What Is The Name Of The Cutting System Used On Ultimate Cake

Decorating By TheCornerBakery Updated 5 Apr 2010 , 12:38am by JenniferAtwood

TheCornerBakery Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 4:56am
post #1 of 47

Hi,
I was just watching the Ultimate Cake off on TLC and I noticed for the second time this season a cutting system used by one of the competitors.

Does anyone know what the name of the system that is being used?

I know it is one that is probably used for scrapbooking etc and they have just modified it for gumpaste/fondant work.

thanks for all the help

46 replies
Bfisher2 Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 5:05am
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The one they are using is the yet to be released "Cake Cricut".... it is to be released in mid may sometime and is causing quite the stir.....*LOL*

TheCornerBakery Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 5:24am
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For all the times I have been in Joanns or Michaels looking for various items for cakes I had the feeling those die cutting machines would work on gumpaste/ frosting sheets.

I am so happy that this machine is coming out and can't wait to use one to create some really fun designs.

Thanks for sharing the name of the machine. I saw a few demos on Youtube and they were really awesome to see what can be done with these.

Bfisher2 Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 5:37am
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Some people are saying that its cheating but I think we live in a techno age... keep up or get left behind.... you cant beat the precision for making a neatly decorated cake, but there are still ways of showing your sugar talent with florals and hand piped accent etc etc. Im really looking forward to playing with this machine as well....

TheCornerBakery Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 5:50am
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I know some will say that about "cheating" but I don't believe this is cheating anymore than using a stencil, silicone molds, stress free supports, or the agbay.

They all have their place in today's market and I can't wait to have some fun with this machine also

Bfisher2 Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 6:02am
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Exactly!....icon_smile.gif

ayerim979 Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 6:14am
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I believe the one on the show was the regular expression though . The Cake cricut is RED in color. I do not think its cheating , its just an easier way of cutting gumpaste/fondant images.

dalis4joe Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 11:17am
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Margaret Braun said... I'm an artist... I work with my hands... she said they used too much cricut.... (I think that's why they didn't win).. But I was at the Atlantic City Bakers Expo this past weekend... saw a demo with the cricut for cakes (coming out on May 1st) and we loved it!!! and I can't wait to get it....

I think it's amazing... and I don't think it's cheating either... but I also can see where Margaret is coming from....

I, personally... WILL USE IT!! hehehe.... it's awesome and you can even use your own art that you do WITH YOUR HANDS... so I am all for it...

Jennifer Atwood did the demo... and if u get it through her... S&H is only $10.00

mbt4955 Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:00pm
post #9 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ayerim979

I believe the one on the show was the regular expression though . The Cake cricut is RED in color. I do not think its cheating , its just an easier way of cutting gumpaste/fondant images.




I was going to say the same thing. I actually had the honor of taking a Cricut bridal cake class from Martha and Becky in Austin. We used two Expressions and two Cakes and, although the Expression takes a little more work, the results were the same. Here are pictures of my end result plus one with 10 of our 16 cakes. As far as Margaret's comment goes, I am a big fan of hers, but saying that using a Cricut is not using your hands is cr%@!
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CakeInfatuation Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:14pm
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I have a personal cricut. I got it on sale at AC Moore last summer. With my frequent shopper bonus... I paid $90.00. I love it. I can get any font I want, intricate designs, etc. I posted 3 cakes this past weekend where I was able to use the cricut. It saves so much money on cookie cutters and stuff. I mean... really, how many different cutters can I store? Get the software Sure Cuts A Lot. And download Inkscape (free) and you can literally cut anything!

I'm not sure of the difference between the regular cricut and the cake cricut. But I'll likely stick with what I have until it is no longer adequate or I kill it. (which I'm good at). I just had to buy a deep set blade and remove the adhesive from the mat. I got the Krud Cutter from Lowes that is non-toxic and squirted some of that on the mat and then wiped it off. Then washed it clean. Easy Peezy Lemon Squeezy!

