How Do You Keep Your Cupcakes From Drying Out?

Baking By cai0311 Updated 23 Mar 2010 , 3:19pm by PinkLisa

cai0311 Posted 9 Mar 2010 , 8:14pm
post #1 of 11

I know, keep them in an air tight container.

But, what happens when you have a large order and do not have an air tight container large enough to fit all of them? When I do a swirl style icing on top, the top outside edge of the cupcakes is not completely covered - which causes it to dry out.

What about when the cupcakes are covered in fondant? Then they can't be stored in an air tight container because the fondant turns "limpy".

10 replies
DetailsByDawn Posted 11 Mar 2010 , 3:52am
post #2 of 11

Hmmmm. I store my decorated cupcakes in either cupcake carriers or cake boxes with cupcake inserts. I've never had a dry cupcake - always super moist! For fondant topped cupcakes, I prop the box open slightly or put a spoon under the lid of the carrier. I think as long as there's not an abundance of circulating air around your cupcakes, they're not going to dry out at a quick pace. The humidity in my house is usually a bit on the higher side too, which may play a part. This probably didn't help you much, sorry. LOL. Good luck with your cupcakes!

cai0311 Posted 11 Mar 2010 , 12:55pm
post #3 of 11

If my cupcakes are stored in boxes, they dry out really fast. I just don't get it. The cupcakes are very moist before they go in the box, but after 24hrs of not being in an air tight container, hard as a rock.

This is really an issue when I have fondant covered cupcakes because there is so much time spent deocrating them, I have to start a couple days before they are due.

No one else has this problem?

kileyscakes Posted 11 Mar 2010 , 6:14pm
post #4 of 11

I would just go buy a couple large rubbermaid containers with lid and keep them in there until right before delivery. I noticed when I have my cupcakes set out after baking until I get them frosted the edges get a little dry but then after they are covered they moisten back up again. I always think the cupcakes taste better the day after I baked and frosted them.
hth
Kiley

Toptier Posted 11 Mar 2010 , 11:51pm
post #5 of 11

I have often wondered about this too. I have, occasion, brushed the tops of my cupcakes with simplesyrup or melted and thinned jam - apricot typically. This seals the moisture in. I wonder if anyone using the air-tight box has tried putting some moisture into the box? I know when I have to soften up dried out brown sugar I put a piece of cut apple in the bag and seal it, it softens up beautifully. I wonder if you could do the same thing in a box holding cupcakes? I might have to give it a try next time.

DetailsByDawn Posted 12 Mar 2010 , 12:00am
post #6 of 11

Toptier, I love the apple idea - definitely something to try!!

If you can get your hands on a very large rubbermaid tote (180L+) that has square corners, you could certainly store your cupcake boxes in them, stacked without damage. This should help with the drying factor. I hate to bring this possibility up, but could it be your recipe? Maybe it's just a recipe that's prone to drying out - i.e. one made without the addition of oil or something? Just a thought, though I'm sure they're yummy!!

tm-treats Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 6:41pm
post #7 of 11

Hi!

Maybe this will help:

The key to a moist cupcake is keeping the moisture in. This is the reason why you keep it in an airtight container. Spraying / "painting" it with sugar syrup or jam (as suggest in this post) will also do the trick.

Another thing I've tried is using a chocolate ganache to cover the top of the cupcake. Since ganache is mainly melted chocolate, it seals the moisture of the cupcake sponge from the top while the greaseproof paper will keep it sealed from sides and bottom. This method is great for fondant covereed cupcakes! The only problem I see with this is the chocolate flavour. Some may not like chocolates and prefer buttercream instead.

My cupcake stayed moist for at least 2 days.

HTH!


I've used this method before the the cupcake stayed moist.

sweetstellatreats Posted 17 Mar 2010 , 8:28pm
post #8 of 11

I've also heard to brush a syrup over the top to lock in moisture....you can google vanilla syprup and make it yourself. ..another way is to put them in the cardboard boxes and then wrap that in saran wrap....i've had the drying out problem too....
i have seen a big difference in my moisture when i stopped timing my cupckaes...instead, i bring them out as SOON as the toothpick is clean.... seriously, you would be amazed...sometimes they don't look done b/c they aren't brown, but if they are done, they are DONE!

bonniebakes Posted 18 Mar 2010 , 11:27am
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by tm-treats



Another thing I've tried is using a chocolate ganache to cover the top of the cupcake. Since ganache is mainly melted chocolate, it seals the moisture of the cupcake sponge from the top while the greaseproof paper will keep it sealed from sides and bottom. This method is great for fondant covereed cupcakes! The only problem I see with this is the chocolate flavour. Some may not like chocolates and prefer buttercream instead.

My cupcake stayed moist for at least 2 days.
.





Great idea - I've done this with cakes and I love the ganache.

But, I've always kept the cake in the refrigerator after covering it with ganache. Can it be left at room temp with a ganache covering?

thanks!!

cai0311 Posted 23 Mar 2010 , 2:58pm
post #10 of 11

Thanks for all the suggestions.

I don't think it is the recipe because this happens to any cupcake I make. I will try the syrup the suggestion.

I want to stay away from ganache because chocolate may not work with the flavor combo, or the customer may not like chocolate.

This really only becomes a problem when I have to decorate with fondant because I can't store the cupcakes in an air tight container.

PinkLisa Posted 23 Mar 2010 , 3:19pm
post #11 of 11

When I made 600 mini cupcakes, I stored them on large aluminum trays covered with plastic wrap. I then iced them the last day and cooled them right before I put the plastic wrap back on (in order to harden up the icing so it would get messed up by the plastic. They all stayed super moist.

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