Difference Between Lard And Shortening

Decorating By nechee Updated 22 Mar 2010 , 1:38pm by Adevag

nechee Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 5:45pm
post #1 of 36

I know this will sound like a silly question to some but I know that there are no silly questions. What is the difference between lard and shortening? I have a big tub of lard and would like to know what I can use it for. Can I use it in place of shortening for icing? Any help here is greatly appreciated.

35 replies
deah Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 5:52pm
post #2 of 36

Lard is pork fat while shortening (like Crisco) is vegetable fat. I would not use it in my icing. My grandmother used to use lard in her buttermilk biscuits.

Here's more info-
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-lard.htm

TitiaM Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 5:56pm
post #3 of 36

Lard is animal (pig) fat, and shortening is vegetable fat. Lard is not used much anymore because it is very high in saturated fat. It is great for pie crust--makes a very flaky crust. I don't think I would use it for icing--it can have a distinct flavor of its own.

BARBARAJEAN Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 5:58pm
post #4 of 36

My mother used lard for her pie crust. It was very flakey. Biscuits too.
She used it to fry stuff in that she did not want to stick in the pan, like fried potatoes. I think back in the day they used it all the time.

auzzi Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 1:19am
post #5 of 36

Shortening is a fat or oil - lard, butter, margarine, oleo, and every edible oil [both solid of liquid] is a shortening. It can be made of purely or either an animal or vegetable product or a mixture of both.

Lard is a shortening that is a pure animal fat: generally pork, if you are American: usually beef, if you are Australian: mostly, any animal that is edible. Chicken fat is also a lard.

tesso Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 1:25am
post #6 of 36

Since your OP was answered I will just add this...

What ever you do.. please PLEASE do not use LARD to make your icing !! I know for a fact that it is hideous!!! my wedding cake.. the woman used lard and NO ONE could eat it. GAG..just thinking about it.

It was my wedding cake that got me into making cakes.. I never wanted another bride to be so disappointed in her wedding cake as i was. It wasnt even decorated like I ordered either. icon_sad.gif

prterrell Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 1:58am
post #7 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by auzzi

Lard is a shortening that is a pure animal fat: generally pork, if you are American: usually beef, if you are Australian: mostly, any animal that is edible. Chicken fat is also a lard.




I thought chicken fat was schmaltz and beef fat was suet?

Doug Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 2:21am
post #8 of 36

frying kind of beef fat is tallow which is purified from suet. (suet being raw unprocessed beef fat and more for feeding to birds and such)

icon_cry.gif and McD's no longer cooks their fries in tallow! icon_cry.gif and there goes another great food!

prterrell Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 1:53am
post #9 of 36

Doug, according to Jeffrey Steingarten, the best fries are fried in horse fat. My DH really wants to try that one day. Me, I'll stick to peanut oil. icon_biggrin.gif

Doug Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 2:06am
post #10 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Doug, according to Jeffrey Steingarten, the best fries are fried in horse fat. My DH really wants to try that one day. Me, I'll stick to peanut oil. icon_biggrin.gif




horse fat?!?!?!? so no going there.

tho' peanut oil fries do sound interesting.

kellertur Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 2:20am
post #11 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

frying kind of beef fat is tallow which is purified from suet. (suet being raw unprocessed beef fat and more for feeding to birds and such)

icon_cry.gif and McD's no longer cooks their fries in tallow! icon_cry.gif and there goes another great food!




This is because they lied and claimed their fries were "vegetarian" (mod edited). ~ I don't eat fast food, so I'm sorry if this seems insensitive toward your post Doug...not intended. icon_smile.gif

madgeowens Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 2:22am
post #12 of 36

Buddy on Cake Boss uses lard to deep fry his cannoli's I believe he said....and they are really freaking gooooooooooood.....I just quit taking my zocor too hahaha....yikes, no more cannoli for Nanna

Doug Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 2:23am
post #13 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by kellertur

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

frying kind of beef fat is tallow which is purified from suet. (suet being raw unprocessed beef fat and more for feeding to birds and such)

icon_cry.gif and McD's no longer cooks their fries in tallow! icon_cry.gif and there goes another great food!



This is because they lied and claimed their fries were "vegetarian" (mod edited) ~ I don't eat fast food, so I'm sorry if this seems insensitive toward your post Doug...not intended. icon_smile.gif




oh, I knew about that and the whole lawsuit.

but....there are times when I'm AGAINST accommodating, when I feel it IS appropriate to say "well, I guess my product is just not for you."

Reneesg Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 2:27am
post #14 of 36

Doug you can use your lard to make homemade flour tortillas. They don't taste the same without it.

kellertur Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 2:29am
post #15 of 36

I agree Doug, because accomodating isn't always the best answer.
BUT, companies should have been honest... if people ask, they should get the truth. icon_smile.gif

madgeowens Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 2:56am
post #16 of 36

and there you are..............I rest my case....moderator edited everything lol

madgeowens Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 4:02am
post #17 of 36

lol

auzzi Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 12:25pm
post #18 of 36

Schmaltz or schmalz is rendered chicken or goose fat ie lard.

