Cake Toppled Over 30Sec Before Delivery

Decorating By mandirombold Updated 2 May 2010 , 7:48pm by SliceCakeStudio

mandirombold Posted 30 Mar 2010 , 12:53am
post #1 of 20

I had my first real cake nightmare this weekend. I was delivering a small 3 tier buttercream cake and it was not as stable as I had hoped I don't know why. but I do know I would rather make 3 fondant cakes to 1 buttercream cake. anyways I was about 30sec from my destination and had to make a sudden stop, the top 2 layers toppled right off the cake, like in slow motion. I continued on explained, went to the atm got and gave her her money back so she could locate a new cake. has anything like this ever happen to anyone before, I am really taking off with my cakes and this really made me second guess myself.I feel like I have no qlue what I am doing and sould just quit.

19 replies
Marianna46 Posted 30 Mar 2010 , 1:13am
post #2 of 20

Yes, it happened to me, but fortunately the cake was for a family member. It was on a large base, so fortunately it toppled onto another part of the base and not on the floor. I took it anyway and it was all gone before you could say boo, so I guess everyone liked it. The big bouquet of gumpaste flowers on the top was okay, so at least everybody could see how much work I put into it. I've never understood exactly why this happened. The cake apparently never settled but remained tender and flaky with that heavy bouquet on top. It was iced in buttercream, so I got icing all over myself and the front seat of the car. I guess everybody gets handed one of these so you don't get above yourself!

bobwonderbuns Posted 30 Mar 2010 , 1:14am
post #3 of 20

Oh sweetie, that's too bad. I know it's easier said than done, but please don't second guess yourself and DON'T YOU QUIT!! Every road has bumps in them, even this journey called cake decorating. Try and figure out what happened, and more importantly how you can avoid it the next time and go on from there. If you need to, invest in a good stacking video (Sugarshack's is great). I know it's hard. Geez, seems to be a lot of hardships in the cake world today.

leah_s Posted 30 Mar 2010 , 2:11am
post #4 of 20

Since I use SPS, no cakes don't topple over. I also set them on non-skid in the back of the SUV, so they never move, even with sudden braking.

step0nmi Posted 30 Mar 2010 , 2:16am
post #5 of 20

I'm so sorry icon_sad.gif this happens to the best of us.

It sounds like you didn't have a center dowel or support system...if they just toppled over like you describe.

dalis4joe Posted 30 Mar 2010 , 2:34am
post #6 of 20

this is just a learning experience for you... don't let it get you down... and just like leah said... from now on... sps... if you are not using the sps then you might want to take the cake un-assembled and then stack it at the venue to avoid any other disasters.... good luck and don't stop!!

mandirombold Posted 30 Mar 2010 , 2:14pm
post #7 of 20

thank you for the SPS info, i checked it out and that is how i made my first few cakes then switched to dowels so i can use a center support. I did have a center dowel I think if was poor contruction i my part i guess. you u ever get the SPS back I have never bought them.

mandirombold Posted 30 Mar 2010 , 2:15pm
post #8 of 20

going to swith to sps.

Patyortiz Posted 7 Apr 2010 , 8:02am
post #9 of 20

hi

I am italian, so I have no idea what is SPS... please, could someone explain to me?

thanks a lot

bye

milly-mel Posted 7 Apr 2010 , 9:11am
post #10 of 20

i was carrying an 2 tier cake up a flight of stairs just last week only for the top tier to topple off right outside the front door!!! it did survive though-luckily, i think because it didnt fall far as i was comming up stairs.

Edee Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 4:03pm
post #11 of 20

I'm clueless too, what is sps?

mamawrobin Posted 8 Apr 2010 , 4:38pm
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edee

I'm clueless too, what is sps?




Read Leah_s signature line. SPS instructions are a Sticky in the "How To" forums. icon_smile.gif

To the op...I am so sorry this happened to you. BTW I hate doing buttercream cakes as well icon_wink.gif

cakemaker61 Posted 21 Apr 2010 , 1:16am
post #13 of 20

I'm so sorry you had this experience. I almost lost a cake once while going up a steep driveway full of potholes. Ever since then, many years ago, I never take a cake to the venue already pre-stacked. It's so much easier and safer to take the tiers separately and then stack them there.

Nacnacweazel Posted 21 Apr 2010 , 1:31am
post #14 of 20

This is exactly why I will NEVER pre-stack. I always stack on-site, no matter what support system I am using. Hey, call me a wuss...but I just don't want to take the chance.

PS. I HATE BUTTERCREAM CAKES!!! They are SO NOT worth the trouble. No offense intended to all of you BC fans out there. I love you all! thumbs_up.gif

Occther Posted 21 Apr 2010 , 1:32am
post #15 of 20

I don't transport stacked cakes, either. I have multiple steps out the back door to my vehicle. I use bubble straws not dowels to stack.

cakemaker61 Posted 21 Apr 2010 , 2:29am
post #16 of 20

I'm just the opposite....I hate the taste and texture of fondant so don't do fondant cakes. Just buttercream all the way for me.

cakeaddikt Posted 2 May 2010 , 7:07pm
post #17 of 20

This very thing happened to me yesterday....and I feel like crap!! I still feel like it is a nightmare that I am waiting to wake up from. Didnt know the cake collapsed until infront of the clients door about to take the cake out of the car. I feel so bad and this has traumatized me...this has never happened to me before and I am doubting myself now too. I feel like I ruined the clients party. The top 2 tiers were damaged but she was still able to put on a cake stand and serve them. This is just the worst!!

cakeaddikt Posted 2 May 2010 , 7:07pm
post #18 of 20

This very thing happened to me yesterday....and I feel like crap!! I still feel like it is a nightmare that I am waiting to wake up from. Didnt know the cake collapsed until infront of the clients door about to take the cake out of the car. I feel so bad and this has traumatized me...this has never happened to me before and I am doubting myself now too. I feel like I ruined the clients party. The top 2 tiers were damaged but she was still able to put on a cake stand and serve them. This is just the worst!!

carmijok Posted 2 May 2010 , 7:34pm
post #19 of 20

Buttercream cakes should be very cold when delivered. The crusting and hardness of the frosting when it's cold makes it more stable and less likely to slide. ( I use real butter so it's pretty solid when cold). Plan on delivering in plenty of time for the frosting to warm up to room temperature. Use what I call a 'grippy pad'...those textured shelf liners that look like rubber netting. Nothing slips on those things...at least so far! Instead of having your cake free stand in the car, make a box that fits your board and has a grippy pad in the bottom. That way if there is some bump or sliding, the cake will be more secure. A dowel rod down the center, cold buttercream, grippy pads and a big cardboard box should get you there in good shape! So sorry about your accident! good luck next delivery. thumbs_up.gif

SliceCakeStudio Posted 2 May 2010 , 7:48pm
post #20 of 20

For my first 10 years, when fondant wasn't really around, I always stacked once I got to destination. Now... I put a dollop of bc on top of the cake before I set the next cardboard on it, and so on. If I deliver pre-stacked, which I always do now, I have a center dowel. This should only be about an inch shorter than your overall cake height. Sharpen with a pencil sharpener to drive it through all the tiers. And, I too use the shelf liner grippy stuff in the back of my car. Nothing will move, unless you are off-roading. Which in Colorado at least... could be very possible. Good luck, and don't give up. Learn from your mistakes, we've ALL had them!

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