Dessert Cake Slices

Business By SpudCake Updated 9 Apr 2010 , 2:14am by SpudCake

SpudCake Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 12:08am
post #1 of 19

I will be opening my new storefront in early May. I plan to have dessert cakes to be purchased by the slice in store. I use the Wilton chart now for my pricing for my "regular" order cakes. I am thinking of slicing the in-store cakes a little larger and charging more per slice for them. Anyone else do this? Any ideas or comments? I will have sit down with drinks also. Thanks for any input.

Joanne usaribbon.gif

18 replies
3LittleBeesCookies Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 12:16am
post #2 of 19

[quote="SpudCake"]I will be opening my new storefront in early May. I plan to have dessert cakes to be purchased by the slice in store. I use the Wilton chart now for my pricing for my "regular" order cakes. I am thinking of slicing the in-store cakes a little larger and charging more per slice for them. Anyone else do this? Any ideas or comments? I will have sit down with drinks also. Thanks for any input.

curious... what is the wilton chart?

pastryjen Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 12:19am
post #3 of 19

I'd find out what a slice of dessert cake costs at the restaurants nearby and price accordly! icon_redface.gif Accordingly!

prterrell Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 2:42am
post #4 of 19

An 8" round cake, sliced is usually sliced into 8 wedges (at least that's what we did at the Publix bakery when preparing the "cake by the slice"). Depending on the kind of cake (gourmet or not) you should be able to charge around $5-$7 or so per slice.

HTH

JanH Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 4:07am
post #5 of 19

My local custom cake shop also serves lunch and cake slices to go.

The cake slices are 1x4x4 and they sell for $5.00 slice (any flavor).

HTH

SugarFrosted Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 5:42am
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3LittleBeesCookies


curious... what is the wilton chart?




http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

3LittleBeesCookies Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 1:20pm
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarFrosted

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3LittleBeesCookies


curious... what is the wilton chart?



http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm




Thanks!

3LittleBeesCookies Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 1:23pm
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpudCake

I will be opening my new storefront in early May. I plan to have dessert cakes to be purchased by the slice in store. I use the Wilton chart now for my pricing for my "regular" order cakes. I am thinking of slicing the in-store cakes a little larger and charging more per slice for them. Anyone else do this? Any ideas or comments? I will have sit down with drinks also. Thanks for any input.

Joanne usaribbon.gif




SpudCake, how much are you charging for an entire cake? I'm wondering what people charge for cakes that are not decorated, such as a plain carrot cake just frosted with cream cheese. I checked out the Wilton Chart and that is the standard for wedding and decorated cakes, correct?

Anybody else can chime in here, also. Thanks for helping the newbie. (I don't mean to take this over. I'm just inquisitive. icon_biggrin.gif )

TexasSugar Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 1:38pm
post #9 of 19

If I were cutting the cake in cessert sizes like that, I would do a wedge cut instead of the squares. So I would say do an 8in cake and cut it in to 12 slices.

I think off the top of my head the 8in servings 24, so if you normally charge $2.50 a serving then I would charge $5 a serving for the wedge, since they are getting twice as much cake.

3littlebees, personally I wouldn't charge less for a carrot cake with cream cheese icing because in the long run you are usually spending more on the ingredients. I would do a nice border on it, and you can always do some simple decoration or cover the sides in chopped nuts to 'dress it up.'

jenng1482 Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 1:41pm
post #10 of 19

I recently stopped a successful cake shop in a town about 150 miles for me (we dont have any near by). For their cake by the slice they had 4-5" high, i would estimate about 6" across rectangle cakes. There were 2 layers of cake and 1 layer of filling. I'm sure i'm not describing these well but they were long rectangles. It was so easy for them to slice off a piece at the end with the rest staying very much intact. Only one surface to cover to avoid it drying out.

SpudCake Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 5:16pm
post #11 of 19

TexasSugar, that is exactly what I was thinking of doing. An 8" cut into 12 slices. I normally call an 8 inch round 20 servings but for by the slice size I thought about cutting it into 12 instead. Guess I wasn't too far off track.

