Sweet_Guys Posted 31 Mar 2010 , 1:09pm

I have a friend who is yearning for a fudge his mother used to make. She is now deceased and he is reminiscing about those times.

He describes it as a chocolate fudge that is dry and crumbly to the touch that just melts in your mouth upon contact with the tongue. He says that he remembers he stirring the pot off and on for 8-9 hours.

Does anyone know what this might be?

Paul

42 replies
peg818 Posted 31 Mar 2010 , 9:14pm

i would try the recipe off the Hershey can

Elaine2581 Posted 31 Mar 2010 , 9:18pm

Who has that much time anymore? I use the recipe on the back of most jars of Marshmallow Cream - store brand or Kraft - also uses chocolate chips, sugar, etc. Our family loves it and it doesn't take long to make.

lorilori Posted 31 Mar 2010 , 9:38pm

I don't know about 8 or 9 hours, but stirring the fudge from the Hershey can recipe can sometimes feel like that. I think I usually cook/stir for about a half an hour, then cool the fudge as directed, then beat it some more before pouring into the pan. It's definitely at least an hour to an hour and a half process. The fudge is well worth it, though! Once you've gotten addicted to that kind of fudge, the marshmallow creme versions just don't stack up anymore (no offense to marshmallow creme fudge lovers, icon_lol.gif )

My dad made this fudge for years - it has always been a family favorite. Now that he's passed, one of my brothers and I compete for the "best fudge maker" title. It isn't an easy recipe, but a good candy thermometer makes it a lot easier to get it to turn out!

jonahsmom Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 1:24am

The old fashioned fudge is the ONLY fudge I will eat! The other fudge just isn't REAL fudge! icon_lol.gif

tazmycat Posted 1 Apr 2010 , 12:28pm

I agree, Hershey's all the way. Marshmallow fudge is nasty.

cutthecake Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 3:36am

I made Gale Gand's fudge recipe today, with a candy thermometer. It tastes delicious and creamy, but it didn't firm up. It's almost like frosting. Where did I go wrong? Can I do anything to it to get it to firm up now? I can probably use it in frosting, but I'd like to make it into good fudge, if possible.
Here's the recipe:
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/gale-gand/creamy-rich-walnut-fudge-recipe/index.html
Thanks for your advice.

madgeowens Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 3:54am

8 - 9 hours??? really?

icer101 Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 4:20am

my brothers and sisters and i grew up making the fudge recipe from the herseys cocoa box. That was a special thing for us to do together. delicious. Gonna make me some this week after reading this thread. lol!!!

peg818 Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 1:35pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

I made Gale Gand's fudge recipe today, with a candy thermometer. It tastes delicious and creamy, but it didn't firm up. It's almost like frosting. Where did I go wrong? Can I do anything to it to get it to firm up now? I can probably use it in frosting, but I'd like to make it into good fudge, if possible.
Here's the recipe:
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/gale-gand/creamy-rich-walnut-fudge-recipe/index.html
Thanks for your advice.




If it didn't firm up you might not have beat it long enough. Or your candy thermometer might have been off to start with. Make sure to calibrate your thermometer. If it still doesn't work out try a different recipe sometimes thats the problem.

As far as what to do with your candy you have now. If it is firm enough fill chocolates with it, it should make a wonderful truffle filling.

cutthecake Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 1:44pm

Thanks for your help. I did some research, and one source said to scrape the soft fudge into a saucepan, add water, and start the cooking process all over. I am buying a new candy thermometer before I do that, though.

cricket0616 Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 1:50pm

I honestly have never heard of a fudge cooking that long. If you cook the mixture too long, it will crystalize and turn back to sugar consistency.

I understand your dilemma. It seems as every family has their fudge recipe that they like and they love. Is there any family members that you can talk to and try and narrow down some of the ingredients used? Example - some recipes use milk others use cream, etc. I am sure whatever recipe you try, your friend will truly appreciate.

cutthecake Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 2:14pm

I've checked both the Hershey's syrup and cocoa cans, and I couldn't find a fudge recipe. The Hersheys.com website seems to have only quick-cook or marshmallow fudge recipes.
Can someone please direct me to the Hershey's fudge recipe mentioned above?
Thanks.

playingwithsugar Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 2:15pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

Thanks for your help. I did some research, and one source said to scrape the soft fudge into a saucepan, add water, and start the cooking process all over. I am buying a new candy thermometer before I do that, though.




Don't buy one of those glass thermometers, unless it's absolutely necessary. I have found that they don't last very long (can develop air bubbles in the stem) and they break if you give them a stern look.

