roxybc Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 8:13pm
post #1 of 7

I have to practice making the Wilton Giant Cupcake for an upcoming wedding, but would also like to try out some new recipes at the same time. I came accross this recipe http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Strawberry-Cake-from-Scratch/Detail.aspx and it's gotten fairly good reviews about being dense, but really moist. Since it's got jello in it, I'm hoping that it will be stable enough to be baked in the giant cupcake pan. Does anyone have any experience baking cakes from scratch in the giant pan? Will they hold up alright? How should I adjust the cooking time because the base is so tall? Should I bake the top and bottom pieces seperately? Has anyone used a cake mix from scratch in the giant pan with success? Also, can anyone recommend another good recipe to use? If scratch ones don't work, what do you suggest?

6 replies
rainbow_kisses Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 11:07pm
post #2 of 7

I would suggest to try and use a heat core or heat core rod in the middle to make sure it cooks right through. A scratch recipe works just fine in the giant cupcake tin. no problem

Roxybc Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 11:47pm
post #3 of 7

Sorry, but what's a heat core rod? Are they expensive? If they have them in the UK, I'd have to order it online, and chances are they're double the price here than in the US, so I'd rather not have to do that if it's not totally necessary. The giant cupcake pan already cost me £30 ($50). I hate UK prices! icon_sad.gif

sadsmile Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 12:43am
post #4 of 7

I have used that pan twice for decorated cakes. Mine released well, but I really heavily greased and floured my pan and I also over filled the top part of the cupcake so it baked better with the other portion. I stuck a greased flower nail upside down in the bottom of the pan(the larger side/base of the cupcake) as the heating core to help that part cook faster in the middle. It worked brilliantly both times. I just trimmed off the huge hump from the bottom top portion(because the top is baked upside down) and the small hump from the top of the cupcake base and stacked them up.

I baked at 320°(not exactly sure if my oven is accurate) for as long as it took was around an hour. It needs to be a firm cake that doesn't give a lot of crumb issues on the sides. It's best to use a recipe you are familiar with.

rainbow_kisses Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:20pm
post #5 of 7

Like sadsmile said you could use a metal flower nail or a metal BBQ scewer that would help go all of the way through. Wilton sell heat core cones and they also sell a heat core rod with their doll pan and sitting teddy bear tin, I am not sure they sell it seperate. All available in the UK as that is where I am. The heat core 'thimble' costs around £10 in the UK available from any wilton stockist

Roxybc Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 3:36pm
post #6 of 7

Oh thanks very much for letting me know! £10 isn't too bad. I'm not sure what a flower needle is, but I'll have a look for it on one of my cake supply sites. How much cooking time will it cut off the cake?

rainbow_kisses Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 5:46pm
post #7 of 7

These don't knock any time off the cooking time really they just help to get the heat to the centre of larger cakes to ensure they cook in the centre

this is a flower nail http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/09-stainless-steel-icing-rose-flower-nail-for-cake_W0QQitemZ380217692687QQcmdZViewItem?rvr_id=&rvr_id=&cguid=ce46def51270a0e202314921ffd23b60 You need to ensure it is a metal one. or like I said previously if it is a tall cake you could use a stainless steel BBQ skewer

and this is a heat core http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?sku=417-6100

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