1.5 X 2 X 4" Serving Guide...please?

Decorating By kellertur Updated 14 Mar 2010 , 4:35pm by kellertur

kellertur Posted 12 Mar 2010 , 2:27am
post #1 of 17

This is NOT a pricing question. icon_wink.gif

I have the wilton chart which is 1x2x4, but I'm weighing the pros and cons of moving up slightly size to 1.5 x 2 x 4" due to all the birthday cakes I make. While I think the wedding serving is a healthy slice of cake for anyone (especially now with so much emphasis on staying/getting healthy...) others disagree... To me, cake is a special treat but some of my customers eat multiple slices. potato/potahto.

I'm charging the same base price either way, I just would really like to know if there is a sizing/serving chart for this size.

I've seen charts for:
1x2x4, 2x2x2, and 2x3x4...but not 1.5 x 2 x 4

Thank you. icon_smile.gif

16 replies
prterrell Posted 12 Mar 2010 , 2:35am
post #2 of 17

Just do the math.

Determine the surface area of the cake:
for square and rectangular cakes, multiply the length of one side by the length of the adjoining side
for round cakes, multiply the radius (the distance from the center to edge) by itself and then multiply that product by pi (3.14)

Then divide the surface area of the cake by the surface area of your serving size (for a 1.5"x2" serving, the surface area is 3)

kellertur Posted 12 Mar 2010 , 2:41am
post #3 of 17

Errrrr.....I was an art major. icon_confused.gif

I'm very smart, and thank you... icon_smile.gif but I just panicked when I saw that.

I just want to make sure I was understood and asked the right questions:

I am looking for a sheet that tells me what size cake I will need for X amount of servings for 1.5 x 2 x 4. Is this where your formula comes in handy? If so, I will give it a go... I'm a visual person and I guess I took for granted there would be a chart. icon_redface.gif

Thank you for your patience. icon_smile.gif

prterrell Posted 12 Mar 2010 , 3:05am
post #4 of 17

LOL I understand! I was an English major, but I tutor kids in all subjects and have been forced to reteach myself a lot of math! icon_biggrin.gif

I'm not sure if there is a serving chart or not. There probably is, but I don't have a link to it. I just wanted to give you the tools to create your own if you are unable to locate one. KWIM?

The formulas I gave you will tell you how many servings each cake (or tier of cake) will give.

So, for example, for a 9x13x4 cake:
Find the surface area by multiplying 9x13 = 117
Then divide the surface area of the cake by the surface area of a serving: 117 divided by 3 = 39
So a 9x13x4 cake will give 39 1.5x2x4 servings

for an 8x8x4 square cake:
Find the surface area by multiplying 8x8 = 64
Then divide the surface area of the cake by the surface area of a serving: 64 divided by 3 = 21
So a square 8x8x4 cake will give 21 1.5x2x4 servings

for an 8"x4" round cake:
We call round cakes by the diameter (length from side to side) of the cake. The radius is equal to half of the diameter. So, to find the radius of an 8" round cake, divide 8 by 2, which equals 4. So the radius of an 8" round cake is 4.
To find the surface area, square the radius (multiply it by itself)-- 4x4 =16 --then multiply that answer by pi (3.14)-- 16x3.14 = 50.24
Then divide the surface area of the cake by the surface area of a serving: 50.24 divided by 3 = 16
So an 8"x4" round cake will give 16 1.5x2x4 servings

I hope that helps!

kellertur Posted 12 Mar 2010 , 3:08am
post #5 of 17

Thank you...that was generous! I do have the photo someone (MIKE?) posted of the chunks of cake cut out of wood...and I plan to do that to show my customers size.

I'll try that formula, but if anyone comes across a guide, please post it.

Thank you. icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 12 Mar 2010 , 3:49pm
post #6 of 17

Wilton has a Party serving guide too, that are bigger pieces.

kellertur Posted 12 Mar 2010 , 7:00pm
post #7 of 17

Thanks Texas. The problem is that the party size is too big...I need the one for in between. The "goldilocks" chart. icon_surprised.gif)

pattycakesnj Posted 12 Mar 2010 , 7:32pm
post #8 of 17

The wilton chart I have has the party size as 1 1/2 by 2 by 4 (not 2 by 2 by 4)
If you can't find it, pm me and I can scan and email it to you but it comes right out of wilton yearbooks

TexasSugar Posted 12 Mar 2010 , 8:03pm
post #9 of 17

"Serving amounts are based on party-sized portions of approximately 1.5 x 2 in."

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

kellertur Posted 13 Mar 2010 , 12:51am
post #10 of 17

Thank you...I guess the chart I have is a dinosaur. icon_confused.gif

Are you cutting the 6" in rows or like a pie? I always thought the 6" was cut like a pie...but I think I'm wrong for 12 servings... Thank you. icon_surprised.gif)

Oh, and are the corner pieces always smaller??? They look smaller (for round cakes) in the guides.

Thank you. icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 13 Mar 2010 , 1:54am
post #11 of 17

If I was cutting it family style I'd cut wedges, but for parties and weddings I'd suggest using IndyDebi's Cutting menthod. She cuts in straight rows rather than around the circle.

indydebi Posted 13 Mar 2010 , 5:21am
post #12 of 17

No matter what size you cut them, here is a guide on HOW to cut round and square cakes: http://www.cateritsimple.com/id10.html

If you are going to offer larger servings as your standard, be prepared to do a lot of explaining. FIrst, if your standard price is, for example, $3/serving for a 1x2x4" piece, then your new standard of 1.5x2x4 should be priced at $4.50/serving. The cost of the cake remains the same ... lower number of servings x higher price per serving = same total on the invoice. But be sure to explain your pieces are bigger. Every. Single. Time.