Joanne usaribbon.gif

TexasSugar Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 5:24pm
post #12 of 19

I think the wedge vs squares is a nice way have them different. Other wise you may get the why am I paying 50% more for this slice than a cake kind of questions.

Just figure out what your price per cake is using the 8in. If you normally charge $3 a serving for it, then it would be $60. Take that and divide it by the number of slices you cut. So the wedge cut would be $5 a serving.

itsacake Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 6:38pm
post #13 of 19

Are you putting this cake on a plate and serving it at a table? If so, remember you had to buy those plates and if they are not disposable you will have to wash the plate and fork or pay someone to do it. Also, if you have a place to sit, you are paying rent on that space. It isn't just the price of the cake you have to consider. Don't forget your overhead.

On the other hand, if you just give them the single serving in wax paper and a bag and they go away, it is just the time it took to serve them, which may be less cost to you. There still is the cost of stopping work on an expensive wedding cake so you can sell a $5.00 piece if cake, but that may be less of an issue, unless you are paying a counter person and then you still have to factor that in.

SpudCake Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 7:33pm
post #14 of 19

Yeah I am working on figuring that in. That is why I will charge more per serving when sold individually, even though that slice will be slightly larger I will still make more money on the cake that is sold by the slice. It will be a learning curve for sure.

Joanne usaribbon.gif

SugarFrosted Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 10:10pm
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenng1482

I recently stopped a successful cake shop in a town about 150 miles for me (we dont have any near by). For their cake by the slice they had 4-5" high, i would estimate about 6" across rectangle cakes. There were 2 layers of cake and 1 layer of filling. I'm sure i'm not describing these well but they were long rectangles. It was so easy for them to slice off a piece at the end with the rest staying very much intact. Only one surface to cover to avoid it drying out.



You could get that with a 9x13/quarter sheet cut in 1/2 lengthwise and those two halves stacked to make a long rectangle, approx 5" wide x 13" long x 4" high. That would make a lot of sense for cutting single servings from a plain iced cake.

Kitagrl Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 10:33pm
post #16 of 19

I'd cut them in wedges, I think that looks lovely plated as a "dessert". I think rectangles look more "catered".

Maybe you can figure how much you need to profit off the entire cake...and then after that decide how many slices you need to cut it into, and how much to price them.

I'm working with a restaurant right now to possibly sell them dessert cakes...its hard to price my own work with enough profit but that they can raise it even more to cover THEIR overhead and have both of us happy. haha. I think it will work out okay though! I'll be making 9" cakes and they will be slicing them into 10 pieces....possibly 12 I guess, that's up to them. I suggested 10.

3LittleBeesCookies Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 11:58pm
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

If I were cutting the cake in cessert sizes like that, I would do a wedge cut instead of the squares. So I would say do an 8in cake and cut it in to 12 slices.

I think off the top of my head the 8in servings 24, so if you normally charge $2.50 a serving then I would charge $5 a serving for the wedge, since they are getting twice as much cake.

3littlebees, personally I wouldn't charge less for a carrot cake with cream cheese icing because in the long run you are usually spending more on the ingredients. I would do a nice border on it, and you can always do some simple decoration or cover the sides in chopped nuts to 'dress it up.'




Thanks. Pricing can be challenging!

SpudCake Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 2:10am
post #18 of 19

I do plan to cut into wedges. I think that looks much nicer. My cake prices vary from just standard flavors starting at $40 for 8 inch and up for carrot, etc.

Joanne usaribbon.gif

SpudCake Posted 9 Apr 2010 , 2:14am
post #19 of 19

That being said my $40 (8inch) I call 20 servings as a decorated whole cake but as a cut cake, cut into 12 slices I should be able to make $4-$5 a serving and make about $20 more per cake when sold by the slice. Kind of like when you buy in bulk it is cheaper but by the slice it will cost you more.

Joanne usaribbon.gif

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