Roses Won Stay....or Stick!!!

Decorating By tirechic Updated 8 May 2010 , 1:41pm by LindaF144a

tirechic Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 2:49pm
post #1 of 23

Help!! I am making a dummy cake, have design in my head and on paper. Make b/c roses place on side of cake......yeah right, they wont stick and if they do they fall off later. I have put a little mound where the rose would go and that helped a little but then, later, they are on the cake board or table leaving a trail of color all the way down the side of the cake. What am I doing wrong. I had this trouble with the pink and white cake in my photos, but thought I had fixed the problem. Is it because I want them on the side of the cake and not on a "ledge"? Any input would be helpful.....very frustrated at this point and am thinking of just scaping the design and doing something different. Thanks in advance.

22 replies
tirechic Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 3:34pm
post #2 of 23

Just giving myself a bump.

msulli10 Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 3:42pm
post #3 of 23

Try using melted chocolate. Hold it in place for a few seconds while the chocolate sets up.

Chasey Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 3:42pm
post #4 of 23

That must be frustrating! I haven't tried to attach roses to the side of a cake since I am very new to this. Just wondering if royal icing would do the trick to adhere them for delivery?

If it was a family cake, I would consider using toothpicks to secure them. I just don't know how I would feel about giving away a cake full of toothpicks though! icon_surprised.gif

Hopefully someone will have the magic answer!

tirechic Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 3:51pm
post #5 of 23

Well, this will be for future venue orders, so I wanted them to be b/c, everyone wants to eat the roses, hope someone has the magic too.

tirechic Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 5:06pm
post #6 of 23

bump again, anyone?

tamyarm Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 5:18pm
post #7 of 23

i don't have any advice or help....but it's a small world, my dad used to live in midlothian. we still go through there on our way to glen rose from wills point...

2SchnauzerLady Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 5:34pm
post #8 of 23

Have you seen a cake like the one you are attempting in the forums? If so, you should pm the designer and ask them how they did it. I haven't done it myself.

tirechic Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 6:52pm
post #9 of 23

Funny, I have been thru Wills Point many times, and no I have not seen a similar pic yet, I WILL figure this out, lol.....I will win, its only sugar dangit!!!

KHalstead Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 8:27pm
post #10 of 23

I"d be tempted to make them out of royal and pop a toothpick into the bottom of each one before it's completely dried and then stabe em' right into the dummy cake!

FACSlady Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 8:43pm
post #11 of 23

Are you covering the cake in fondant or BC?

indydebi Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 9:56pm
post #12 of 23

I sent you a PM with this photo and more detail but just for gen'l info in case this thread gets searched later, the BC roses s/b air dried (overnight is best) to get rid of the moisture in the rose which will make them much lighter. Start building the cascade at the bottom of the cake and work up ... the lower roses will help support and hold the upper roses in place. I pipe the green leaves 'n such on the cake and use the green icing as part of the 'glue' to hold the dried roses in place.

This is a dummy cake with cascading BC roses:
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1496730

rcolson13 Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 11:25pm
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I sent you a PM with this photo and more detail but just for gen'l info in case this thread gets searched later, the BC roses s/b air dried (overnight is best) to get rid of the moisture in the rose which will make them much lighter. Start building the cascade at the bottom of the cake and work up ... the lower roses will help support and hold the upper roses in place. I pipe the green leaves 'n such on the cake and use the green icing as part of the 'glue' to hold the dried roses in place.

This is a dummy cake with cascading BC roses:
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1496730




Will you pretty please PM me the detailed directions too?

indydebi Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 11:39pm
post #14 of 23

here's the whole thing. Easier to just copy-n-paste it here in case others need the details! thumbs_up.gif
-----------------------------------
Here's a dummy cake I did with cascading roses: http://cakecentral.com/modules.....id=1496730

First I let them air dry. Overnight is preferred; 6 hrs or so will work (depending on the original icing consistency). If you can do overnight drying, go that route. I just placed them on a baking sheet and left them on the counter. In the morning they were good to go!

