Splenda Diabetic Cake - Blood Sugar Spikes?

Decorating By SpecialtyCakesbyKelli Updated 4 Mar 2010 , 1:04pm by MariaLovesCakes

SpecialtyCakesbyKelli Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 3:50am
post #1 of 21

Hey guys, if I have posted this in the wrong forum, I appologize in advance...wasn't sure where to post it.

Anyway, I'm making a cake for 79 yr old's bday, and he is diabetic. All the recipes I found call for splenda. I'm a little concerned with this, because after doing some research,it's inconclusive if splenda actually causes blood sugar spikes in diabetics. icon_eek.gif

Does anyone have any input on this? I know some of you must be much more experienced in this area than I am.
Thanks
Kelli

20 replies
costumeczar Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 4:05am
post #2 of 21

Splenda tastes nasty when it's heated in the baking process. If you look at the "splenda for baking" version, you'll see that they figured it out and the baking type is half splenda, half sugar.

Your best bet is to make him a regular cake that has a little less sugar than normal, and have him only have a small piece. The American Diabetic Association says that you can have desserts in moderation, you just have to be careful and not eat the whole cake. Merinuge buttercreams have less sugar in them than the crisco versions, or you could use a whipped cream that only has a little sweetener in it. You cna use splenda for that!

Renaejrk Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 4:27am
post #3 of 21

There is also a more expensive sweetener that is great for this - Whey Low - the website is just the name all typed together with a .com - you should check it out. But Costumeczar is right, Splenda used for baking has sugar in it which can cause spikes in blood sugar and it doesn't even taste good. You'd be better off just limiting the amount of sugar and giving him a small serving if you don't use the Whey low. Also, it is not only sugar that causes blood sugar spikes - carbs do it because they are turned into glucose in your system.

SpecialtyCakesbyKelli Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 4:49am
post #4 of 21

Thanks for the advice... I just hate to have this kind of liability on my hands. Even if I tell them that it's a low sugar recipe, and that he should only have a small slice, I have no conrol over who eats what after it leaves me. I don't feel like it would be my fault if I advise them of this, but you know how some people are.... kinda like the guy who gets hurt breaking in to a house and sues the owners LOL

costumeczar Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 11:32am
post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpecialtyCakesbyKelli

Thanks for the advice... I just hate to have this kind of liability on my hands. Even if I tell them that it's a low sugar recipe, and that he should only have a small slice, I have no conrol over who eats what after it leaves me. I don't feel like it would be my fault if I advise them of this, but you know how some people are.... kinda like the guy who gets hurt breaking in to a house and sues the owners LOL




All you can do is all you can do...You're right that once it leaves your hands you have no control over how much they shove into their pie holes (Cake holes?). My husband's uncle is diabetic and he got that way by ignoring dietary rules and eating whatever he wanted. My mother was the same way, she knew things were bad for her but she ate them anyway. As long as you tell them what's in the cake, you can't be responsible for how much of it they eat.

CWIL Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 12:18pm
post #6 of 21

Why don't you try a vegan recipe. Most of those do not call for white sugar and use other things as sweeteners - such as unsweetened applesauce. I would never say a cake is "diabetic," just that it is lower in sugar! HTH

panipuri Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 12:46pm
post #7 of 21

Kelli,
its not just sugar that causes blood spikes - but mainly carbohydrates. One can not eat sugar, but eat carbohydrates and still have a blood spike.
( I am diabetic)
Joy of baking has a good cake with splenda - I forget what it is, but its something about the mixing methods that make it a bit better than other recipes.
You cannot control what the person eats - if they have requested a sugar free cake, you need to let them know the ingredients - the rest is upto them. If he is diabetic, I am sure he know what and how much to eat - it is a lifestyle - not a one time occurence and most diabetics know.
So dont worry about your part - just let them know wha yo ave used - the rest is up to them.
Elaine

MariaLovesCakes Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 1:15pm
post #8 of 21

This is interesting because I've been searching for recipes for sugar less or sugar free cookies for my diabetic friends. I try to go to sites for Diabetics instead of just the Splenda site. However, Splenda is endorsed by the National Diabetes Foundation (I think that's what is called) so I have used it for my mom who is a diabetic. I used whole wheat flour as well whenever possible. here's a statement from Splenda's site:

Quote:
Quote:



Yes. Even though SPLENDA® Brand Sweetener starts with sugar, it goes through a patented process that changes it into a no-calorie, non-carbohydrate sweetener. The result is a sweetener that tastes like sugar, without any of sugars calories. And, like sugar, it stays sweet even when its used in cooking and baking.

