Wieghing Vs. Measuring???

Baking By erilay Updated 22 Mar 2010 , 4:16am by mandymakescakes

erilay Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 4:30pm
post #1 of 12

I have a scale and love to wiegh my ingrediants. The only problem is that a lot of the time when I wiegh it is a whole tbs. or 2 less than the measured ingrediants say to do. Which should I follow??? I wonder what I am doing wrond. I have checked my scale with butter and 1lb. = 1lb. so it is correct.
I sift before mesuring when told to and spoon my ingrediants into the measuring cup without pressing.. What is going on. Has anyone had this problem????

11 replies
antonia74 Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 5:13pm
post #2 of 12

Digital scales are the best for accurate weights to the 1/10th decimal. I'd suggest one. thumbs_up.gif They aren't too expensive. I got mine for around $50


If not, try this website. It's great for showing what ingredients should be by volume/weight....


http://www.onlineconversion.com/cooking.htm


icon_smile.gif

erilay Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 5:30pm
post #3 of 12

I have a digital really good scale recomended by the book Cake Bible. It is her book that I am having trouble with. A lot of her wieghed and measured ingrediants listed don't match up. Has anyone had this problem?

erilay Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 5:34pm
post #4 of 12

I have a my wiegh... just checked.
It seems to be acurate. I have hecked it with water. I measured 1/2 cup and it was the correct wieght? I don't know if I should follow her measured or weighed chart for the recipe???? icon_sad.gif

erilay Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 5:54pm
post #5 of 12

Does sifted cake flour wiegh the same as no sifted if it is the same amount.
I like to skip the sift into a cup and then measure. I just weigh it. Is this no good?

I just sifted my coco powder and then measured it and weighed it. It was still off so I am not sure if I am wrong or the book has some errors? Not all the measurements are off but a descent amount are not matching up. This is so annoying... icon_sad.gif

mandymakescakes Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 6:13pm
post #6 of 12

Sifted flour has a different volume (cup) than an equal weight measure (ounce) of unsifted flour, albeit a tiny one, so follow the recipe. If the ingredients list does not specify sifted, then measure straight from your bin and then sift afterwards if noted in the instructions. I use a digital scale whenever possible because it is more accurate than cup measures and I almost always sift my flour whether or not it is called for. I know it is time consuming, but sifting flour helps it to evenly absorb the liquids you are adding. You could also dump it in to a food processor or blender and whirl for a few seconds if you'd prefer. Rose Levy Beranbaum's Cake Bible spends an entire chapter on this, as well as shares a couple of pages of how much different types of flours, sugars, etc should weight as an equivalent to other forms of measurements. It is a GREAT resource!

erilay Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 8:34pm
post #7 of 12

I LOVE THAT book. I am not sure what I am doing wrong. somethings just don't wiegh the same as the measurement.

What I ment was if the recipe say 1 cup sifted flour and says it is 100g. Can I just weigh 100g? WIll it be the same or should I sift first then weigh?

Either way this is not my real problem. Has anyone had this problem with things being listed differantly in a book. My book lists weights and measurements but not all measutrements = the weight they are listed at??? They are over or under by 1-3 tbs. ???

PinkZiab Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 8:44pm
post #8 of 12

Weighing is the most accurate. The weight will always be the same whether it's sifted, not sifted, packed, loosely spooned, whatever. This is the beauty of weighing. 100 grams is 100 grams, no matter how you package it. Five people could all measure "one cup of flour" and wind up with five different amounts of flour. But if your scale is properly calibrated, you can't mess up with weighing. There is a much bigger margin of error when using volume measurements.

leah_s Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 9:01pm
post #9 of 12

There are ONLY four things that have the same volume measure and weight measure - water, whole milk, whole butter and whole eggs.

Which makes a bigger pile - a pound of feathers or a pound of lead balls?

They weigh the same, but their volume is different.

JanH Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 9:39pm
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

Weighing is the most accurate. The weight will always be the same whether it's sifted, not sifted, packed, loosely spooned, whatever. This is the beauty of weighing. 100 grams is 100 grams, no matter how you package it. Five people could all measure "one cup of flour" and wind up with five different amounts of flour. But if your scale is properly calibrated, you can't mess up with weighing. There is a much bigger margin of error when using volume measurements.




Exactly.

erilay Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 10:37pm
post #11 of 12

I love weighing my ingrediants. I have just been checking lately to make sure the measured list is the same as the weighed. Has anyone ever checked the recipies or do you just weigh? I have been checking and a lot of the thime they are way off. I just did a recipe in American Test Kitchen book. It says 8 and 3/4 onces sugar or 1 and 1/4 cup. I measured it and then dumped it onto a bowl on the scale. All I needed was 1 cup 2Tbs. and a pinch more. How can this be so off. It is sugar. It is not like you can pack or over pack sugar. I could see with flour. I guess I should just pay attention to the weights and not worry about the rest. I almost feel like the autors guess sometimes about what the measurement would be bc they go by the weight or they are typos???
I don't know just a guess???

mandymakescakes Posted 22 Mar 2010 , 4:16am
post #12 of 12

erilay, I think I finally understand your question/concern after your last post here and I wonder about that sometimes, too... whether or not the weight and the volume measurements for a particular ingredient are equal. If there are weight measurements, I go with those and don't even pay attention to volume. With the sugar in your example, there may have been a difference between granulated and baker's sugar which is finer... but I'm grasping at straws. I think you have a point about authors, or more likely editors, though. I've been reading some reviews on several different cookbooks I've had my eye on and lack of measurement congruency is a major concern among the reviewers... it's a disturbing trend if it really is one. icon_confused.gif All you can do is test the recipes when you come across questions like this. Make it with the weight measurement and note flavor, texture, crumb, etc., (WRITE ON the recipe). When you make recipe again, use the volume measurement and note again the flavor, texture, crumb, etc... and then compare. This is how I refine recipes I like and turn them into ones that I love. icon_biggrin.gif

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