m1m Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:26pm
post #1 of

How can I make a scratch recipe more moist?

I tried the Confetti Cakes recipe for white cake, but both my husband and I found it to be very dry.

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41 replies
m1m Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 4:43pm
post #2 of

In her book, she states that this recipe is good for carving, which is why I was interested in this cake recipe.

Loucinda Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 6:33pm
post #3 of

I use the WASC cake recipe on here for any cakes that need to be carved. It is moist, yet dense - works perfectly for me.

I dont' have much luck with scratch cakes - there are many on here who do though, and I am sure they will chime in soon.

julzs71 Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 6:44pm
post #4 of

What kind of cakes do you usually eat? Boxed or scratch? They are totally different and scratch cakes tend to taste dry if you've never eaten them before.
I usually will let my cakes sit for a day and they do become less dry tasting. On white cakes I do put a simple syrup on it.

PennySue Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 7:01pm
post #5 of

I bake from scratch mostly except when doing the WASC. My hint is to let your cake rest in the pan for a few minutes till it pulls away from the sides, but is still hot. I flip them out onto a rack, lay plastic wrap in the pan and flip the cake back into it. Wrap it up real good; you'll see steam form under the wrap. I'll put foil over the top (even though it has plastic wrap on it) and then I freeze them. Even if it is only overnight, the steam stays in the cake and they are so moist it's unbelievable. I have actually never had a dry cake, even white, doing this. Since I like my cakes really, really, moist, I'll also use simple syrup at times, flavored with organic flavorings.

m1m Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 2:03am
post #6 of

Thanks for all the replies everyone!

Usually, we eat box cakes-Pillsbury- and this is my first foray into scratch cakes.

Thanks again.

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cakeandpartygirl Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 2:20am
post #7 of

i've heard to stir 2 tbsp of oil into the batter just before putting into your cake pan.

sweetsbyjen Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 2:26am
post #8 of

add a packet of 3.4 oz pudding mix, should do it....

LyndaOlsen Posted 5 Mar 2010 , 3:46am
post #9 of

I have never had good luck with Pillsbury. I find they tend to be drier and don't raise as high as Betty Crocker or Duncan Heinz. That's just my opinion and others may not have had the same issues. I have never had a complaint about my cakes being too dry. Truth is I hear all the time how moist they are. If I HAVE to use Pillsbury, I add an extra cake mix, more oil and cook it less time.

I also agree with the previous post. Put plastic wrap over the warm pans and freeze the cakes. Freezing them helps to add moisture.

rene1976 Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 12:58pm

Well, I don't like the confetti cake recipe either...very dry.
I do have a good recipe and it is really moist but had a customer complain that when it was refridgerated, it went dry and dense. Hmmm
I will try the wrapping while hot too. I always thought that if I did that, it would make it goopy. But now I know!

DebbyJG Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 1:22pm

Thanks for this, I've been wondering this as well. I don't do any box mixes because we can't have the chemicals like aluminum and hydrogenated oil, but it's a real problem because, well, at least in the U.S., our taste buds have just gotten used to the extra moistness of box cakes! But... I don't like to freeze my cakes either....I think, if it's frozen once and rethawed, then if it's frozen again, like as in an anniversary layer, it's going to be that cardboard-refrozen-rethawed nasty cake thing. So do you just freeze it for a little while, just to seal in moisture? Or do you have to freeze it overnight or equivalent?
Another question, about pudding or oil added -- I've really thought about doing this, because my chocolate cake recipe uses some veg oil and it is ALWAYS SO YUMMY and moist. But I've been afraid to do the same with a white or yellow cake, because I haven't been doing this long enough yet to feel confident about messing with the chemistry. icon_smile.gif How much oil do you put in, say, for a standard two 8 inch layer recipe? And do you cook it at the same time and temp as the basic recipe?

Thanks so much. I love this website!!!
Debby

PinkZiab Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 2:22pm

Also, REALLY watch your baking time... boxed cakes are specifically formulated to stay moist, and fool-proof, so even if you overbake them a little (though not TOO much, of course), they still taste decent. Scratch cakes are not so forgiving. Don't depend on the baking time of the recipe--it's just a guide. Start checking early and take the cake out when it's JUST done. The #1 cause of dryness is overbaking.

cheatize Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 2:36pm

I tried her chocolate cake recipe and it's good. Maybe it's the recipe? Have you tried her chocolate one?

