What Is The Best Way To Get Black Royal Icing?

Decorating By leslie2748 Updated 4 Mar 2010 , 1:29am by luddroth

leslie2748 Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 9:05pm
post #1 of 18

I would like to do a damaskon white fondant..what is the best way to achieve black royal icing?

Thank you icon_surprised.gif)

17 replies
luddroth Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 9:22pm
post #2 of 18

...Same question. Only I want to use it for piping lace, stringwork. I'm afraid that adding the color will ruin the consistency of the icing. Anybody?

xiswtsawluiix Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 9:44pm
post #3 of 18

If adding a lot of black coloring to the buttercream or royal icing, won't the color bleed onto the cake color?

ZoesMum Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 10:39pm
post #4 of 18

Can't comment on the bleeding, but I made black royal icing for my last cake to attach ribbon roses and just made it a little stiffer than normal so that adding the colour wouldn't make it too thin. I used the Americolour super black and it worked out just fine. My plan was if it was still a little stiff after I added the colour then I would dilute it a bit to get it to the right texture.

luddroth Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 11:06pm
post #5 of 18

Thanks, Zoesmum -- have you tried to pipe with it? Will it hold fine strings?

ZoesMum Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 11:12pm
post #6 of 18

No, sorry luddroth, I haven't tried string work yet!! Maybe make a small batch and try it out??

LuvLyrics Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 11:29pm
post #7 of 18

I have pipped with it on BC and it doesn't bleed at all, the consistency can't be to thick, and I usually make a cone out of parchement paper, like that I don't have to make a ton of icing and it's easier for me to keep control, I am pretty new at this, but if you want look at my Winnie the Pooh cake, I made the bees with RI and the trail behing the bees were traces with RI too..Hope this help. icon_smile.gif

LuvLyrics Posted 1 Mar 2010 , 11:30pm
post #8 of 18

Oh I forgot, I don't thin the icing till I am done adding color ...and americolor are the colors to use.

KathysCC Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 12:11am
post #9 of 18

Remember all colors dry darker, so a deep gray will dry black. Do some testing before you try it so that you don't add too much color.

luddroth Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 1:33am
post #10 of 18

great help -- thanks all for the tips!

BlakesCakes Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 2:07am
post #11 of 18

When I took a class and did black stringwork, Geraldine Randlesome recommended using powdered colors.
They're more concentrated and won't change the consistency of the royal much at all.
You can mix it in with the water you use in the royal.
I've done it and I like the results.

HTH
Rae

luddroth Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 1:08pm
post #12 of 18

Rae -- the only powdered colors I've used are the various petal dusts, and I don't think I've seen black. Are you referring to something else?

Mug-a-Bug Posted 2 Mar 2010 , 2:09pm
post #13 of 18

Substitute some of the PS for cocoa powder then add LOTS of black color. HTH thumbs_up.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 12:50am
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by luddroth

Rae -- the only powdered colors I've used are the various petal dusts, and I don't think I've seen black. Are you referring to something else?




No--powdered black food color. I get it at my local cake deco store. It's pure color, so a little does a lot.

Rae

CakeEvolution Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 6:40am
post #15 of 18

I always add cocoa powder and then black coloring.

luddroth Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 12:08pm
post #16 of 18

The problem is that for string work, cocoa powder changes the texture of the egg-white royal -- it will clog the 00 tips and reduce the strength of the icing for drop strings. It sounds like an easy way to color icing for use with stencils or for piping larger shapes, though...

BlakesCakes Posted 3 Mar 2010 , 11:24pm
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by luddroth

The problem is that for string work, cocoa powder changes the texture of the egg-white royal -- it will clog the 00 tips and reduce the strength of the icing for drop strings. It sounds like an easy way to color icing for use with stencils or for piping larger shapes, though...




Agreed. Cocoa powder is highly alkaline, making it a drying agent. This is deadly for good quality royal when it comes to stringwork. It makes for a dry, brittle product.

Rae

luddroth Posted 4 Mar 2010 , 1:29am
post #18 of 18

Rae -- I just looked at your photos (spectacular Lambeth cakes!) and saw the pink one from Toba Garrett's class. I took Toba's classes in New York and made the very same cake! The egg white royal is the reciped I was referring to in my earlier post. I know that Toba did a lot of black and white cakes at one point. But I don't think any of us ever asked her about coloring the egg white royal. I'll look for the powdered coloring and give it a try. I've been wanting to practice stringwork again.. Thanks for your help in this forum.

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