You say the reasoning is that your cakes are a lot of birthday cakes. I say, "So what?"

A 10" round serves 38 by the wilton chart. I tell the client, "This will serve 25 to 35 depending on how you cut it and the total price for the cake is $105." (35 servings x $3/serving). Just because they cut big pieces is no reason for me to take a hit pricewise on it. They can cut the dang thing in half for all I care. They are paying for 35 pieces.

Jemoiselle Posted 13 Mar 2010 , 6:18am
post #13 of 17

Indydebi, always a pleasure reading your replies =) *snickers* I must agree, keep it simple for you and your customers as a safe option. Show them the serving size you go by, they can do the rest with regards to how many times they go back for more! Hehe.

pattycakesnj Posted 13 Mar 2010 , 2:05pm
post #14 of 17

So Indydebi, if I am reading your reply correctly, you pick a standard size piece of cake, (whatever size you decide whether it be 1x2x4 or 2x2x4 etc) and stick with it for any cake, wedding or birthday when you quote a price? So a 2 tiered cake is the same price for everyone (assuming decorations are equal), even though a wedding venue may get more slices because they are cutting it smaller?
My prices are the same, it doesn't go by the occasion, but the same size cake comes out price wise differently because I use different size slices for wedding vs party.
I am going to have to revamp my thinking, I like the idea of sticking with 1 size for all cakes, what size do you recommend be the standard?

prterrell Posted 13 Mar 2010 , 5:06pm
post #15 of 17

1x2x4 is plenty of cake for one person, that's 8 inches of cake!

2x2x4 is 16 inches of cake. No one needs to eat 16 inches of cake!

The 2x2 slice is meant for 2" high cakes (comes out to 8 inches of cake, same as the 1x2x4 cut).

indydebi Posted 13 Mar 2010 , 5:45pm
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by pattycakesnj

So Indydebi, if I am reading your reply correctly, you pick a standard size piece of cake, (whatever size you decide whether it be 1x2x4 or 2x2x4 etc) and stick with it for any cake, wedding or birthday when you quote a price? So a 2 tiered cake is the same price for everyone (assuming decorations are equal), even though a wedding venue may get more slices because they are cutting it smaller?




KFC sells a bucket of 12 pcs of chicken for, let's say, $12. KFC advertises that it "serves 6". That means KFC has determined that a serving size is 2 pieces of chicken. That means KFC is, in fact, selling this bucket of chicken for $2 per serving.

Debi buys a bucket of chicken, but Debi's family eats like Jethro Bodine and each person will eat 3 pieces of chicken. That means Debi will only get 4 servings out of this bucket.

Does Debi get to buy it for $8? No, she still has to pay the full $12 beause the bucket is DESIGNED to serve 6 and she's getting the same amount of chicken.

Sally JO buys the bucket of chicken and her family is always on a diet, so they only eat one piece of chicken each. Does she have to pay more .... $24 ... because she's serving 12 people instead of 6? No, beause she's getting the same number of pieces of chicken.

It doesn't matter to me or to you how many pieces they actually get out of the cake. You and I have predetermined a standard serving size and that's what we base our pricing on. They can cut the cake in half and pass out 2 forks if they want but they are paying for the full 35 servings that the 10" cake is designed to serve.

BTW, a small can of Campbell's soup says it's 2.5 servings. Right! On WHAT planet!? Do I get it cheaper because I have a bigger appetite and the can really only serves one? no ... I plan ahead and buy the bigger can.

kellertur Posted 14 Mar 2010 , 4:35pm
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

No matter what size you cut them, here is a guide on HOW to cut round and square cakes: http://www.cateritsimple.com/id10.html

If you are going to offer larger servings as your standard, be prepared to do a lot of explaining. FIrst, if your standard price is, for example, $3/serving for a 1x2x4" piece, then your new standard of 1.5x2x4 should be priced at $4.50/serving. The cost of the cake remains the same ... lower number of servings x higher price per serving = same total on the invoice. But be sure to explain your pieces are bigger. Every. Single. Time.

You say the reasoning is that your cakes are a lot of birthday cakes. I say, "So what?"

A 10" round serves 38 by the wilton chart. I tell the client, "This will serve 25 to 35 depending on how you cut it and the total price for the cake is $105." (35 servings x $3/serving). Just because they cut big pieces is no reason for me to take a hit pricewise on it. They can cut the dang thing in half for all I care. They are paying for 35 pieces.




I agree, and actually would like to only have one size...as a previous post I made aasked, and after reading some of the responses about cutting 6" cakes into square pieces, that might solve my problem. icon_smile.gif I am so tired of customers complaining that the cakes are too small before it's even cut...I noticed whwen I cut the 6" like pie, the slices LOOK small, but whe I cut it horizontally they look substantial. Maybe this has been my problem all along..not having a guide that better shows how the customer can cut the cake to fit the servings they need. If that makes sense... NOt to mention my competition gives cake away, which is their choice...I just dont' need to hear abou it, when my costs are higher. Thank yoiu.

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