I Got My Website Up! Tell Me What You Think?

Business By kitty122000 Updated 9 Apr 2010 , 11:59am by Chasey

kitty122000 Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 6:38am
post #1 of 33

Check out my new site, I just finished it! I'm ready for some constructive criticism, please? I also haven't had anyone proof read yet, so if you see any grammar or spelling errors, please help me out? TIA!

www.cakeswithjaz.com

32 replies
mamawrobin Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 6:46am
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Nice thumbs_up.gif

Normita Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 7:13am
post #3 of 33

Everything looks good...but there is one thing that I would change if it were me....the description of the cruffles. You mention it as "cake crumbs". Which in reality they are, but as a customer "cake crumbs" don't sound too tasty. If you could describe them in a more "tasty" way I think it would sound more appealing... but again, that is my opinion icon_confused.gif

Other than that it looks nice icon_smile.gif

11cupcakes Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 9:01am
post #4 of 33

Looks good!

mommicakes Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 11:55am
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Nice job Jasmine, I really like the softness of the background color and the ivy in the upper corner.

crisseyann Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 12:16pm
post #6 of 33

Great site! I also agree with the description of the cruffles. One spelling error that just popped out at me (I wasn't really looking) on the FAQ page, first paragraph, tier is spelled teir incorrectly.

I love the whole look of it. Ya did good! icon_biggrin.gif

CWIL Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 12:22pm
post #7 of 33

Looks awesome! The only criticism I'd give is to be sure that you're consistent with how you type numbers, e.g., one layer, 1 layer. Great job!

Spuddysmom Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 12:41pm
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Great job! yeah, I suggest re-doing the whole cruffle description - "Cruffles are cake crumbs that have been mixed with a binder, (frosting, coffee creamer, liquor, etc.) to form a dough-like substance that is then formed into balls appx. one inch in diameter and dipped in chocolate, or white chocolate, candy coating."
Find a more appetizing way of describing them. "cake crumbs" and "dough-like substance" does not give a person a good visual. You can lose half the words easily in that paragraph.

marisanovy Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 12:52pm
post #9 of 33

Great website. Clean looking and easy to navigate.

I am not an expert on websites, but I tend to agree with the others about the cruffles.

Congratulations and good luck on your business!! icon_smile.gif

afunk Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 1:07pm
post #10 of 33

Jasmine, I sent you a pm. (if it worked)

kitty122000 Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 2:16pm
post #11 of 33

Thanks for all the feedback! I'll get those spelling errors fixed and work on a better description for the cruffles.

Anyone have anything else? Thanks again!

Lcubed82 Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 2:45pm
post #12 of 33

Two thoughts:
1. Pricing for cruffles- you have a price per dozen, and single, with a min order of a dozen. Is the single price for additionals?

2. On your prices page, I notice several times you say "my cakes". Now, I certainly understand pride, ownership of a job well done, etc., but as the customer I want my own cake, not yours! Using something like "your cake" or "your custom cake" might draw the customer in more. (Not a big deal- your statements are certainly clear and grammatically correct.)

BTW your cakes look great! The website is also clear and uncluttered. Good luck!

kitty122000 Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 3:08pm
post #13 of 33
Quote:
Quote:

1. Pricing for cruffles- you have a price per dozen, and single, with a min order of a dozen. Is the single price for additionals?

2. On your prices page, I notice several times you say "my cakes". Now, I certainly understand pride, ownership of a job well done, etc., but as the customer I want my own cake, not yours! Using something like "your cake" or "your custom cake" might draw the customer in more. (Not a big deal- your statements are certainly clear and grammatically correct.)




1. Yes, They are for additions, I've had people order 18 before. do you think there is a better way to word it?

2. You have a great point! I'll make some changes on that!

thanks!

cakesarge Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 3:19pm
post #14 of 33

Looiks great. Some recommended changes:
1. Ensure your fonts are consistant. On Menu & Pricing page, the word Pricing is much bigger than the rest of the categories.
2. In your "filling" category, some are capitalized...some are not.
3. Frostings: Put a period after the word "fondant" All of my cakes are covered with fondant.
4. Is "Dream" capitalized for any particular reason under Cake Flavors?
5. Last sentance in the first answer of your FAQ should actually be 3 sentances.