DebbyJG Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 2:56pm

I have a chocolate cake recipe that I won't waver from, because it is easy and always comes out perfect. icon_smile.gif What I'm in constant search for is a white or yellow cake that is just as perfectly moist. I tried once to take my chocolate cake recipe and..well, just take out the chocolate and see what happens. It was edible, but too dense/heavy, so my quest continues.
Who do you mean when you said "her chocolate cake recipe"? Because if whoever she is has a good chocolate recipe, maybe she has a good non-chocolate recipe too! icon_smile.gif

LyndaOlsen Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 4:30pm

I think the White Almond Sour Cream cake (in CakeCentral Receipe section) has already been mentioned. I tried it over the weekend because I have to do a sculpted husky dog and it was fantastic. I'll never make another white cake.

It's easy too because it takes 2 white cake mixes. It's dense like a pound cake and the flavor is really wonderful.

If you know of a wonderful chocolate cake, it would be nice if you would share that.

cakeandpartygirl Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 6:15pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by DebbyJG

Thanks for this, I've been wondering this as well. I don't do any box mixes because we can't have the chemicals like aluminum and hydrogenated oil, but it's a real problem because, well, at least in the U.S., our taste buds have just gotten used to the extra moistness of box cakes! But... I don't like to freeze my cakes either....I think, if it's frozen once and rethawed, then if it's frozen again, like as in an anniversary layer, it's going to be that cardboard-refrozen-rethawed nasty cake thing. So do you just freeze it for a little while, just to seal in moisture? Or do you have to freeze it overnight or equivalent?
Another question, about pudding or oil added -- I've really thought about doing this, because my chocolate cake recipe uses some veg oil and it is ALWAYS SO YUMMY and moist. But I've been afraid to do the same with a white or yellow cake, because I haven't been doing this long enough yet to feel confident about messing with the chemistry. icon_smile.gif How much oil do you put in, say, for a standard two 8 inch layer recipe? And do you cook it at the same time and temp as the basic recipe?

Thanks so much. I love this website!!!
Debby





I put in 2 tbsp. I don't adjust the cooking times but like pink ziab check it

snarkybaker Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 6:33pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennySue

I bake from scratch mostly except when doing the WASC. My hint is to let your cake rest in the pan for a few minutes till it pulls away from the sides, but is still hot. I flip them out onto a rack, lay plastic wrap in the pan and flip the cake back into it. Wrap it up real good; you'll see steam form under the wrap. I'll put foil over the top (even though it has plastic wrap on it) and then I freeze them. Even if it is only overnight, the steam stays in the cake and they are so moist it's unbelievable. I have actually never had a dry cake, even white, doing this. Since I like my cakes really, really, moist, I'll also use simple syrup at times, flavored with organic flavorings.




Wow! that is the worst idea I have ever heard. It violates about 10 different safe food handling standards. By not allowing the cake to cool before wrapping it you are creating a PERFECT environment for bacterial growth. I hope you aren't letting that adorable baby eat cake made with this method.

m1m Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 6:43pm

I think it was simply the recipe.

I've tried several from scratch recipes since and found I like the Whimsical Bakehouse recipe for white cake.

Still experimenting now with strawberry, chocolate and yellow (all from scratch).

My husband and I love Pillsbury, but a few family members think box cakes are "beneath them"and that anything that is not from scratch is junk.

cammyblake1 Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 6:51pm

http://parenting.ivillage.com/gs/gscelebrations/0,,birthdayparty_d00jvd2c,00.html

Is this it? I notice you say this was your first attempt. That's probably the problem. I'm willing to bet you rushed the recipe. You really need to slow down and practice. A good scratch cake never needs anything to make it moister.

m1m Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 6:59pm

Yes, that was the recipe(Confetti Cakes).

I think it would be good for sculpting because it was firm, but we didn't like the texture or flavor much.

DebbyJG Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 7:08pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by m1m


My husband and I love Pillsbury, but a few family members think box cakes are "beneath them"and that anything that is not from scratch is junk.




Just to clarify, I would never say using box cakes is "beneath" anyone. We just personally can't have the chemicals that are in the mix cakes (like hydrogenated oil and aluminum) because my kids are very sensitive to it; we always know when they've had box cake because they are then throwing up the rest of the day. icon_sad.gif

DebbyJG Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 7:10pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeandpartygirl



I put in 2 tbsp. I don't adjust the cooking times but like pink ziab check it




Thanks!! icon_biggrin.gif

No-goodLazyBum Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 7:43pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by snarkybaker

Quote:
Originally Posted by PennySue

I bake from scratch mostly except when doing the WASC. My hint is to let your cake rest in the pan for a few minutes till it pulls away from the sides, but is still hot. I flip them out onto a rack, lay plastic wrap in the pan and flip the cake back into it. Wrap it up real good; you'll see steam form under the wrap. I'll put foil over the top (even though it has plastic wrap on it) and then I freeze them. Even if it is only overnight, the steam stays in the cake and they are so moist it's unbelievable. I have actually never had a dry cake, even white, doing this. Since I like my cakes really, really, moist, I'll also use simple syrup at times, flavored with organic flavorings.