Have fun with it. The possibilities are endless! And I agree. Not cheating anymore than molds, stencils, or cookie cutters. We need to find more efficient and cost effective ways of doing things. This is one.

FierceConfections Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:17pm
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I think the Cricut can help create some beautiful, flawless designs. However, you're not going to win any competitions with them because, literally, anyone can do it with a little bit of practice. So, I can see where Margaret was coming from. There's no real demonstration of skill or creativity (prefab design cartridges, etc.).

mbt4955 Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:18pm
post #12 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeInfatuation

I have a personal cricut. I got it on sale at AC Moore last summer.




I'm so glad to see this post. I have the same one that I got on sale at Michael's, opened the box at work to look at it and there it sits. I've been dying to give it a shot, but was kind of scared that it wouldn't work like the ones we had in class and that I would think I had to get the Cake! icon_smile.gif If I have specific questions on using that machine, would you help? I went ahead and bought the deep cut blade while I was spending! Thanks so much!!!

CakeInfatuation Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:29pm
post #13 of 47

Maybe... but anyone can use a cookie cutter with a little practice. Stencil on a cake with a little practice.

I don't see how this is any different except that it is a new technique. I think in time it will find its place.

Granted, if you use it for everything... well, then that's like using cutters for a whole cake.

But used to compliment a design where warranted, it's a fantastic tool. I still sculpt, pipe, crimp, make flowers... etc. Just use this in addition.

I think you can win competitions using this technique. But not if it is the only technique you show.

mbt4955 Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:31pm
post #14 of 47

Borrowed from Becky's Facebook page ... read this and then say that the Cricut work was alll they did ...... tapedshut.gif Now I will get to work and stop reading CC forums. icon_smile.gif

"Our Cake!!!!! We had 7 tiers plus 6 satellite cakes. We used mold work, string work, hand piping, we had a glass(sugar) gold slipper sitting on a sculpted pillow cake and a gold sugar Tiera, we had magnificent sugar flowers, we had a white chocolate totally edible framed photo of the couple, and we had a huge poured sugar pink diamond topper and we were smart enough to use a computer to help us create designs to finish a 6.5 foot tall cake in 8.5 hours!!!! AND ithe entire cake turned slowly, quietly and elegantly! I am so proud of our team!"

FierceConfections Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:34pm
post #15 of 47

All I know is that after speaking with a few judges at the cake show in Austin last month, there was a lot of disapproval when it came to the Cricut-decorated cakes. And I don't think any of those cakes placed even though they looked amazing.

But don't get me wrong. In every day decorating for clients, I'm sure the Cricut is a great tool. Just don't expect to take a Cricut cake to OSSAS and win.

forthwife Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:42pm
post #16 of 47

I too am caught up in the Cricut craze. So much that I won 2 on Ebay last night. OOPS! Now what do I do?

joeycakes Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:46pm
post #17 of 47

Hi All,
If you're interested and are in the Marland "area", both Cricut and the McLure's will be vendors at the upcoming Great American Cake Show in Maryland (May 1st & 2nd). There will be demonstrations, DVDs to purchase (Linda McLure procduces DVDs on how to use the standard cricut for cake docrating) AND there will be opportunites for both cake show participants and the general public to win several new $400+ cricut cake machines!
I started another post regarding the cake show - check it out (or our website: greatamericancakeshow.com) for more information!
~ Leaha

cakesdivine Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:50pm
post #18 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeInfatuation

Maybe... but anyone can use a cookie cutter with a little practice. Stencil on a cake with a little practice.

I don't see how this is any different except that it is a new technique. I think in time it will find its place.

Granted, if you use it for everything... well, then that's like using cutters for a whole cake.

But used to compliment a design where warranted, it's a fantastic tool. I still sculpt, pipe, crimp, make flowers... etc. Just use this in addition.

I think you can win competitions using this technique. But not if it is the only technique you show.




