Crisco In Satin Ice To Prevent Wrinkling?

Decorating By erilay Updated 22 Mar 2010 , 7:49pm by Christy0722

erilay Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 5:57am
post #1 of 18

has anyone ever worked crisco into SAtin Ice to get it from wrinkling?

17 replies
LateBloomer Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 6:54am
post #2 of 18

I once attended a photo session where a sugarart teacher was covering cakes for a photo shoot.
I was amazed to watch her easy way with fondant. She had a bottle of cooking oil and CMC powder. If the paste was too soft and would add CMC powder - about a tablespoon for a normal size cake - I always religiously use 1 tsp per 100gm - she just turned over the jar.
If the paste was too dry she would add cooking oil.
What I learned that day was dont be scared of fondant. Add your CMC powder or any other stiffening powder if its too soft and add your crisco if its too dry.

Mug-a-Bug Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 2:17pm
post #3 of 18

Thanks for the tip. What is CMC powder? Tylose??

BlakesCakes Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 3:55am
post #4 of 18

Yes, CMC is the same as tylose.

You're supposed to knead in a bit of white vegetable fat (crisco, hi ratio, etc.) when getting your fondant ready for rolling.

You can use crisco on your fingers to smooth elephant skin, wrinkles, etc. It will stay on the surface of the fondant for up to 24hrs., though, so you have to be careful with painting and dusting.

Rae

Mug-a-Bug Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 2:07pm
post #5 of 18

Thanks. I use satin ice and always get elephant skin. icon_cry.gif Should I add more crisco? I usually rub a little before kneading out. Maybe I'm just too slow? (Sorry, I'm a thread hijacker)

erilay Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 7:30pm
post #6 of 18

Good to know I am not the only one icon_biggrin.gif . I thought Satin Ice would be so easy to use. I am going to try crisco or veg oil this week. Thanks for the help. About a table spoon u think?
I added cornstarch once to thicken it and it made a wrinkled mess. I still have that fondant on the bucket for figures maybe but I can not use it for a cake.

BlakesCakes Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 11:15pm
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by erilay

Good to know I am not the only one icon_biggrin.gif . I thought would be so easy to use. I am going to try crisco or veg oil this week. Thanks for the help. About a table spoon u think?
I added cornstarch once to thicken it and it made a wrinkled mess. I still have that fondant on the bucket for figures maybe but I can not use it for a cake.




Cornstarch is a drying agent. It should be used sparingly and it can mold if exposed to moisture in the fondant.

Please don't use liquid vegetable oil. You'll just have a mess on your hands. Pre-made fondant really can't take having loads of extra liquid added to it.

You shouldn't need to knead in more than a 1/4 tsp./pound. I dip my index finger into the crisco, come up with a covered finger tip, and rub it on my hands then knead the fondant. Don't add it all at once. Do it by feel. Some days it needs more, some less.

You can definitely put in too much crisco. It will ruin the balance in the fondant and even though it may roll out OK, it will crack & tear easily with too much crisco in it.

HTH
Rae

tsal Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 11:35pm
post #8 of 18

I only use Satin Ice and since I've been working Crisco into it, my fondant looks amazing. It really makes a difference. Just be careful not to use too much Crisco or it will alter the consistency.

erilay Posted 20 Mar 2010 , 5:16am
post #9 of 18

thanks so muh for the tips. I am glad you mentioned the oil thing. I was wondering but curious to try. THanks so much. I hate wasting time and products. I use crisco on my hands and counter. Not a lot but maybe too much???? I am considering making my own real fondant. Does anyone know if home-made is nicer to work with? I read it does not crust bc it does not have an tylose in it like store bough. DOn't know if it is true or not though. thanks...

Mug-a-Bug Posted 20 Mar 2010 , 12:54pm
post #10 of 18

I used MMF a couple of times. It is tasty and doesn't get as crusty, but I found it too inconsistent and difficult to work with... and way too sticky. But, I guess it's probably just one of those things you have to perfect and since I hated making it, it wasn't worth it to me.

