DALIG Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 6:03pm
post #1 of

I ve read that u can use chalk to color flowers but i have tried and my flowers dont color as well as with petal dust. so i was thinking what if i try to make some petal dust with colored royal icing by leting it dry and than scrub it with a blade to make it powder, do you all think that it would work better than chalk. I am barely starting to learn how to make gumpaste flowers and i dont want to waste tons of money in petal dusts that are just going to be used for practice, some of my flowers look really beautiful but i want to make them look more real with diferent shades and colors. Thank you.

48 replies
ChoueiriCakeCo Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 10:51pm
post #2 of

That sounds like a great idea! You could also try using artists chalk, I've read that it gives deeper colors than regular chalk. Please try the royal icing method and let me know if it works for you! icon_smile.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 11:04pm
post #3 of

Don't know what types of chalk you were using, but I find that the chalk pastels work beautifully when ground up and used to dust flowers.

I bought a box of 48 chalk pastels at Michael's for very little $$. I grind them thru a small tea strainer ($1) into a small portion cup. I lighten them by adding in some corn starch and I can mix them to make custom colors.

Experimenting can't hurt, but I don't know how fine a powder you can get with dry royal. Also, the final product would be vulnerable to humidity (you usually steam gum paste flowers) and contact with grease (icing).

Rae

LeonardoLi Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 11:39pm
post #4 of

First of all you must put some shortening in you gum paste, so, the chalk powder can stick on the paste. You can use non toxic artistic pastels as well and mix some corn starch to brighten the color. I find out that potato flour gives more shine, sparkling look.

HamSquad Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 11:55pm
post #5 of

I've read in a Wilton forum: RI dots are dried, then ground up in a marble pedestal. Never tried this, but sounds interesting. I have to try the chalk pastels from a craft store. I've tried the kid's chalk doesn't give the intense color I need.
Hamsquad

icer101 Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:03am
post #6 of

i AGREE with blakescakes. scott woolley does this when he is teaching. i also do this.hth

madgeowens Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:15am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Don't know what types of chalk you were using, but I find that the chalk pastels work beautifully when ground up and used to dust flowers.

I bought a box of 48 chalk pastels at Michael's for very little $$. I grind them thru a small tea strainer ($1) into a small portion cup. I lighten them by adding in some corn starch and I can mix them to make custom colors.

Experimenting can't hurt, but I don't know how fine a powder you can get with dry royal. Also, the final product would be vulnerable to humidity (you usually steam gum paste flowers) and contact with grease (icing).

Rae




I saw these pastel gumpaste flowers in a wilton book I love, but what kind of chalk...kids chalk?? I don't know what to buy

Texas_Rose Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:20am
post #8 of

I bought a box of artists chalk from Hobby Lobby. It was $5 for 48 colors. There's a lot of variety there, from really deep, bold colors to soft pastels.

I've tried mixing powdered sugar and gel colors to make colored dusts and it doesn't work on gumpaste flowers, just doesn't make a smooth color to blend in.

One thing that does work is to make chunky edible glitter from gum arabic, gel colors and a little bit of luster dust. Paint it on waxed paper and let it dry, then fold the waxed paper in half and rub it together so that the dried mixture comes off the waxed paper in flakes.

BlakesCakes Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:22am
post #9 of

chalk pastels

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=270540880718&rvr_id=&crlp=1_263602_263622&UA=%3F*I8&GUID=21168f9b1260a0b58305ce75fff783c0&itemid=270540880718&ff4=263602_263622

http://www.amazon.com/Perfect-Projects-Scrapbooking-Stamping-Creative/dp/B000BKYB2M

http://www.dickblick.com/products/sargent-art-square-chalk-pastels/?wmcp=google&wmcid=products&wmckw=21930-1048-8892

http://www.orientaltrading.com/ui/browse/processRequest.do?requestURI=processProductsCatalog&categoryId=377320&BP=10575&ms=cse&cm_mmc=GoogleBase-_-datafeed-_-datafeed-_-datafeed&sku=73/69132&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=73/69132

Rae

3LittleBeesCookies Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 11:53am

Wow. I didn't know you could use chalks as petal dust or that it was safe to use around food.

dalis4joe Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:07pm

I didn't know all this!!!! kewlll

msulli10 Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:34pm

I have some left over royal icing. I might have to try this............

