Petit Four Pricing.

Business By marisanovy Updated 20 Mar 2010 , 12:01am by DefyGravity

marisanovy Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 8:54pm
post #1 of 14

My niece is asking me how much will cost her to have petit four cakes to be served at her wedding.

I can price regular cakes, but haven't made petit fours yet.

How do you guys price them?

Thanks! icon_smile.gif

13 replies
redheadfairy2003 Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 9:25pm
post #2 of 14

I do 1.30 each I just started doing them so that is just a rough price

TexasSugar Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 9:46pm
post #3 of 14

Make a test run of petit fours then figure your pricing. icon_smile.gif

I have always heard they are time consuming and often a pain in the ***. Search on here and I bet you will find many posts that say either I'm never doing these again or I didn't charge enough for them.

The_Lil_Cakehouse Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 9:50pm
post #4 of 14

WOW--$1.30 seems cheap! I'd price them ATLEAST as much as you would a regular serving size of cake. And I'm saying atleast because you're decorating (we'll say 20 for arguments sake) 20 individual cakes!! So it really depends on how much detail work you're going to put in to them. The last time I read a forum on this it seemed like $5 was the least someone who had done them, would do them for. If you ever get on bakerella.com she has a tutorial on how she did some Petit Fours--a very labor intensive order!! But I love the way they look! Especially when someone does like a 6" square as the anniversary cake, and then a "cupcake tower" of Petit Fours under it! Very cool! Good luck!! HTH!!

Edited to add this post for this forum: http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-6738709-.html#6738709

marisanovy Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 9:53pm
post #5 of 14

I'm not sure she wants me to make them. I'm already making her brideshower cake. She just want to get an estimate, because she went to another decorator (a licensed one, being that I'm not licensed, yet!), and she got a very high quote.

And that got me curious too! But I can imagine that it is a real PITB to make them small things!

marisanovy Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 9:54pm
post #6 of 14

Cakehouse, that makes a lot of sense! Thanks!

leah_s Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 10:26pm
post #7 of 14

As I always answer to this question, Petit fours are $8371294067183254 each. Would you like to order a dozen?

Seriously, I quote $6 each. That way I don't get the order.

Loucinda Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 11:06pm
post #8 of 14

I agree with all the above - they are a PAIN to make. I think it is indy that says "something that is 5 times as small should cost 5 times as much to make" - so true of these little buggars.

Make them first, THEN decide what you would charge for them.

redheadfairy2003 Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 1:52am
post #9 of 14

I have only done them once and it was a small order.... Im sure the bigger the order and more details that they want then it would be a PIA...... I do agree that if I was asked to do them again seeing the prices you all quote I might go alittle higher but not much ... our market here would not support it.. Thanks for the info everyone

Sagebrush Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 6:48am
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by redheadfairy2003

I do agree that if I was asked to do them again seeing the prices you all quote I might go alittle higher but not much ... our market here would not support it.




The question is, why do you CARE that the market would not support it?

If you hate doing them, then you price them such that either 1) you get enough to make it worth the time AND frustration that they cost you, or 2) they decide not to go that route.

If the market doesn't support a fancy steak joint, you offer pizza, not fancy steak at pizza prices.

If the market won't support the sale of high end jewelry, you aren't going to see the jeweler say hey, well, I'll just mark the high end jewelry down so that the locals can get high quality diamonds at cubic zirconia prices... they'll offer CZ jewelry only.

You aren't a charity, your job is not to make fancy things available cheaply for those who wouldn't buy them at fair market value. That way lies burnout. You only do it if they are willing to pay you what it would take for it to be worth it to you to do.

heavenlys Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 11:56am
post #11 of 14

I am in a small town in Iowa and I price mine at $18/dz. undecorated. MIne are around the size of a mini muffin. Super pain to make for sure.

Bluehue Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 8:24pm
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagebrush

Quote:
Originally Posted by redheadfairy2003

I do agree that if I was asked to do them again seeing the prices you all quote I might go alittle higher but not much ... our market here would not support it.



The question is, why do you CARE that the market would not support it?

If you hate doing them, then you price them such that either 1) you get enough to make it worth the time AND frustration that they cost you, or 2) they decide not to go that route.

If the market doesn't support a fancy steak joint, you offer pizza, not fancy steak at pizza prices.

If the market won't support the sale of high end jewelry, you aren't going to see the jeweler say hey, well, I'll just mark the high end jewelry down so that the locals can get high quality diamonds at cubic zirconia prices... they'll offer CZ jewelry only.

You aren't a charity, your job is not to make fancy things available cheaply for those who wouldn't buy them at fair market value. That way lies burnout. You only do it if they are willing to pay you what it would take for it to be worth it to you to do.






Goodgrief - icon_surprised.gificon_surprised.gif - inbetween the pizzas, the steak, being a charity, the jewelry and the *if you hate doing them* icon_eek.gificon_confused.gificon_confused.gif..... i think the dear little petit fours got lost -
Ar least RHF stayed on track with her responses - and made sense instead of being rude.

Bluehue

tatorchip Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 11:58pm
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagebrush

Quote:
Originally Posted by redheadfairy2003

I do agree that if I was asked to do them again seeing the prices you all quote I might go alittle higher but not much ... our market here would not support it.



The question is, why do you CARE that the market would not support it?

If you hate doing them, then you price them such that either 1) you get enough to make it worth the time AND frustration that they cost you, or 2) they decide not to go that route.

If the market doesn't support a fancy steak joint, you offer pizza, not fancy steak at pizza prices.

If the market won't support the sale of high end jewelry, you aren't going to see the jeweler say hey, well, I'll just mark the high end jewelry down so that the locals can get high quality diamonds at cubic zirconia prices... they'll offer CZ jewelry only.

You aren't a charity, your job is not to make fancy things available cheaply for those who wouldn't buy them at fair market value. That way lies burnout. You only do it if they are willing to pay you what it would take for it to be worth it to you to do.




redheadfairy, you did not deserve to be pointed out as you were. If you think that your price is a bit low then raise it . I also agree they are a pita to make but you are the one that has the knowledge of your area and the right to charge what you want to charge without being belittled, advice can be given without that many examples as if you were a child.

DefyGravity Posted 20 Mar 2010 , 12:01am
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

As I always answer to this question, Petit fours are $8371294067183254 each. Would you like to order a dozen?

Seriously, I quote $6 each. That way I don't get the order.




I think you mean $8371294067183254 when they're on clearance.

I made some for the first time last weekend and wanted to stab myself in the face repeatedly the entire time... and I only made 4.

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