Modeling Chocolate Help Please?

Decorating By xmstazx Updated 7 Mar 2010 , 11:12pm by ibmoser

xmstazx Posted 6 Mar 2010 , 12:09am
post #1 of 9

I just tried to make my own modeling chocolate using the wiltons white chocolate wafers and 1/3 cup light corn syurp. It all melted fine, I added the syurp was mixing and it was looking great. The next thing I know I have a greasy mess in my bowl. I spread it out and used a paper towel to get the extra grease off, but it still looks way to greasy. Please help me.

8 replies
fat-sissy Posted 6 Mar 2010 , 12:23am
post #2 of 9

You need to just let it sit overnight. It will harden and the oil will be gone.

gmorriello Posted 6 Mar 2010 , 12:25am
post #3 of 9

I lay out saran wrap on the counter and pour it on as much in a glob (ball) as possible and wrap it and leave it out overnight. It will harden and then you cut away pieces and use the warmth of your hands to make it pliable again. hth

Shannie13 Posted 6 Mar 2010 , 12:32am
post #4 of 9

One of the things I learned in my chocolate class was to make sure the chocolate wasn't too hot. We used stainless steel bowls and had to keep feeling the bottom of the bowl to ensure it was cool enough. My Chef told us that the water that we melt the chocolate over shouldn't be hotter than 50 degrees C (I am Canadian and don't use Farenheit measurements). I let my chocolate almost start to set up before I add my corn syrup and I get a loose ball, which I then wrap between 2 sheets of heavy plastic and let sit overnight. Sometimes, depending on when I need it, I will make it up to a week in advance.
HTH

xmstazx Posted 6 Mar 2010 , 12:48am
post #5 of 9

Thanks ladies, It does look a little better now that it's setting out. I will TRY not to play with it until tomorrow. I have a feeling the bowl I used to melt in the microwave held my heat and that messed something up. I will know more tomorrow. I'm letting it rest two hours on the counter, after the two hours do I move to the fridge? How much corn syurp would I use with 1 pound chocolate? I've read differnent thing about that. I'm going to try milk and dark adn I know you use different amounts of the syurp. Any ideas? Thanks again!!!!

newmansmom2004 Posted 6 Mar 2010 , 12:50am
post #6 of 9

Someone told me to use paramount crystals to keep the chocolate from getting hard after making modeling chocolate. I bought some today but haven't used them yet. Does anyone have any experience using these crystals and does it really keep the chocolate from getting hard?

Thanks.

Sweet_Guys Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 2:32pm
post #7 of 9

Although you can use them for milk and dark, we use the paramount crystals to loosen up the white chocolate when we melt it down. I'm not sure how it would be used for modelling chocolate as we use it when we're pouring chocolate hot into molds.

Paul

newmansmom2004 Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 7:43pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Guys

Although you can use them for milk and dark, we use the paramount crystals to loosen up the white chocolate when we melt it down. I'm not sure how it would be used for modelling chocolate as we use it when we're pouring chocolate hot into molds.

Paul




Thanks for the 411, Paul. Sounds like I just need to do some experimenting! (translation = sampling) icon_wink.gif

Julie

ibmoser Posted 7 Mar 2010 , 11:12pm
post #9 of 9

I was fortunate enough to take a class with Mike McCarey, and he does not use paramount crystals in chocolate or candy clay. The paramount crystals are usually used to make a chocolate coating easier to bite without totally fracturing. Gently melt your chocolate/candy melts (be careful - they burn easily), bring your corn syrup to approximately the same temperature, and stir them together with a folding motion. When the mixture loses its glossy appearance, stop stirring! The more you continue to stir after that point, the more it will separate. Scrape it into a piece of plastic wrap and allow to firm overnight. Break off small pieces and knead them to a working consistency.

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