Working With Fondant

Decorating By jayshunnie22 Updated 21 Mar 2010 , 7:49pm by catlharper

jayshunnie22 Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 4:45pm
post #1 of 8

Hi CC family.Ive worked with marshmallow fondant before and hated it,i thought that after you let it sit it was way to hard to roll and if you use it immediately its ok to roll but so soft that every imperfection showed.Anyhoo,i just bout some fondx fondant and the texture has me thrown a bit,it reminds me of mmf and it kept tearing when i rolled it.i worked a lil shortening in but i think that may have made it worse.what do you think went wrong, not enough kneading time? Help i have to make another cake for friday. oooo and while i have you here,i have gel food coloring and i kept adding and adding and i couldnt get my fondant to get to the color i wanted..what the hell? icon_cry.gif

7 replies
ladyk333 Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 5:01pm
post #2 of 8

I'm sure you'll get lots of input from some very talented people, but I'll give you my two cents as well! I'm newer at this, but have had the same problem. I added shortening and things seemed to almost disintegrate. On another batch, I kneaded in more icing sugar and that really seemed to help. Also, if you've added a lot of gel color, I believe that can distort the consistency as it is liquidy, and therefore you need more dry ingredients (someone can correct me if I'm wrong!!). What color are you trying to achieve? I know that for a dark brown some people sift in cocoa (do sift it or it can leave clumps) and then add the coloring from there.

Good luck!!

wittylorrie Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 5:24pm
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by jayshunnie22

Hi CC family.Ive worked with marshmallow fondant before and hated it,i thought that after you let it sit it was way to hard to roll and if you use it immediately its ok to roll but so soft that every imperfection showed.Anyhoo,i just bout some fondx fondant and the texture has me thrown a bit,it reminds me of men and it kept tearing when i rolled it.i worked a lil shortening in but i think that may have made it worse.what do you think went wrong, not enough kneading time? Help i have to make another cake for friday. ooh and while i have you here,i have gel food coloring and i kept adding and adding and i couldnt get my fondant to get to the color i wanted..what the hell? icon_cry.gif



Hi.... MMF or any Fondant is always can be a hit and miss situation(lol)
I have days where it slides on without a hitch and other times it behaves horribly!
The more color you add the softer it gets. Tinting it definitely changes the chemistry of the fondant. Sometimes when going for dark or really bright your better off buying it already tinted. The best way I believe is to airbrush color on untinted fondant.
Your best bet is to not roll out the Fondant to thin. That will help in the ripping. Do not overwork it. You might consider rolling out Marzipan first then the Fondant. You will get a very smooth finish that way. The key is to make sure your icing is as smooth as you can get on your cake before laying the Fondant.
I have a large rolling mat. I roll my Fondant and lift the whole mat almost over the cake and I peel the fondant over the cake. Voila no rips. Its far easier. Good luck.
Witty Lorrie icon_biggrin.gif

catlharper Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 5:33pm
post #4 of 8

I work with MMF all the time and the first tip I have to give you is to make the MMF at least one day ahead of time, put a thin layer of crisco around the dough ball and then wrap securely and put in the fridge at least 24 hours in advance of needing it. When you take it out simply put it in the microwave, 15 secs at a time so you don't get it melted, till it's soft enough to knead out again. If your fondant is sticky add powdered sugar to the knead and if it's cracking add a bit of crisco to the knead. And you have to knead and knead and knead till it rolls smoothly. Now for gell coloring. If you are trying to get a brown or black then you may want to start off with chocolate MMF to get it dark enough. Red is almost impossible as is navy blue. The darker or more vibrant the color the harder it is to get. There are times when buying a commercial fondant that has been dyed to the color you want is smart and red, for me, is one of those times. Using gell color will dry out your fondant so you will need more crisco to help balance it out. If you roll it too thick it will tear from the weight, if you roll it too thin there won't be enough material to hold up to the smoothing process. It does take a bit of practice but it's a quick learning curve and if you have the patience to keep working at it then you will eventually get the "feel" of it. I still have good and bad fondant days (and you will curse the day when you have to work with it and it's raining outside! Humidity is awful for fondant) and there are times when I have realize my limits as a cake artist, the limits of cake and the limits of the fondant but it is my prefered medium over buttercream. Hope this helps!