The body does not recognize SPLENDA® Brand Sweetener as a sugar. In fact, clinical studies have shown that SPLENDA® Brand Sweetener (sucralose) does not affect blood glucose levels, insulin, or HbA1c.1-3 In a meal plan for people with diabetes, up to 4 packets of SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener or up to 8 teaspoons of SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated, are considered a free food. The American Dietetic Association and the American Diabetes Association consider a free food to be any food or beverage that contains less than 20 calories and 5 grams or less of carbohydrate per serving.

Like other no-calorie sweeteners on the market, the granulated and packet products contain small amounts of carbohydrate (less than 1 gram per serving) that provide needed volume and texture. These common food ingredients, which include maltodextrin and/or dextrose, add so few calories per serving that all SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener Products meet the Food and Drug Administrations criteria for no-calorie foods (<5 calories/serving).


JustToEatCake Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 3:30pm
post #9 of 21

I've made a cake with the splenda baking "mix" and it tastes "fine". The reason they went to the sugar/splenda mix is that the cake doesn't brown without sugar. It actually tasted OK. It is a bit drier and crumbly but still if it's one's only option I don't see a problem with the cake (not the carbs that's up to the eater).

MariaLovesCakes Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 3:40pm
post #10 of 21

I've made cookies with Splenda but not cakes. I would love to try one.

whisperingmadcow Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 4:01pm
post #11 of 21

Sugar is a tenderizer. It makes your cakes nice and tender because it melts out in the baking process. Although Splenda does taste like sugar, it doesn't react the same way to heat the sugar does. Thats why the half and half recipes. It will hold its 'shape' or form and you might have a gritty mouth feel.

If you are looking for a low sugar recipe, I might suggest looking into a sweetener called agave nectur. Its a nartual sweetener that acts in the same fashion as sugar when baking and I believe (although not 100% sure) that diabetics can consume it just fine. I would stay away from any half and half recipes just because your not certain exactly how much he can consume. I believe that I have seen agave at my local food store, but if you can't fine it go to whole foods or some place like it. I know for certain that they have it.

costumeczar Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 7:02pm
post #12 of 21

Agave nectar is almost all fructose, so it will give you a blood sugar spike just like regular sugar. They process the plant so much to get the nectar out and concentrate it, there aren't really any health benefits in using it. I'd still just go with the "lower-sugar and tell them what's in it" approach.

djs328 Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 7:19pm
post #13 of 21

As for your icing, I always make my diabetic FIL whipped cream icing, and use splenda in it. (The cake itself I don't adapt at all - we monitor his intake instead...ie: we cut him a small piece, and hide leftovers in places he won't look! LOL!) But the whipped cream as an icing works beautifully!
Also, for a filling, use sugar-free Jello pudding mix + whipping cream. Makes a delish filling!!!
HTH!

costumeczar Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 7:20pm
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by djs328

As for your icing, I always make my diabetic FIL whipped cream icing, and use splenda in it. (The cake itself I don't adapt at all - we monitor his intake instead...ie: we cut him a small piece, and hide leftovers in places he won't look! LOL!) But the whipped cream as an icing works beautifully!
!




Ha ha ha, those are both good ideas! (whipping cream + hiding desserts) icon_lol.gif

whisperingmadcow Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 7:21pm
post #15 of 21

Well, I am sorry if I gave bad info. I nkow the company uses agave as an alternative sweetener so maybe I am just jumping to conclusions.

What about Stevia? not sure on that one either.

I wouldn't use splenda though...

EvMarie Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 7:44pm
post #16 of 21

My grandpa is diabetic. He used to just control it with diet, but now we do a shot every morning. He seems to handle most "sugar free" items well. My mom and I have concocted some recipes so he can eat them with less concern. But, no scratch cakes.

We tried a cake mix made by sweet n low. I can no longer find it...and that's okay, because it wasn't that wonderful to begin with. I believe Pillsbury sells a "low sugar" mix. It's white I think. You may be able to use a doctored box recipe to provide a "less sugar" option.

For filling, I agree with djs328 the sugar free jello pudding. My mom makes killer cream puffs with the sugar free pudding for filling. All kinds of flavor are available. Just reduce milk for a thicker filling. Depending on the consistency you want, you can add whipped cream or not. Also, there are many options for sugar free jams/jelly/preserves. My grandpa loves his sugar free jellys. And, of course, fresh fruit is the best option. You always see the sugar free pie option as a berry pie. Strawberries, blueberries, and blackberries are most popular.