I ordered a digital probe thermometer from Amazon (cheaper than the restaurant supply stores).

http://www.amazon.com/Polder-Original-Cooking-Timer-Thermometer/dp/B0000CF5MT/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&;qid=1292336079&sr=8-2

See if you can find something like this near you, instead.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

cutthecake Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 2:34pm

Wow. That's quite a thermometer. I've had my old-fashioned one for decades. Guess it's time for a replacement.
Thanks for the information.

rhondab Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 2:40pm

This is a slightly grainy fudge, like the old fashioned kind, but easier

Chocolate Fudge
1 cup sugar
1 small box chocolate pudding mix, NOT INSTANT
4 tsp instant coffee
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1 Tbs. butter

mix everything in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Boil for 4 minutes. Remove from heat and add :

1 cup chopped nuts

Beat until thickened. Pour into buttered pan Makes 1 1/2 lbs fudge

playingwithsugar Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 2:52pm

Back to thermometers for just a bit -

You can test your cooking thermometers by placing them in boiling water.
The temperature of boiling water is 212 degrees F and 100 degrees C. If your thermometer reads at these temps, it's still in working order.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

tazmycat Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 3:26pm

I agree, Marshmallow fudge - nasty. Hershey's all the way. Recipe, to the best of my knowledge (I do it off the top of my head, so correct if wrong)

3 cups sugar
2/3 cups cocoa
1 1/2 cup milk, ( i use canned and do 3/4 cup milk and 3/4 cup water)

Cook in saucepan on low heat, stirring constantly until it forms a soft ball in water, or reaches soft ball stage on thermometer. Remove from heat, add vanilla and pat of butter. Let cool a little and then beat the h--- out of it. when it loses its sheen, pour into well buttered pan.

sweetreasures Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 3:32pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutthecake

I've checked both the Hershey's syrup and cocoa cans, and I couldn't find a fudge recipe. The Hersheys.com website seems to have only quick-cook or marshmallow fudge recipes.
Can someone please direct me to the Hershey's fudge recipe mentioned above?
Thanks.




I can't get to my recipe at the moment but did a search for Hershy's old fashioned fudge and here it is. I usually never let it sit so long to cool or even stir until it loses it's glossiness because it would become so stiff. So maybe that is where the crumbly fudge comes into play. I would stir until it seemed to get stiffer and then pour into a casserole dish. I would also score it into bite size pieces since it would be easier to cut. I do remember it crumbling on me twice and thought I did something wrong.

http://www.food.com/recipe/hersheys-old-fashioned-rich-cocoa-fudge-4573

sweetreasures Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 3:43pm

Here is the recipe from the Hershey's website. My sister said it wasn't there or on the back of the can anymore but it is at least still on the website.

http://www.hersheys.com/recipes/5303/Rich-Cocoa-Fudge.aspx

it's the same as the one I posted above

icer101 Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 3:49pm

that is the recipe we used . we used condensed milk (half milk , half water). I make a chocolate icing the same way for my cakes, (old fashion way also. You cook it on top of the stove to a certain consistency , poke holds in your cake layers and put the fudge icing on each layer. It is so good. My mama made it that way, My family loves for me to make it that way. I freeze the cake for a couple of days , before cutting into it. Makes it that much more wonderful. I cook the icing to a soft ball stage.

playingwithsugar Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 4:14pm

Has anyone ever tried this?

2-ingredient fudge, from canned frosting and chocolate chips.

Here's a webpage about it -

http://www.nancys-kitchen.com/fudge-recipe-variations.htm

Theresa icon_smile.gif

sweetreasures Posted 14 Dec 2010 , 6:49pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by icer101

that is the recipe we used . we used condensed milk (half milk , half water). I make a chocolate icing the same way for my cakes, (old fashion way also. You cook it on top of the stove to a certain consistency , poke holds in your cake layers and put the fudge icing on each layer. It is so good. My mama made it that way, My family loves for me to make it that way. I freeze the cake for a couple of days , before cutting into it. Makes it that much more wonderful. I cook the icing to a soft ball stage.




This sounds good - will have to try it. The last time I made chocolate icing I decided to follow the Hershey can recipe but it was thinner than I wanted so I added more PS and cocoa for the right consistency. While it was still in a thicker consistency I thought it would make good truffle filling.

cutthecake Posted 15 Dec 2010 , 4:13am

Thanks for all the help and advice. I couldn't salvage the first batch of fudge I made. It turned into chocolate pecan soup. I'm planning on trying the Hershey's recipe tomorrow.
I realize there's no exact time for these stages, but can someone provide some approximate times?
How long should it take for the fudge to reach the soft ball stage?
How long should it take for the mixture to cool down?
How long should the fudge be beaten?
It seeme like each of these stages took forever. Is that normal?
Thanks again.

TexasSugar Posted 15 Dec 2010 , 3:45pm

The recipe we have always used for fudge (ours is a two toned one) has butter, sugar, evaporated milk, and marshmallow creme. It is cooked on the stove top until it boils, then cooked for another 5 or so mins. We then mix half with chocolate chips (nuts and rum can be added), pour that in the bottom and mix the other half with butterscotch chips and that is spread on top.

cutthecake Posted 15 Dec 2010 , 3:46pm

Batch #2--The Hershey's recipe (http://www.hersheys.com/recipes/5303/Rich-Cocoa-Fudge.aspx)

I followed the recipe PRECISELY as written.

The fudge was like chocolate pecan bubble gum at first, then it dried into a crumbly mass that wouldn't spread into pan. And so much of the stuff was stuck in the bottom of the saucepan.

What am I doing wrong? AGAIN?
Thanks.

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