Wasc Cake Sunk/fell In The Middle

Decorating By shearpamela Updated 27 Mar 2010 , 6:42am by madgeowens

shearpamela Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 7:17pm
post #1 of 12

I baked the recipe in two 10 inch pans side by side and one sunk - I cannot imagine how or why, but the cake is due tomorrow by 9am and I need to know if I have to run out to get another cake mix and start over or can I save it?
It is to be filled with one layer of strawberry filling and covered in fondant.
Once I fill it and put the layers together how long does it need to rest before frosting and doing fondant?
BTW, my first attempt this morning was a fiasco - I dropped one of the pans full of batter and had to clean up the mess and run to Kroger to start again so I REALLY hope I don't have to do that again!
Serious self doubt is beginning to set in....

11 replies
sugarshack Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:00am
post #2 of 12

how bad is the sink hole? The wasc often sinks for me cuz I use pillsbury; the added fats and sugars of that recipe make is dense and moist, but can tend to sink sometimes

first, are you sure it was not underbaked. if it is fully baked, and the sink is mild, I just level it and use it. it is usually perfect for me once I level it. The sink is never deeper than that.

HTH

madgeowens Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:17am
post #3 of 12

I find it hard sometimes with wasc to determine if its done.buy its always delish ...

kakeladi Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:18am
post #4 of 12

I agree w/Sharon. And which of the WASC recipes did you use?
I tend to think it might not be baked enough.

watertown Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:28am
post #5 of 12

I'm glad this topic came up. I have had the same problem. I read somewhere not to open the oven door at all until you feel certain it is almost done, otherwise the wasc cake will have the sink hole. Also, this might not make sense, but I was wondering if 2" vs 3" pans matters. When I use a 2" pan, I don't tend to have the problem as much. That could be a coincedence though.

sugarshack Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:29am
post #6 of 12

I agree about opening it or touching the surface too soon. will sink like a souffle.

Win Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:34am
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by shearpamela

I baked the recipe in two 10 inch pans side by side and one sunk - I cannot imagine how or why, but the cake is due tomorrow by 9am and I need to know if I have to run out to get another cake mix and start over or can I save it?
It is to be filled with one layer of strawberry filling and covered in fondant.
Once I fill it and put the layers together how long does it need to rest before frosting and doing fondant?
BTW, my first attempt this morning was a fiasco - I dropped one of the pans full of batter and had to clean up the mess and run to Kroger to start again so I REALLY hope I don't have to do that again!
Serious self doubt is beginning to set in....




Poor baby... you are going to have a long night! It sounds like it is underbaked. Did you put the pans on two different shelves in the oven? If it is looking gooey in the center, you will probably need to start over. Kakeladi's recipe rarely fails whereas I have issues with the other one. Kakeladi's is listed as The Original WASC.

As to the other questions... it is ideal to let a cake settle overnight once you fill it. The settling is such a key element in how the rest of it goes together. If you try to rush it (and some say they do successfully by placing a cookie sheet on the cake and add weight to force the layers together) it can still want to settle causing those unsightly bubbles in the fondant or the bulges that show up between layers. As well, once it has its buttercream underlayer, it really should chill in the fridge up to half an hour for better fondant adhesion.

Perk some coffee and settle in for some long hours ahead of you. I'm sending (((hugs))) your way 'cause I've been in your shoes and can feel the frustration. Don't let the sugar win!

Sorry, I see now that you said they baked side-by-side. That too can be a problem as they "compete" for even baking.

Win Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:36am
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by watertown

I'm glad this topic came up. I have had the same problem. I read somewhere not to open the oven door at all until you feel certain it is almost done, otherwise the wasc cake will have the sink hole. Also, this might not make sense, but I was wondering if 2" vs 3" pans matters. When I use a 2" pan, I don't tend to have the problem as much. That could be a coincedence though.




I NEVER successfully bake the other WASC in a 3" pan --always sinks. I quit trying and only use Kakeladi's recipe and 2" pans when I do WASC now.

shearpamela Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 1:39am
post #9 of 12

One pan seemed to have a spot that was underbaked and that must have been what caused the sinkhole so I had to go back to the store and start all over. I baked them at 325 until they didn't jiggle and a toothpick came out clean in the center. I may have only tested one cake thinking they would both be done equally....WRONG!
One was perfect....
I was so afraid to use that WASC recipe again so I am trying the 3D cake recipe this time.
I have done the buttercream dam according to Sharon Zambito's DVD,and I am using her frosting under the fondant. Jennifer Dontz's fondant is made, tinted and waiting in the wings....
I can't let the cake settle overnight before doing the fondant because I am a hairdresser with bright and early appointments tomorrow morning icon_sad.gif So i am trying the "new trick" someone recently posted on here using the ceramic floor tile on top of the wrapped cake for a couple of hours.
Next time I will try the Original WASC recipe - what is the difference that makes it more successful?
Is it true that a lower longer oven temperature will bake a cake more level?
I used Jennifer Dontz's idea of the damp strips of bath towels tied around the pans and it seemed to do pretty good. My bake even strips aren't long enough.

Win Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 1:51am
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by shearpamela


Next time I will try the Original WASC recipe - what is the difference that makes it more successful?
Is it true that a lower longer oven temperature will bake a cake more level?




I, personally and IMHO, think it is because it uses whole eggs. It still comes out like a white cake, but I think the whole eggs seem to give it more "umph." Kakeladi might need to weigh in on that. icon_biggrin.gif

I was taught that anything over 9" (and 2" deep )should bake at 325 degrees. Of course, that extends baking time quite a bit. 3" pans always bake lower as well.

Hope it all turns out well for you!

watertown Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 2:07am
post #11 of 12

That is good to know that someone else had issue with the 3" cake pan. I will stick to 2" pans with the WASC from now on. I just compared the Original WASC recipe to the one I was using and, as stated above, it does call for the whole egg vs. just the whites (and one less egg). Additionaly, the Original receipe calls for a little less water (1 cup vs 1 1/3 cups) and no oil, where I had been adding about an 1/8 cup. I will try the Original WASC for my next cake. Thanks!

madgeowens Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 6:42am
post #12 of 12

well that must be what I do wrong...I touch the cake to see if it springs back...and it sinks from that

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