For frosting, I'm no expert. But, couldn't you whip the tar out of some crisco/butter and add limited sugar? I haven't tried it since, but by accident one time, I let my crisco and butter whip in the mixer. I walked away and literally forgot about it for like 15 minutes. It was light and fluffy like regular whipped (cooked) icing. Not sure if you could add a sugar/splenda mix just until sweet enough & then flavor? If you prefer real whipped cream, that's tasty too, but if you have a concern about dairy sitting out, maybe you could continue my "accidental experiment".

I think there is an online calculator of sorts that you can enter in your ingredients and then a nutrition label is provided. I've only heard about it. But, if your super concerned, you could plug in your ingredients for frosting, filling, and cake & just hand over the labels to your clients. Just an idea...

icon_smile.gif Good Luck!

SpecialtyCakesbyKelli Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 8:27pm
post #17 of 21

Thanks everyone for all the help. I tried a scratch cake with the splenda/sugar blend last night, it taste okay, a bit dry though. Really just thinking this is all too much trouble at this point. If it were just a recipe I couldn't get right, it would be different, but when someone's health is involved, that just worries me. I can't get the cake to taste anywhere near as good as my other cakes, and I'm not sure I want to send out something I'm not satisfied with. Gotta get through this one, then I'm quitting LOL

MariaLovesCakes Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 8:41pm
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpecialtyCakesbyKelli

Thanks everyone for all the help. I tried a scratch cake with the splenda/sugar blend last night, it taste okay, a bit dry though. Really just thinking this is all too much trouble at this point. If it were just a recipe I couldn't get right, it would be different, but when someone's health is involved, that just worries me. I can't get the cake to taste anywhere near as good as my other cakes, and I'm not sure I want to send out something I'm not satisfied with. Gotta get through this one, then I'm quitting LOL




Well that's okay. I am sure the diabetic customer's know that they won't get the same taste and texture if you use an artificial sweetener. As long as they know that, then you are okay.

I have done cookies and they come out really good. Well, I have done a recipe for Chocolate Chip and a chocolate cake that are really good.

But I have a sugar cookie recipe that didn't come out well and I think it was because it calls for the Splenda Sugar Blend and I just used the granulated Splenda. So I will try it again. I bought the blend stuff and I hope it comes out okay.

SugarFrosted Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 3:10am
post #19 of 21

Being a Type II diabetic myself, I don't eat sweets. But being a baker, I won't accept the responsibility for making something for a client with a food issue, especially if it means offering something that is less than my best. So I don't bake sugar-free/egg-free/gluten-free/whatever-free.

However, that being said, sugar is NOT the only issue. Sugar, flour, milk, fruit, cornstarch, etc, ...all the things we use to make cakes, are ALL carbohydrates. If your look at the nutritional information on the side of any cake mix box, you can get an idea what I mean. There is usually additional info for an iced cake. It is divided into total carbs, and a sub category of carbs is sugar carbs. I have seen, but have not tried, Pillsbury Reduced Sugar Chocolate and Yellow Cake Mixes, with 50% less sugar. You might want to have a look in your grocery store if that interests you.

I have a couple of diabetic clients who KNOW my cakes are full of sugar, but they still order from me because their family loves my cake. One client has a teenage diabetic daughter who has been eating my cakes and adjusting her insulin since she was a tiny girl. But she is Type I. Type IIs are a different issue. MY dietician said that if I keep my own diabetes under control, an occasional meal for a special occasion, like having a slice of cake at a wedding or birthday party, is acceptable. One meal is just one meal. And then back to the program. The issue comes when a diabetic has a "special occasion" meal every day and does not follow a program.

Just tell your client what is in the cake, and let them adjust or decide how much to have.

sweet_teeth Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 3:30am
post #20 of 21

As SugarFrosted stated, it really depends on the type of diabetes the individual has.. and it's not just sugar, it's carbs. Cake is made of flour, whether it's a boxed cake, scratch cake, or sugar free cake. Cake is full of carbs no matter what recipe.

The key for a type 1, is knowing how many carbs are in each slice so they can properly measure their intake, whether it be by moderation for future meals during the day, or a shot of insulin. A diabetic does not need to stay away from sugar (or carbs), but they need to know the amount of carbs and eat them in moderation. Moderation and calculation are key for diabetics.

Unfortunately though, I have found that even many diabetics are misinformed on how to properly manage their diabetes.

MariaLovesCakes Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 1:04pm
post #21 of 21

I spoke with my cousin who has the diabetes where you have to use an insulin pump. She was telling me that she can have the Splenda Blend sugar, she just has to eat less of it than other sweeteners that have 0 grams of sugar because Splenda has 2 grams as opposed to 0 grams from Equal.

I have a recipe that calls for whole wheat flour which I prefer using than regular flour for certain cookies so that would cut down in the # of sugar carbs in the cookies.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%