Congrats! Great website!

Lcubed82 Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 3:37pm
post #15 of 33

"They are for additions, I've had people order 18 before"

Here is one company's website- great description of product, and pricing plan. http://www.cakeballs.com/

Here is someone else's pricing: Cake balls are sold by the dozen with a two (2) dozen minimum per order. 2 dozen - $22 Each additional dozen - $11

Maybe you could have the price per dozen with add-on 1/2 dozen pricing. "$$/dozen (min one dozen). 1/2 dozen add-ons available at $$ "

Tracy7953 Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 3:40pm
post #16 of 33

Jasmine I really like your site - very clean and crisp. The only thing that would suggest is to retake the photo of you with your mixer. You have such a pretty face, maybe add a finished cake in the background instead of a dark wall. Congrats!

kitty122000 Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 4:37pm
post #17 of 33

Thanks! I was thinking about this picture, but It's a Licensed character cake I made for my son.

I kept my licensed character cakes off the site to avoid those requests. I wanted to put a copyright disclaimer on the site, but I'm not sure where to put it.
LL

Sagebrush Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 4:45pm
post #18 of 33

From your website:

" A standard serving is 8 cubic inches, single layer 2" x 2", or double layer 1"x 2"."

Even though I know what you're getting at, I find the wording a bit confusing sounding, and I think non-cakers might a hard time understanding what you're trying to get across. I would be a little more explicit and change it to say something like:

"A standard serving is 8 cubic inches. For a single 2" layer cake, that would typically be 2"x2"x2"; for a double layer, 4" tall tier, that would typically be 1"x2"x4".

HTH

Butterpatty Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 5:08pm
post #19 of 33

"Cruffles are a mixture of cake and a binder, (frosting, coffee creamer, liquor, etc.) that is formed into balls, and dipped in chocolate, or white chocolate, candy coating. They can be made to match any design for wedding favors, bridal showers, baby showers, or just to munch on! Cake pops are cruffles on a stick, individually wrapped and tied closed with a ribbon. Check the cruffles gallery for examples of both"

How about something along the lines of: Cruffles are a delicious bite size bit of cake that can be flavored in various ways and then are dipped in chocolate. Cruffle flavors and designs can be made to match any occasion. They can also be made into cake pops (cruffles on a stick!) that are individually wrapped and arranged. Check the cruffle gallery for examples of both.

kitty122000 Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 5:17pm
post #20 of 33

good suggestions! thanks!

TexasSugar Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 5:30pm
post #21 of 33

I agree with the cruffles, I would leave out the word binder. Personally if I read that and didn't know what they were I'd think they were just mushed up cake and why would I want to buy that.

I'd say something like they are a cross between a cake and a truffle (exaplains the name) and skip over to the made to match part.

I'd also price them by the dozen and only sell dozens, not half dozens, if it were me. Just like I would price cupcakes by the dozen and sell them in a dozen. icon_smile.gif

kitty122000 Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 5:41pm
post #22 of 33

I made some changes to the menu and pricing page, does that sound better?

Chasey Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 5:48pm
post #23 of 33

Looks nice, you're getting there with all these helpful tweaks!

Two things came to my mind as I read the menu page:

1. Can I get chocolate buttercream as a filling? Only whipped ganache for chocolate lovers?

Buttercream would be sooo easy to offer lots of flavors in if you wanted to expand that filling list, don't you think? Lemon, mocha, strawberry, cheesecake, etc. can be created with a few drops of flavoring!

2. What if I don't like fondant? Could I just have a buttercream iced cake? If so, could you list my choices? (similar to the buttercream fillings.) If fondant is the only thing you want to use, could you tell me a little about what kind of fondant or what it tastes like or if it can be flavored?

Also, I would want to know what kind of ingredients are in the icing. If it's 100% buttercream and not shortening...that would be a selling point to me.

Those are my thoughts.

Good job and good luck!!