I totally agree, cookie cutters, molds, etc are great tools; Cricut Cake is just another tool. Margaret's cakes are very tell tale, most have a similar design and she is about the painting on her creations, most having a gumpaste chalis on top. Also, when working in high production, it is more cost effective to use shortcut (no pun intended) tools to get the most for your man hour's dollar. Let's see pay a person for 5 hours to do these cut outs by hand or spend 30 minutes and cut the all out on one sheet...at $15 an hour for that decorator...HMM, good business tells me USE THE CRICUT!
Besides, competition or no, we are in this business to make money right? I don't think our clients are going to care one iota that the Fleur De Lis pattern on her cake was created by a computerized machine as opposed to an individual who took for ever cutting them out by hand.

Win Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:52pm
post #19 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by FierceConfections

All I know is that after speaking with a few judges at the cake show in Austin last month, there was a lot of disapproval when it came to the Cricut-decorated cakes. And I don't think any of those cakes placed even though they looked amazing.

But don't get me wrong. In every day decorating for clients, I'm sure the Cricut is a great tool. Just don't expect to take a Cricut cake to OSSAS and win.




This, too, is where I raise my eyebrows... two weeks ago at the Queen City Cake Competition a beginner cake got bumped into intermediate because the judges did not realize the cut-outs were Cricut... the flowers on top of the cake were thick, and the grass at the base was piped too wet and therefore flopped over --those were the true signs it was a beginner cake. The Cricut produced cuttings were all the same and perfect which is why they bumped it. How will cakes ever be judged on true skill level if they are go the route of being enhanced by Cricut?

I'm not opposed to using it for overall everyday production and can see the benefit of the awesome fonts, etc. but I do think judging will have to change if they are going to be used in competition whether on a small local level or on the level of highly publicized shows such as OK, etc.


edited to add that I should say the cake that got bumped did win First Place in Intermediate...

tracycakes Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 1:53pm
post #20 of 47

I completely agree with Cakesdivine. I would love to get a Cricut machine as it is another tool. Like using cookie or gumpaste cutters only....bigger and faster. I don't think using one for competition would give you any points though. But, if you used cricut decorations and embellished with piping, texture, etc., that shows more skill, just like using plain cutters don't help either.

endymion Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 2:02pm
post #21 of 47

I agree that Cricut is a tool, like any other. Is it cheating to use silicon molds? Does it make a difference if you made the mold yourself? I see people on the show use silicon molds all the time (for poured sugar, etc.) and no one calls it "cheating."

What about edible images? Cheating, or not? How about impression mats? For that matter, what about using a fondant sheeter instead of rolling fondant "by hand"? Or an Agbay to cut your tiers perfectly level?

Like all of these other tools, I think Cricut has its place even in competition. If, for example, the decorator designed their own shapes and then used Cricut to make the cuts lovely and clean and sharp, I see no problem with it. In fact, I think it is clever to figure out speedy ways to make an attractive cake -- isn't that one of the things the competition is all about?

cakesdivine Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 2:31pm
post #22 of 47

I forsee that in the future many cake competitions might start a new category specifically for cake designs primarily produced by Cricut machines.

FierceConfections Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 2:43pm
post #23 of 47

I think it comes down to the difference between running a business where having a Cricut totally makes sense for the reasons CakesDivine pointed out, and creating a handmade work of art for the sake of art alone, which IMO is what cake shows and competitions are for.

I agree that a separate category for cakes decorated solely with a Cricut is probably in the near future.

There is just something kind of sad about seeing a cake decorated with cutouts sitting next to a cake decorated with floating stringwork.

adven68 Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 3:42pm
post #24 of 47

I am thrilled to be able to offer a client a scrollwork cake. Up till now, when I told them how much my scroll cakes cost, they would almost pass out. for almost all my competition cakes, I literally hand cut and place each scroll, flower or dot, so, I probably wouldn't appreciate a cricut cake next to mine LOL
I did purchase the machine for my store use because it will save me tons of time and money (no more cutters!!!) .
Will I use them in competitions? You know what? I think if I entered one of my regular competition cakes, nobody would be able to tell the difference between mine and the cricut. Will I get penalized for being a perfectionist? Hmmmmmmm.....

editing to add link to photo of cake:

http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1621609&done=1

TobiasWilhelm Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 7:18pm
post #25 of 47

For us it is a tool, just like cutters, molds, etc - does it still take a creative decorator to use it? Absolutely, in my opinion. The same paint brush can paint a wall or the ceiling in the Sistine chapel, depending who holds it. Same thing here - I've seen some cricut cakes that basically paste shapes to the side of a cake and seen some cakes that use the same designs, but make them into cake art.