Christy0722 Posted 20 Mar 2010 , 1:25pm
post #11 of 18

Since I started making my own MMF I don't use anything else. I used to use Satin Ice but it was so expensive and the closest supply store is 2 hours away. It is just alot easier to make my own. It is very simple and I do mine in my KA mixer with a dough hook. Takes out 90% of the work! I also like that I can color mine during the melting process and not have to do all the kneading! Also, I can add different flavorings to change things up. I won't use anything else!
Not alot of people in my area like fondant but since I switched to MMF, I have had more and more people request it.

Mug-a-Bug Posted 20 Mar 2010 , 1:32pm
post #12 of 18

MMF is much tastier than other fondant. I haven't tried to make it in my kitchenaid (I'm scared to break it). Ugh, okay, you twisted my arm - I'm going to try making this again. It's always SO sticky that I can barely work with it - should I be adding the whole bag of PS or not?? icon_confused.gif

cblupe Posted 20 Mar 2010 , 2:01pm
post #13 of 18

Christy0722 would you mind sharing your MMF recipe with me and tips on using your KA to make it??? Please and thank you.

Carol

Mug-a-Bug Posted 20 Mar 2010 , 2:03pm
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by cblupe

Christy0722 would you mind sharing your MMF recipe with me and tips on using your KA to make it??? Please and thank you.

Carol




Ditto, I'd love to know too!! Thanks.

erilay Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 12:40am
post #15 of 18

I think mmf is too sweet and chewy. I usse the standard recipe with 1lb. mm, about 1 and 1/2 lbs. sugar, 2 tbs. water and flavor. I play with the amount of sugar based on the day, but I have to put it on thick to make it look smooth and nince. It is also gets divits or dimples in it sometimes that I hate. Like little pores on the finished cake.

Christy0722 Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 5:36am
post #16 of 18

I would love to share! Some people melt their marshmallows in the microwave in a glass bowl. I prefer to do mine by double boiler method so I can control them a little more.

15 oz mini marshmallows
3 tablespoons water
1 tablespoon clear vanilla (or your choice of flavoring)
1/2 tablespoon butter flavor
2 pounds of powdered sugar
shortening to grease bowl and dough hook

Grease your mixing bowl and dough hook very well with shortening. Put 1 3/4 pounds of powdered sugar in the bowl. Make a well in the center.
Melt the marshmallows in the liquids. Color once the mixture is melted. If using a large amount of 1 color, it is much easier to color at this point. Once melted, pour into the well of powdered sugar. It will probably run over the powdered sugar but that's ok. Put mixer on "2" and mix for a couple of minutes. Sugar will be on the sides of the bowl but don't scrap it down. After a couple of minutes check the dough. It may still be sticky to the touch at this point. If so, add a small amount of powdered sugar and continue to mix. Repeat until dough is firm and not sticky to the touch. Depending on the humidity where you live, you may or may not use the enitre amount of sugar. I'm in NC and I normally use it all.
Once the surface of mixture is firm and not sticky to the touch, turn out onto work surface well dusted with powdered sugar. Knead until it is it is no longer sticky. (This is when I have to use the remaining sugar.) Double wrap with plastic wrap and place into large ziplock bag. It will still be soft at this point. It will firm up overnight. I make mine the night before I need it. HTH!!

Mug-a-Bug Posted 21 Mar 2010 , 2:16pm
post #17 of 18

Thanks for sharing that with us!! icon_biggrin.gif I don't believe I have every had it spelled out for me. The 2 times I have made it before it was SO sticky I could barely cover the cake! But I wasn't using the entire bag of PS. Okay, I'm going to try this again. I never got lumps, bumps, or pock marks though, thankfully. Maybe that has to do with the humidity level?? icon_confused.gif I live in CO and it's really dry here. Is it hard on your KA? Mine is on the fritz. Wish me luck. thumbs_up.gif

Christy0722 Posted 22 Mar 2010 , 7:49pm
post #18 of 18

I have found that sometimes I use the entire amount of PS and sometimes I don't. It all depends on the humidity. Sometimes I have to use a little more. It's not an "exact science". You kinda have to go by "feel". Hope it works out for you! Don't give up!! icon_wink.gificon_wink.gif

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