ETA: I just looked again and this line caught my eye:

Additional flavor requests are accepted with an additional fee

How about saying: Gourmet flavors upon request with an additional fee

One last thing. The statement "your cake will be covered in fondant." Period. icon_lol.gif How about selling the smooth, professional look of fondant or something along those lines? Not everyone reading your site will know as much as you do, of course! icon_smile.gif

kitty122000 Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 6:01pm
post #24 of 33
Quote:
Quote:

1. Can I get chocolate buttercream as a filling? Only whipped ganache for chocolate lovers?

Buttercream would be sooo easy to offer lots of flavors in if you wanted to expand that filling list, don't you think? Lemon, mocha, strawberry, cheesecake, etc. can be created with a few drops of flavoring!

2. What if I don't like fondant? Could I just have a buttercream iced cake? If so, could you list my choices? (similar to the buttercream fillings.) If fondant is the only thing you want to use, could you tell me a little about what kind of fondant or what it tastes like or if it can be flavored?

Also, I would want to know what kind of ingredients are in the icing. If it's 100% buttercream and not shortening...that would be a selling point to me.




1. chocolate buttercream? I dont have a recipe for that! I figured the whipped ganache was a good enough chocolate option... hmm.. I'll have to think about that one.
as for the flavored buttercream, my concern with that is I live in a really small area and would have to order flavored oils online or drive two hours to get them. I'd hate for someone to order a cake and I dont have the flavoring available for the frosting. of course I could just make sure to keep them in stock. something else to think about I suppose.

2. I am not comfortable enough in my buttercream skills to offer a non-fondant cake. so at this point I would rather not have that as an option.


I use indydebi's crisco based buttercream, is it still a selling point if I use shortening?


Quote:
Quote:

How about saying: Gourmet flavors upon request with an additional fee



Will this lead to needing a list of gourmet flavors that can be requested?

Chasey Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 6:09pm
post #25 of 33

If I were starting a business, I would preorder some popular oils and keep them on hand. You'll use them!

There are lots of chocolate BC recipes that have been reviewed. Search the recipe section, make half a batch and taste test! icon_biggrin.gif

I wouldn't mention the crisco based frosting since it's not all butter. icon_wink.gif

The use of the word Gourmet just replaces your word "Additional" so regardless, I think you'll want to include a short list of what you would consider offering. Perhaps Red Velvet, Carrot Cake, Pound cake...that gives an idea as to what you can provide.

Bluehue Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 6:39pm
post #26 of 33

Q: How do I pay you?
A: I accept cash, checks, and payments through paypal via the web.



Just one querie -
The word check in the above sentance - is that correct?
Perhaps we spell it differently over here in Australia - as in cheque

We have two different spellings .....

Thats a nice check shirt
Can i pay you by cheque?


Sorry if you use the word *check* for both referances.

Good web site - soothing colours - i wish you every success.


Bluehue.

Chasey Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 6:47pm
post #27 of 33

Bluehue, Americans use check for both and often you will see Canadians using cheque in reference to payment.

rosiecast Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 6:52pm
post #28 of 33

HI, I also noticed the chocolate ganache and I can tell you that some people (kids especially do not seem to like it) Maybe is my recipe, but I know that if I'm doing cupcakes/cake for a kids birthday I use buttercream.

Also, I agree with describing what fondant is and I think you should get some practice with buttercream, because I know some people just don't like it. I don't remember but there's a CCr that has fondant listed as her frosting of choice, but she also explains why "appearance" and also tells customers that if they prefer buttercream she'll provide that instead.

it's a great website and I wish you all the luck. Great cakes!!!

Bluehue Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 6:54pm
post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chasey

Bluehue, Americans use check for both and often you will see Canadians using cheque in reference to payment.




thumbs_up.gif - just thought i would querie it, as it is the second time i have seen it spelt that way today/tonight when referring to money matters.

Thankyou Chasey


Bluehue.

rosiecast Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 6:56pm
post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty122000

Thanks! I was thinking about this picture, but It's a Licensed character cake I made for my son.

I kept my licensed character cakes off the site to avoid those requests. I wanted to put a copyright disclaimer on the site, but I'm not sure where to put it.




Hi Kitty, If you check out Sharon Zambito's website she has copyrighted characters and she has a disclaimer on her site. Maybe you want to take a look at it. Her CC name is sugarshack.

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