14" Layer Split In Two When Stacking - Help!

Decorating By havingfun Updated 4 Apr 2010 , 4:48am by pastrygirls

havingfun Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 11:22pm
post #1 of 21

Please tell me how to get a 14" layer transferred onto the bottom layer. I had my bottom layer leveled, used a thickened BC dam, filled. Then I leveled my second layer, flipped it onto a cookie sheet (w/o sides) and the thing just STUCK on the pan! icon_cry.gif I have tried using a board, but it always sticks. This is the first time it just split in two pieces as I tried to get it onto the bottom layer. How do you do this! icon_confused.gif Now I have to go make another 14"! ARGH!!!! Please help.

20 replies
mamawrobin Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 11:24pm
post #2 of 21

I've never had any problem with mine sticking to a cardboard cakeboard but maybe sprinkle a little corn starch on before putting the cake on? Good luck.

prterrell Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 11:25pm
post #3 of 21

Are you trying to slide the cake or flip it? I find sliding does not work. I don't level the top layer until it is already stacked onto the bottom layer. I flip it onto the bottom layer straight from the cooling rack. HTH!

havingfun Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 11:46pm
post #4 of 21

prterrell, how do you flip a 14" layer onto another? Wouldn't that leave you the raw edge on top? I thought you were supposed to always have the "bottom" (part in pan) facing up so it was nice and smooth. When you flip, do you keep your hand under it? I am sorry, I am brain dead icon_redface.gif . mamawrobin, The top of my cake is so moist, how do you overcome this?

Thank you both so much for responding! It has been a very long day. To top it off, I think I have a kidney stone. It has not been a good day...

mamawrobin Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 11:51pm
post #5 of 21

I do flip mine but I have it on the board so that the bottom is on the top. You have to start out with two cardboard rounds to achieve this. Do I make any sense? When I first move my cake to a cakeboard I flip it onto the board then I take another board and flip it onto that. Then when I'm ready to flip it onto the bottom layer it's in the position I need for it to be. I hope I'm making sense I am no good at giving directions. Good luck.

mamawrobin Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 11:53pm
post #6 of 21

Sorry, I meant to say I have position mine on the cakeboard so that WHEN I FLIP IT onto the iced layer, the bottom will be on top.

nhbaker Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 12:01am
post #7 of 21

flipping 14's can be tough. I find that if it's good and cold (I wrap & refridgerate my cakes over night before icing) then it's much easier to work with. I don't usually have an issue with it sticking to the cardboard but sometimes, if I think sticking might be an issue, I'll put a piece of parchment or waxed paper on the board before putting the cake on it & then wrap it and refridgerate it. I feel for you.

havingfun Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 12:12am
post #8 of 21

Sooo you have it flipped, then you just slide???? it off?

CindiM Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 12:39am
post #9 of 21

1. Cool the 14 inch layer on a rack.
2. Freeze the 14 inch layer wrapped in plastic, overnight if possible.
3. Take it out of the freezer, after frozen and put the cake back in the 14 inch pan as it starts to thaw, cut the cake level with the top of the pan. Take care with the knife and a partially frozen cake. Hold the cake down with a paper towel and cut as the cake is thawing. Sometimes you may have to wait a little for the top to thaw. Again, be careful.
4. Then take the leveled cake out of the 14 inch pan (it is still 90% frozen) turn it upside down and put the cut/leveled surface on the filling of the bottom cake. Now you have a nice uncut flat top to ice.

Have fun!

havingfun Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 12:59am
post #10 of 21

CindiM, thanks for the great directions. We are still not connecting on my problem. I know I am not good at getting my idea across. I understand all the aspects of everything you have described. My problem is the mechanics of your Step 4. How do you get it from whatever it is on (bottom up) ONTO the filled layer? I have done this many times, but today I had a bad accident, and just really would like to know what conveyance you use to get the layer ONTO the bottom filled layer. Does this make sense?? Do you use a board, a rimless cookie sheet, your hand, your cooling rack - do you slide it, or what??

