What Do I Put Between Tiers..............

Decorating By Jen80 Updated 2 Apr 2010 , 7:40am by Jen80

Jen80 Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 2:37pm
post #1 of 16

on a real three tier cake? I have made a three tier dummy before but never a real tiered cake.

Please be patient with me......I am almost certain that the answer is already here somewhere, but CC has been EXTREMELY slow for me in the last couple of months. That's why you never see me on here anymore icon_sad.gif

Thanks in advance.

15 replies
LuvLyrics Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 2:56pm
post #2 of 16

I am sorry but what do you mean??? between tiers? Here is my answer to what I thin you are asking...

I was told to use wax paper to keep the buttercream from sticking to the bottom of my to tier cake, and under each tier I use a cardboard covered with foil to keep the cake moist and making it stable once it's place on top of the cake...I hope this help icon_smile.gif ..and the wax paper does work great !...I do put a bit of buttercream on top of the wax paper to make he boar stick..

BlakesCakes Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 7:49pm
post #3 of 16

Each cake tier needs to be on it's own board.

I use 3/16th inch foamcore cut to the size of the cake. I wipe the foamcord off with drinking alcohol or vanilla extract to sanitize.

I don't cover the board with anything because I don't want foil or saran bits to come up with the cake while cutting it.

I have no problems with dry cakes, weakened boards, etc.

With a non crusting buttercream, it's difficult not to have icing stick to the board of the tier above. I've used PS and chocolate shavings to try to prevent this, but it still happens to some degree. Even if I put down parchment or wax paper (and I don't like to do this because I think it can contribute to the tier shifting during transport), I still get some icing loss. If possible, I give a disposable piping bag full if icing to the client and tell them to add it to any pieces that look too naked.


indydebi Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 8:45pm
post #4 of 16
Originally Posted by LuvLyrics

I am sorry but what do you mean??? between tiers?

I'm also not sure what you mean.

Is it a stacked cake? Are you asking what do you put between the tiers of cake as you stack them right on top of each other?

Is it a pillared cake? Are you asking what you put in the space between the tiers for decoration?

Jen80 Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 9:59pm
post #5 of 16

Sorry for the confusion icon_redface.gif

Yes, it is a stacked cake. I want to know what to put underneath each cake tier for stacking on top of each other.

I can not get a hold of foam core in my area or from my supplier.

I am using fondant to cover the cake.

I'd rather not use foil.

Thanks again.

Tellis12 Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 10:26pm
post #6 of 16

I always glue two cardboard circles together (opposite grains together) and use that between cakes. So basically I put my uniced cakes onto my cardboards, ice it and then stack the cakes. Make sure you put some kind of support, (dowels, bubble straws, sps) in all but the top tier. Hope this makes sense. Feel free to pm me if you have any other questions.

BlakesCakes Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 10:27pm
post #7 of 16

If no foam core, then you need to use standard cake cardboards.

It never hurts to use 2 or 3 for extra support & strength--you can stick them together with buttercream icing, royal icing, or tape folded back on itself (don't tape the edges because it will come in contact with the cake & icing and tape isn't food safe).

If you can get them, waxed boards are great.


lauthala Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 10:58pm
post #8 of 16

Depends on if you are using fruit cake or not,as I only use fruit cakes I use those thin masonite cakes boards the same size as the tiers,my hubby makes them for me or you can buy them at any cake decorating shop, Spotlight have them to.I put skewers into tiers a hairs breadth above the fondant,I also but some royal icing in center between the bottom of cake board and top of tier for a bit of security.
Great fun decorating with this rain and humidity,I'm trying to do a three tier wedding cake.

Jen80 Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 11:54pm
post #9 of 16

Thanks so much guys.

I think it's time I found a new supplier, because I can't get cake cardboards from them either Grrrrrr.

One last thing if any of you are still following this thread: I want to put a dowel down the center of the whole cake for support. This is not going to be as easy as just buying some from the hardware store is it? Where can I get food safe dowel from?

The rain has disappeared from our area for now lauthala. We're on the Atherton Tablelands near Cairns, but I was pretty much in tears just before Christmas while I was trying to ice a Chrissy cake for the CWA because of the humidity. Had to throw about $30 worth of Fondx in the bin icon_cry.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 8 Mar 2010 , 12:25am
post #10 of 16

For a central dowel, if the tiers add up to more than 12", there is nothing that is certified as food safe.

The packages of Wilton dowels are 12". I don't have a package handy to read it, but I assume that because Wilton markets it for food, then they most likely have been approved--or, for some unknown reason, they don't need to be approved.

I buy long wooden dowels--36"+--at WalMart and sanitize them by wiping them down with Everclear drinking alcohol--75% alcohol. I then rub it with buttercream to "seal" the pores in the wood.

It's what works....

Jen80 Posted 8 Mar 2010 , 12:42am
post #11 of 16

Thank you so much Rae. You've been a great help icon_biggrin.gif

lauthala Posted 8 Mar 2010 , 5:47am
post #12 of 16

Live near the Sunshine coast,and in a week we have had just over 16 inches, water water every where.The silica Gel crystals arrived today so am putting them in containers inside where I have decorations and cakes stored.It's the roses which have been disasterous,even working under a table light,they sag as you are making them.Sun where are you.

dpryce1855 Posted 8 Mar 2010 , 10:27am
post #13 of 16

Jen 80, if your supplier doesn't have the basic things you need then you need to try online suppliers like www.cakedeco.com or cakesupplies4u.com. Also foamcore boards can be found at art supply stores

Jen80 Posted 9 Mar 2010 , 12:12am
post #14 of 16

Thanks dpryce

My main supplier is an online company but, as I'm in Australia some things are either really hard to get or listed under a completely different name, which makes it hard because I've learnt nearly everything I know about cakes, including terminology, from CC.

But I've just had a look at eBay and I've found a few of the things I need listed there.


Jack031 Posted 9 Mar 2010 , 3:28pm
post #15 of 16

Oh ok, I get it now...What you need to do each cake needs to have its own board and then you need to dowel the cake with either wooden or plastic dowels in the bottom tier place next tier then repeat the process until your done

Jen80 Posted 2 Apr 2010 , 7:40am
post #16 of 16

I have just finished the cake. Here it is:


Thanks again everybody for all your help icon_biggrin.gif

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