Ivy383 Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 12:43pm

This is all really cool... Thanks for posting. icon_smile.gif

Arabus Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 1:00pm

interesting .. thank you all for the tips

momg9 Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 3:40pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3LittleBeesCookies

Wow. I didn't know you could use chalks as petal dust or that it was safe to use around food.




You just have to make sure the chalks are non-toxic.

Renaejrk Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 4:10pm

I think maybe you were using regular chalk and not chalk pastels - more intense color

Ixtli Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 4:26pm

I learn something new everyday, thanks!

rainbow_kisses Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 4:52pm

I use non toxic pastel chalks and grin in a pestle and morter, You get a great variety of colours much cheaper than buying all the different petal dusts. Mix in some corn starch to lighten the darker colours. But I do always steam to seal in the colours too.

SharonK1973 Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 5:31pm

Is someone willing to post a picture of a flower dusted with the chalk pastel? I need to go buy some, but for today I am stuck at home! If I saw a picture that would tide me over until I get to the store! icon_lol.gif

LuvLyrics Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 5:55pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Don't know what types of chalk you were using, but I find that the chalk pastels work beautifully when ground up and used to dust flowers.

I bought a box of 48 chalk pastels at Michael's for very little $$. I grind them thru a small tea strainer ($1) into a small portion cup. I lighten them by adding in some corn starch and I can mix them to make custom colors.

Experimenting can't hurt, but I don't know how fine a powder you can get with dry royal. Also, the final product would be vulnerable to humidity (you usually steam gum paste flowers) and contact with grease (icing).

Rae




I am pretty new at making flowers, and I was wondering why do you steam the gp flowers? Is it necessary? and yje chalks you bought at Michael's ..was it the one used for scrapbooking?

Thanks..

cherrycakes Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 6:20pm

Here are two roses I made for practice so they're not that great but I dusted the pink one with chalk from Michaels and then steamed it. The rose was white to begin with.
LL

SharonK1973 Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 9:05pm

Thanks for posting the picture cherrycakes! What a remarkable color change! I'm going out to get some tomorrow to try it! I have some "blank" flowers to try it on!

The_Lil_Cakehouse Posted 28 Mar 2010 , 2:49am

WOW...I had no idea! thanks for sharing!!!!

mmlj316 Posted 28 Mar 2010 , 3:20am

Awsome! Thanks!!

rcolson13 Posted 28 Mar 2010 , 3:26am
Quote:
Originally Posted by cherrycakes

Here are two roses I made for practice so they're not that great but I dusted the pink one with chalk from Michaels and then steamed it. The rose was white to begin with.




That looks amazing. Please forgive my ignorance, but what does steaming the dusted flower do? Did you use a handheld steamer used for clothing?

mcdonald Posted 28 Mar 2010 , 3:37am

the chalk is awesome..so many more color choices!!

tavyheather Posted 28 Mar 2010 , 3:59am
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcolson13

Quote:
Originally Posted by cherrycakes

Here are two roses I made for practice so they're not that great but I dusted the pink one with chalk from Michaels and then steamed it. The rose was white to begin with.



That looks amazing. Please forgive my ignorance, but what does steaming the dusted flower do? Did you use a handheld steamer used for clothing?




same Q here icon_smile.gif

wow, this is so cool! I've sketched with chalk b4 (for the Sbux boards..seen those??) and I never thought I'd be using them for cakes!!

icer101 Posted 28 Mar 2010 , 4:17am

you steam your flowers or leaves,etc. to set the color after dusting. puts a little shine to them also.

Texas_Rose Posted 28 Mar 2010 , 4:33am

I don't use a steamer, just a pan of boiling water.

There's a difference between non-toxic and edible. I use chalk on things that aren't going to be eaten. To me, a gumpaste flower is not edible, especially not once it has a wire inside, so I use chalk on that. I also use markers on gumpaste, the non-toxic crayola markers. I don't use chalk on anything that will be eaten and if I use the markers on something that may be eaten, I warn them to remove it from the cake first.

Here's what the markers look like on gumpaste (the details on the baby and blanket):
Image
The flower petals were dusted with wilton's pearl dusts.

In this picture, the peach rose and the red rose were dusted with chalk:
Image
The pink rose was dusted with wilton's pink dust.

These roses were dusted in the centers only with ivory chalk for a really subtle effect:
Image

You can paint gumpaste too, when you need deep colors:
Image

Debi2 Posted 10 Apr 2010 , 12:28am

Thanks everyone....great info. Those petal dusts can get expensive if you use much of it! Can't wait to hear how the RI dust comes out!

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