Beginner-Sort-Of Wedding Cake Questions

Decorating By Megs1025 Updated 26 Apr 2010 , 1:20am by leily

Megs1025 Posted 7 Apr 2010 , 8:56pm
post #1 of 7

I've offered to do a few wedding cakes this summer for gifts to my friends/family. I've done a few simple wedding cakes at work (2 tier, stacked, not delivered) and I'm thinking these are going to be more extravagant.

The first cake -beginning of July- is for ~180 people. They'd like a 3 or 4 tiered stacked square cake.

The second cake -end of July- is for ~280 people. She wants this cake to be as tall as possible, square, and stacked. It's going to be frosted in buttercream and have ribbon around the bottom of each tier. I'm also the maid of honor in this wedding so any short cuts I can take will be great.

1. The cakes I've made haven't been too heavy so I've just used a few cardboard boards. What do I use as a base for a heavier cake? Not to mention this will be on display so I want it to be pretty.

2. I won't be delivering the first cake, should I box it for them? Do they make boxes this big???

3. For the tall cake, I've mentioned using styrofoam to get the tall effect she wants and she's ok with that. We can have sheet cakes in the back too if I want. How many tiers should be styrofoam? What do I use to secure them to one another? Can I do these a week in advance and still have them look the same as the "real" tiers. Is there a certain kind of styrofoam that works best for this?

4. I'll also be delivering the tall cake and I don't have a huge car. Do I take the tiers separately and assemble at the venue?

I'm kind of nervous, these people think I'm great and have a lot of trust in me and I don't want to ruin their day!!!! Any thoughts/comments/help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
Megan

6 replies
leah_s Posted 7 Apr 2010 , 9:36pm
post #2 of 7

You can get boxes from Bakery Crafts, but you need a tax ID to set up an account. I'm sure someone else sells them though.

For support , use SPS. It will take a lot of headaches out of this for you.

Round will ALWAYS result in a taller overall cake than squares. it's just geometry.

I won't do sheet cakes, but I will do kitchen cakes. Big difference.

eccl1-12 Posted 7 Apr 2010 , 11:50pm
post #3 of 7

I recommend using foamcore pieces (regular thickness) cut to size for cake boards, and for the bases, you can get 1/2 inch thick foamcore. If you are worried about the weight, and especially for the cake that you are not delivering, I would glue or tape together two of the 1/2 inch ones for extra strength. Also, stick a sharpened dowel down through all the tiers, in addition to your individual tier supports. This will help with overall stability. The sharpened dowel will stick fairly easily through the foamcore between the tiers and into the one at the bottom whereas other types of boards and bases could be a bit more challenging. I have found the foamcore and dowels both at Michaels, but not in the cake decorating section. HTH

sadsmile Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 7:52pm
post #4 of 7
Quote:
Quote:

Round will ALWAYS result in a taller overall cake than squares. it's just geometry.




Say what? It is about how much better it takes to fill a pan.
A round 8" cake pan is smaller then a square 8" cake pan(that is the geometry part leah_s) and would take less better, but if you fill both pans up to the right amount for each pan, then the cakes would bake the same height, even though the square pan used more batter.

The height of your layers depends on how much batter is used and how high that recipe rises while baking, and sometimes how the pan is prepared...but it ain't got nuttin to do with the shape of the pan. icon_wink.gif

It can also be affected by the height of the pan, but not the shape.

Megs1025 Posted 25 Apr 2010 , 10:14pm
post #5 of 7

what's a kitchen cake?

leily Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 1:18am
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Megs1025

what's a kitchen cake?




A kitchen cake is a rectangle cake that is 4" high and is filled and iced like the wedding cake, but without the decorations. So when cut the guest can't tell if it came from the wedding cake or from another cake

leily Posted 26 Apr 2010 , 1:20am
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by sadsmile

Quote:
Quote:

Round will ALWAYS result in a taller overall cake than squares. it's just geometry.



Say what? It is about how much better it takes to fill a pan.
A round 8" cake pan is smaller then a square 8" cake pan(that is the geometry part leah_s) and would take less better, but if you fill both pans up to the right amount for each pan, then the cakes would bake the same height, even though the square pan used more batter.

The height of your layers depends on how much batter is used and how high that recipe rises while baking, and sometimes how the pan is prepared...but it ain't got nuttin to do with the shape of the pan. icon_wink.gif

It can also be affected by the height of the pan, but not the shape.




I think what the Leah is talking about is the appearence. Yes when taking an actual tape measure to the cakes they are going to be the same height. But it's an optical illusion that the round cake is taller.

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