Cat

wittylorrie Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 5:47pm
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by catlharper

I work with MMF all the time and the first tip I have to give you is to make the MMF at least one day ahead of time, put a thin layer of crisco around the dough ball and then wrap securely and put in the fridge at least 24 hours in advance of needing it. When you take it out simply put it in the microwave, 15 secs at a time so you don't get it melted, till it's soft enough to knead out again. If your fondant is sticky add powdered sugar to the knead and if it's cracking add a bit of crisco to the knead. And you have to knead and knead and knead till it rolls smoothly. Now for gel coloring. If you are trying to get a brown or black then you may want to start off with chocolate MMF to get it dark enough. Red is almost impossible as is navy blue. The darker or more vibrant the color the harder it is to get. There are times when buying a commercial fondant that has been dyed to the color you want is smart and red, for me, is one of those times. Using gel color will dry out your fondant so you will need more crisco to help balance it out. If you roll it too thick it will tear from the weight, if you roll it too thin there won't be enough material to hold up to the smoothing process. It does take a bit of practice but it's a quick learning curve and if you have the patience to keep working at it then you will eventually get the "feel" of it. I still have good and bad fondant days (and you will curse the day when you have to work with it and it's raining outside! Humidity is awful for fondant) and there are times when I have realize my limits as a cake artist, the limits of cake and the limits of the fondant but it is my prefered medium over buttercream. Hope this helps!

Cat



Amen Cat!! Bad Fondant days are the best way to either loose hair or turn the dark grey!! But when you have good days with the MMF it's glorious! icon_lol.gif
May I ask you a question? I have had to use Red twice in the last week. The Fondant car I just posted was Friday. How do you keep the stuff from cracking in place? I covered my cake and it was fine but as it dried it started getting fine cracks and some lighter areas where it cracked. If you even touch it it cracks. I might add it was Satin Ice pre-tinted that I used. Pfft I hate using any colored fondant because of the cracking. It also drys very flat in color....any suggestions would greatly be appreciated.
Wittylorrie

catlharper Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 5:52pm
post #6 of 8

When you see the cracks just take a bit of crisco on a fingertip and smooth it into the crack, it helps, really! This also helps if you have a small mark or minor dent in the fondant. The mark or dent may not disappear entirely but it will deminish the appearance greatly. I was working on a wedding cake last week and while trimming the fondant I caught the edge with the pizza wheel...I was panicked! The mark was an inch long and I thought, oh man, gotta reroll that out..but the crisco trick worked and when I was done you could tell there was a mark there only if you really really looked hard...of course that became the BACK of the cake! LOL!

wittylorrie Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 5:59pm
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cat harper

When you see the cracks just take a bit of crisco on a fingertip and smooth it into the crack, it helps, really! This also helps if you have a small mark or minor dent in the fondant. The mark or dent may not disappear entirely but it will diminish the appearance greatly. I was working on a wedding cake last week and while trimming the fondant I caught the edge with the pizza wheel...I was panicked! The mark was an inch long and I thought, oh man, gotta roll that out..but the crisco trick worked and when I was done you could tell there was a mark there only if you really really looked hard...of course that became the BACK of the cake! LOL!



Yea its always a good thing when stuff happens and all of the sudden it can he the backside...Yea on hide and seek! I will try the Crisco next time. What do you do to shine it up a bit. I did notice that when I went to wipe away some spots with a wet brush it dried shiny? So maybe wipe the whole thing down with a little damp cloth to shine flat colors? I always stress out when I know I have to work with colored fondant.
Thanks again Cat.
Wittylorrie

catlharper Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 7:49pm
post #8 of 8

yes, any water will make it a bit shiny. To make it like vinyl or plastic you have to use other means (they have lots of tips in the forums here just search on shiny fondant) but if you want a soft sheen you can also just use the crisco. If you roll it out on a lightly greased board it will be slightly shiny...when you roll it out on PS or CS it softens it up to a powdery soft finish. Just a teeny bit of crisco for a spot or two won't make it too shiny, it tends to just blend in. Have fun...I know I am!

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