Why Do People Think More Cake Costs Less??

Decorating By sugarspice Updated 26 Mar 2010 , 1:59pm by TexasSugar

sugarspice Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 2:50am
post #1 of 12

I made a b-day cake (1/4 sheet) for an employee at my daughters preschool and she loved it. Asked what kind of frosting it was, said she usually scrapes it off, but found herself adding more on! Then 2 weeks later, she asks for pricing on 1 or 2 full sheet cakes (about a weeks notice). I gave her a print out of pricing along with options to cut it smaller if food was served, filling options, etc. Well, I heard NOTHING back from her. It was the same price/serving that she paid for the 1/4 sheet-she must have freaked when she saw that price x4! Oh well, I had enough orders that week, but I wonder why people think more cake should cost less. icon_confused.gif

11 replies
prterrell Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 2:51am
post #2 of 12

She probably didn't realize what size a "full" sheet is. I know of plenty of people who think that the 9x13 or 12x18 are a full sheet.

jammjenks Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 3:03am
post #3 of 12

If you didn't hear back from her, how did you know she expected to pay less money for more cake? icon_confused.gif

ayerim979 Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 3:16am
post #4 of 12

when you gave her the pricing sheet did she, open her eyes really wide and said " Okay I will let you know" ?

If not chances are she maybe had change of plans, if she paid for your previous cake then she knows how much your servings are. IMO

leah_s Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 3:17am
post #5 of 12

Ditto prterrell. Most people have NO idea how big a full sheet is.

nicoles0419 Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 3:24am
post #6 of 12

yea alot of friends think a sheet is a 9x13 its annoying lol I always have to explain or ask them "what do u consider a sheet cake"

leily Posted 24 Mar 2010 , 3:48pm
post #7 of 12

when someone ask for a sheet cake, the first thing I always ask is, "how many servings do you want?" Like stated earlier, people have no idea how large a 1/4, 1/2, or full sheet is. Heck even within the industry there is no standard, so your 1/4 sheet is probably a different size than my 1/4 sheet.

So always check with how many people they're looking to serve, then give them a price. Or just give them a price per person and tell them you can get close to the servings they need.

sugarspice Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 4:43pm
post #8 of 12

Well, I AM assuming she thought it was too much. She was not at work when I put the price info on her desk. I did ask her the next day if she got it and she said she did...nothing more. It was the way she said it-I'm not able to put that into typed wordsicon_smile.gif Her eyes were bigger and her head leaned back--to me, her body language said "yikes!" I did ask how many servings she needed and told her what a full sheet would serve. Oh well, I am just glad I didn't decrease my prices for a "sale" icon_smile.gif

ArtieTs Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 5:09pm
post #9 of 12

If it were me I'd be glad for no response especially with that short notice. I despise full sheet cakes (too much darn work!) and I too think most people that order them have no idea how much cake that is. I can just imagine how much cake gets thrown out or picked over. The thought of wasted cake makes me CRINGE!

carmijok Posted 25 Mar 2010 , 5:31pm
post #10 of 12

The bakery I worked for did cake balls. They were hand made and very time consuming and also one of our more popular items. It never failed that someone would ask if there were a 'quantity discount'. We did not offer one simply because the same amount of labor and ingredient costs were there regardless of how many anyone wanted. I don't believe you can apply those buy-one-get-one-free concepts to cake, however the public will always try.

sugarspice Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 1:42pm
post #11 of 12

Yes, I have said the same thing when someone came out and asked if there was discount for multiple cakes. I just said "no, because they are not less work" & she understood icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 26 Mar 2010 , 1:59pm
post #12 of 12

Why do people expect less when they order more?

Because it works in other areas of their life. When you go to the grocery store more often than not the bigger packages cost less. Or if you are ordering a large number of something you will often get offered a discount. Or when you buy over a certain amount of stuff online you get free shipping, thus getting a 'discount' for ordering more.

Of course I don't think this translates to all areas of life, but sometime our brains get stuck on the buy more for less principal.

It could have been sticker shock as others stated, it could have been she just hadn't really done the math, or realised how much bigger that cake would be. Just remember your prices are what they are, and not everyone will be able to afford them. And that is okay. icon_smile.gif

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