Air drying removes the moisture from the rose. Moisture is VERY heavy. When you allow this water to evaporate, you have a super light sugar flower to play with. Freezing the rose just temporarily solidifies the moisture and the fat in the rose ... when it comes to room temp, it will "melt" and you're back to square one. Air dry. Debi's Gospel.

I start at the bottom of the cake and work up. This way, the bottom roses act as a support for the upper roses. Notice How I also intermingled the large and small roses ... the big roses give the "ooomph!" look we want, while the small roses fill in the blanks, so to speak, and they aren't as heavy on the side of the cake. (The big roses aren't heavy, either, since they are air dried, but you see what I mean.)

I pipe the leaves and green vines on the cake first. This icing is soft and moist and acts as the glue to hold the air-dried rose in place. If needed, add a dollop of icing on the backside of the air-dried rose to adhere it.

On the one hand, I say "there's no trick to it" ... on the other hand, I say, "Now that you know the tricks to it.....!"

Let me know if I overlooked anything ... I'm happy to help in any way I can.

madgeowens Posted 2 Apr 2010 , 12:26am
post #15 of 23

I refrigerate my roses and then affix with toothpicks too the side, and a dab of bc.

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1328113

rcolson13 Posted 2 Apr 2010 , 2:30am
post #16 of 23

Thank you Debi! Usually I add the greenery after roses because I'm not positive where everything is going. How do you figure out how where to pipe your greener? Do you plan out where every small and big rose will be?

indydebi Posted 2 Apr 2010 , 4:41am
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcolson13

Thank you Debi! Usually I add the greenery after roses because I'm not positive where everything is going. How do you figure out how where to pipe your greener? Do you plan out where every small and big rose will be?


No, I have a general idea (remember I'm the person who doesn't even sketch her cakes!) so I pipe the vines in a somewhat random pattern. I dont' worry about it too much because if i put a vine in the wrong place, a nice big leaf will cover it up! icon_lol.gif I put the leaves down under the BIG roses for added security, but add a lot of the leaves after the roses are down.

I remember a wedding before I became a decorator .... I was checking out the cake (like we all do, decorator or not!) and this person had just put a blob of green icing on the cake and stuck the flower on this blob. Didnt' even TRY to make it look like a leaf. Just a green background. I'd never even held a decorating bag in my hand yet, and I knew THAT was crappy work!

chrissypie Posted 2 Apr 2010 , 7:18pm
post #18 of 23

IndyDebi your buttercream Roses are too die for gorgeous! I so wish I could do buttercream roses like that! Beautiful cake.

chrissypie Posted 2 Apr 2010 , 7:23pm
post #19 of 23

IndyDebi your buttercream Roses are too die for gorgeous! I so wish I could do buttercream roses like that! Beautiful cake.

bonton Posted 8 May 2010 , 4:21am
post #20 of 23

Would RI roses work for this look? or would they be too heavy to stay put. My roses look like cabbage, so I purchase already made roses in various colors when i want to use roses.
Thanks
bonton

Jeep_girl816 Posted 8 May 2010 , 5:09am
post #21 of 23

IndyDebi rocks! My roses look like cabbage too icon_sad.gif I know it just takes practice but patience is a virtue I come up short on. I like how all the big roses are on the edge of Debi's cake and the smaller ones are on the side, gives you more of a fighting chance against gravity.

Paige_Pittman86 Posted 8 May 2010 , 5:34am
post #22 of 23

what does BUMP mean?? sorry i just see it often and i cant quite understand what it means

LindaF144a Posted 8 May 2010 , 1:41pm
post #23 of 23

Never mind. It works now.

Beautiful cake. This is the kind of work I strive to do be able to do someday. For no other reason than to just say I can. Maybe I should figure out a better reason. icon_wink.gif

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