Suet is beef or lamb fat, ie lard, found around the animals' loins and kidneys. Kidney suet is more common - pure white with little flavour.

Tallow is a rendered or melted-down suet.

Many cultures eat horse: just like others eat dog, cat, cavy [guinea pig], rat, possum, moose, buffalo, elephant, etc... We are demonstrably opportunistic omnivores ...

tiers2you Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 2:24pm
post #19 of 36

mmmmmmmm, try making pork tamales with that lard. Alton Brown has an amazing recipe for it.

Solecito Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 4:46pm
post #20 of 36

Shortening is for icing...
Lard is for beans, tamales, pies....

prterrell Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 8:44pm
post #21 of 36

[quote="Doug"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

tho' peanut oil fries do sound interesting.




Doug, ever eaten at Chick-fil-A? They use peanut oil for all of their frying. (As does Five Guys, the best darn hamburger 'n fries joint around!) Peanut oil has a higher smoke point than corn, soy, or canola oils, thus it is better suited for frying. We use it exclusively at our house for all deep-frying. It does not have a peanut taste to it.

tavyheather Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 10:32pm
post #22 of 36

makes fantastic buttermilk pie crust icon_wink.gif or any pie crust for that matter...

b/c of the almost zero percent water content when it cooks it creates pockets of air (ie. flakes in pie crust) which make for a very flaky crust..

tavyheather Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 10:34pm
post #23 of 36

[quote="prterrell"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

tho' peanut oil fries do sound interesting.



Doug, ever eaten at Chick-fil-A? They use peanut oil for all of their frying. (As does Five Guys, the best darn hamburger 'n fries joint around!) Peanut oil has a higher smoke point than corn, soy, or canola oils, thus it is better suited for frying. We use it exclusively at our house for all deep-frying. It does not have a peanut taste to it.




heard about this and want to try it for my fried chkn...where do u buy it in a big enough size for deep-frying? (I've seen small bottles for $8 icon_surprised.gif )

Doug Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 10:45pm
post #24 of 36

[quote="tavyheather"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

tho' peanut oil fries do sound interesting.



Doug, ever eaten at Chick-fil-A? They use peanut oil for all of their frying. (As does Five Guys, the best darn hamburger 'n fries joint around!) Peanut oil has a higher smoke point than corn, soy, or canola oils, thus it is better suited for frying. We use it exclusively at our house for all deep-frying. It does not have a peanut taste to it.



heard about this and want to try it for my fried chkn...where do u buy it in a big enough size for deep-frying? (I've seen small bottles for $8 icon_surprised.gif )




yes to chick-fil-a, tho' didn't notice any big difference other than near choking on the price.

>> check for big containers of peanut oil at Loews and Home Depot of all places next to the turkey fryers or anywhere else that sells those little machines from heaven! (OH MY HEAVENS is turkey fried in peanut oil good good good G O O D GOOD!)

>>yep, know all about the various smoke points on oils -- tho to quote Rachel Ray -- love my EVOO (you're talking to someone who started learning to cook at 4, used to sit and watch ORIGINAL French Chef episodes, yellow note pad in hand... and grew up with a can for bacon grease on the stove -- it was NOT thrown out but used for just about anything we could could it in (anyone care for wilted dandelion greens?)

tavyheather Posted 19 Mar 2010 , 10:55pm
post #25 of 36

saweeeeeeet! thanks! Never in a million years did I think to check Lowes...was in there 3 times last week, too...DIY cake board fiasco...

prterrell Posted 20 Mar 2010 , 4:45am
post #26 of 36

We buy ours (peanut oil) at BJ's wholesale club.

tavyheather Posted 20 Mar 2010 , 9:28pm
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

We buy ours (peanut oil) at BJ's wholesale club.




no idea who that is...we must be deprived in CA icon_wink.gif

prterrell Posted 20 Mar 2010 , 10:30pm
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by tavyheather

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

We buy ours (peanut oil) at BJ's wholesale club.



no idea who that is...we must be deprived in CA icon_wink.gif




It's like Sam's Club or Cost-Co.

madgeowens Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 2:36am
post #29 of 36

I think the difference is..........no one has ever called me shortening............hehehe

anamado Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 2:58am
post #30 of 36

Lard is the fat that can handle the highest temperature without burning itself...
I use it for making the profiteroles dough. It's also wonderful to cover lamb and other meats to roast. Mix all the spices and salt on the lard and then rub the meat with it. It's wonderful.
And I have read that is the best thing to deep fry rosettes.

Shortening is a hydrogenated fat. Very handy, great results but very VERY HARMFUL to your health. This is the nurse speaking icon_smile.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%