What I can tell you is that we charge a lot of money for decorator time (like between 1/4 and 1/2 a Cricut Cake per hour - since we're not supposed to talk price) and brides like to have the option to go Cricut cut in 2 hours versus hand cut in 12 hours. It simply makes some designs more affordable.

In a high volume production setting, it makes even more sense. The week before the Superbowl we literally cut thousands of fleur-de-lis out of black gumpaste to stick on cookies, petit fours, cupcakes, showcase cakes and so on. Cutters are not available in all sizes and this made it possible for us to have the right size for every product.

Just my two cents.

Tobias

Denise Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 3:02am
post #26 of 47

Just thought I would weigh in to the discussion - I was on Martha & Becky's team for both competitions.

Using the Cricut does cut down on time but it STILL takes time to design the elements. On our cake was a diamond type pattern with circle in it - it represented the groom's love of the NY Yankees. It was a combination of patterns. Martha took a great deal of time and creative power to create designs that reflected what she was told the bride and groom treasured.

On the cake were a multitude of techniques -

Poured, pulled and molded sugar pieces (the shoe, the diamond, the tiara all made on site)
Hand Painting on two tiers
A round spherical cake (lol if you have never done a round cake you haven't lived!!)
Swags
Chocolate frame and edible image
Gum paste peonies, roses, leaves, stephanotis made on site
hand molded pearls
molded medallions
fantasy brooches with tiny pearls and sugar crystals
Hand piping all all of the tiers to enhance the Cricut lace pieces
and of course, the Cricut designs that were hand dusted and place on the cakes individually
A sculpted pillow cake with hand carving
A plaque on the top of the pillow to hold the shoe

The cake looked like a finished wedding cake - nothing looked rushed or quickly done. It was completed with nothing left out. It was what Martha was told the bride wanted...pink, elegant, traditional yet contemporary and Martha delivered just that. I was so proud and thrilled to have been part of this team! Woot!!! It was great fun and a challenge to do something on TV that I have never done before - that was work with Cricut! LOL prior to stepping on the set I had NEVER worked with it. It was a bit of a challenge when the laces DIDN'T want to stay on...didn't want to accept the color...and I had to MAKE sure they were level...just like when you use cutters...except this was way more difficult because I was working with a much large piece of gum paste. Woot! I made it happen though!

I am posting some close ups of the cake - the little half round cut out pieces are stunning and don't really show unless you are right up on the cake - gorgeous gorgeous detail!!
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madgeowens Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 3:14am
post #27 of 47

The cartridges are like $60 + don't you find that terrible expensive?

PDXSweetTreats Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 3:16am
post #28 of 47

Denise, thanks for posting that. I thought ALL of the teams did amazing work -- that had to be a difficult choice! And, not only did you all do beautiful work, you were a real class act. That was a fun episode.

CakeInfatuation Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 3:40am
post #29 of 47

I've never bought a cartridge. I use Sure Cuts A Lot and can cut ANYTHING!

Bannette Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 3:44am
post #30 of 47

I have used my cricut on cakes and love it. I think you have to use your judgment as to how much is too much and what your client wants. I don't think you are going to win any competitions with a cake decorated entirely out of designs cut on a cricut, but for your customers who like the look I say more power to ya! I think it will be a personal preference with the customers. Some will want the designs piped, some will like the clean cuts of the cricut, others might like the stencils...it is more about making your client happy and if your "client" is a judge then maybe you should use less computer generated cutouts. BTW her cake was my favorite on that particular episode.

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