Wow! that is the worst idea I have ever heard. It violates about 10 different safe food handling standards. By not allowing the cake to cool before wrapping it you are creating a PERFECT environment for bacterial growth. I hope you aren't letting that adorable baby eat cake made with this method.




While I see why someone would think there is food safety handling issues I think thats an over-reaction. Even after wrapping the cake after a "few minutes" its temp should still greater than 165*F when wrapped so soon after being baked in a 350*F oven. The only safety issue I can see is burning the <bleep> out of yourself handling the cake. Or melting the plastic if you don't use commecial grade.

m1m Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 7:49pm

I understand.

A friend of mine's family is on a completely gluten free/casein free diet.

I like both box and scratch cakes and respect both kinds of bakers and cakes.

I just simply have some relatives who do feel a certain way about box cakes and it's not due to diet or allergies.

icon_smile.gif

sadsmile Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 9:30pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by No-goodLazyBum

Quote:
Originally Posted by snarkybaker

Quote:
Originally Posted by PennySue

I bake from scratch mostly except when doing the WASC. My hint is to let your cake rest in the pan for a few minutes till it pulls away from the sides, but is still hot. I flip them out onto a rack, lay plastic wrap in the pan and flip the cake back into it. Wrap it up real good; you'll see steam form under the wrap. I'll put foil over the top (even though it has plastic wrap on it) and then I freeze them. Even if it is only overnight, the steam stays in the cake and they are so moist it's unbelievable. I have actually never had a dry cake, even white, doing this. Since I like my cakes really, really, moist, I'll also use simple syrup at times, flavored with organic flavorings.



Wow! that is the worst idea I have ever heard. It violates about 10 different safe food handling standards. By not allowing the cake to cool before wrapping it you are creating a PERFECT environment for bacterial growth. I hope you aren't letting that adorable baby eat cake made with this method.



While I see why someone would think there is food safety handling issues I think thats an over-reaction. Even after wrapping the cake after a "few minutes" its temp should still greater than 165*F when wrapped so soon after being baked in a 350*F oven. The only safety issue I can see is burning the <bleep> out of yourself handling the cake. Or melting the plastic if you don't use commecial grade.




Well if they teach you not to do that in food safety classes then it must be for a good reason right...? Bacteria baby it breeds in moisture at the right temperatures and freezing won't kill it. Do a little research and check it out. But then again forget I mentioned anything- at least you won't need that regular dose of fiber to keep your system moving. thumbs_up.gif

TracyLH Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 9:51pm

Thanks for the great info on making a scratch cake moister. I am a cookier, but my daughter is a budding baker and has it in her head that cakes must only be made from scratch and, well, she has been raised on moist box cakes. I will save this information for her. Thanks again! icon_smile.gif

milissasmom Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 10:09pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by m1m

How can I make a scratch recipe more moist?

I tried the Confetti Cakes recipe for white cake, but both my husband and I found it to be very dry.

icon_smile.gif




This recipe has been my go-to white cake for the past 2 years! I can't even think of it without my mouth watering! icon_smile.gif Don't over-bake it! It has to be out of the oven when it's just done or it could possibly dry out! I over baked it once on my first try as cupcakes they could only be revived with simple syrup (I couldn't bare to throw them out). But if you bake this just right (you may even need to bake it at 325 and not 350) it is amazing. I carve with it, stack it etc and never have a problem. But I DO freeze it after it's cooled and wrapped in saran and foil. I wrap it at least over night before carving or stacking. Don't give up on it just yet...play around with it til you get it right then you will know exactly how your over needs to be as far as temp and bake time. I love her Chocolate cake too!!!!!!!!!!!!!! So yummy. I have never baked a boxed cake that I prefer over a scratch cake! I have tried the WASC cake twice and can't get it right! icon_sad.gif Gonna try it at least one more time before I give up on it. I dont think scratch is better than box and I think it is horrible when people put one down to lift the other up. It's all about preference! Happy baking!

sadsmile Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 10:09pm

Just so you guys know there is a difference between moisture and being oily. Your mouth thinks oil is moisture-but it's not.

cammyblake1 Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 10:13pm

That is so true, oily does not mean moist.

shanienee Posted 16 Mar 2010 , 10:30pm

My godmother used to use about 2 tablespoons of mayonnaise in her cakes for moisture and a package of pudding.

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