CindiM Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 1:06am
post #11 of 21

My two hands!

havingfun Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 1:12am
post #12 of 21

So, since it is still frozen, you can just do hold it! How cool! thank you for hanging in there with me.

indydebi Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 1:28am
post #13 of 21

14" cake is cooled and leveled and sitting on a cardboard.
Lay another cardboard or cooling rack on top of this cake.
Pick up the cake, which is sandwiched between the cardboard and the cooling rack.
Flip.
Cake is now "upside down" on the cooling rack.

I then push the cake to the edge of the cooling rack.
Place the edge of this cake on the edge of the bottom layer cake.
Holding cooling rack at about 45 degree angle, pull out the cooling rack, while gently pushing the cake off of the rack and onto the bottom layer.
The cake will gently fall into place onto the bottom layer.

If the cake is partically frozen, it's WAY easier.


In the beginning years of my caking, I used to do the "close eyes, pray and FLIP!" method, but this way is MUCH better. Much!!! icon_biggrin.gif

wyovol Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 1:36am
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi



In the beginning years of my caking, I used to do the "close eyes, pray and FLIP!" method, but this way is MUCH better. Much!!! icon_biggrin.gif




Since I am still in this phase of caking, I appreciate your explanation of how you flip your cakes. Closing my eyes and praying left me with 20 inches (2 10 inch cakes) of crumbled cake last week. icon_biggrin.gif

havingfun Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 1:40am
post #15 of 21

Bless you Indydebi! You understand me! I am in love! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
After I rebake in the morning, I will definitely try this. Thanks to everyone for trying to help this poor, tired soul.

havingfun Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 1:28am
post #16 of 21

thank you all!! I rebaked, cooled, leveled, then stuck it in the freezer for a few minutes. Used the hold it 45 degrees above top and slid it right off. Thank you all for your help!

jammjenks Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 2:12am
post #17 of 21

I know I'm coming in late to the discussion, but you proably didn't have to rebake it at all. I use them if they have split in two, as long as they didn't crumble completely apart.

havingfun Posted 27 Mar 2010 , 2:17am
post #18 of 21

jammjenks, this cake was going to be covered in basketweave and i did not want to take a chance of anything happening after all that work! Thanks for your help anyway!!

dguerrant Posted 3 Apr 2010 , 4:35am
post #19 of 21

i chill mine over night covered in plastic wrap, take out, level in pan, flip out on my hand (yes even 14") peel off the waxed paper ( used to keep it from saticking to the pan) and place on top. I tend to handle mine like pizza dough, i have had a few to crack, i just use frosting to glue them back together.

karateka Posted 3 Apr 2010 , 5:08am
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

14" cake is cooled and leveled and sitting on a cardboard.
Lay another cardboard or cooling rack on top of this cake.
Pick up the cake, which is sandwiched between the cardboard and the cooling rack.
Flip.
Cake is now "upside down" on the cooling rack.

I then push the cake to the edge of the cooling rack.
Place the edge of this cake on the edge of the bottom layer cake.
Holding cooling rack at about 45 degree angle, pull out the cooling rack, while gently pushing the cake off of the rack and onto the bottom layer.
The cake will gently fall into place onto the bottom layer.

If the cake is partically frozen, it's WAY easier.


In the beginning years of my caking, I used to do the "close eyes, pray and FLIP!" method, but this way is MUCH better. Much!!! icon_biggrin.gif





exactly how I do mine.

pastrygirls Posted 4 Apr 2010 , 4:48am
post #21 of 21

if you're not having any luck flipping the cake layer onto your filled cake, try this...sprinkle the cardboard with a little granulated sugar. then when you have to get the layers on the cake, you can just slide them off. the sugar acts like ball bearings and it shouldnt stick and will just slide off the cardboard. this is how i do big cakes without trying to flip it over. best of luck!

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