What Should My Title Be?

Decorating By THECAKEPLACE Updated 25 Feb 2010 , 7:56pm by THECAKEPLACE

THECAKEPLACE Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 8:12pm
post #1 of 28

I am very oung and don't know what my title on a business card should be...Even if I have a book with pictures of cakes I have done, I dont feel like people can reallly accept me because of my age...You know that old saying with age comes wisdom...The worst part is that I even do it. I would rather have someone older because in my head they have more experience. So what title can I put onA card without me sounding like the boss?I know this is probably confusing it's just hard to write what i am trying to ask.Thanks a bunch

27 replies
elliespartycake Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 8:24pm
post #2 of 28

On my business card I call myself "designer/baker" because that is what I do and who I am. It has nothing to do with age; if that is what you do then that is what you can call yourself, IMHO.

Chasey Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 8:24pm
post #3 of 28

How about Owner? Or Baker?

cheatize Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 8:25pm
post #4 of 28

The same as anyone else- your name. My cards will have the name of my business and my first and last name on them. No title is needed.

tiggy2 Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 8:33pm
post #5 of 28

Can you legally sell cakes where you are? If not I wouldn't advertise. A lot of states don't allow home based cake businesses and some that do don't allow advertising unless you are licensed. If you are legal then you can put anything you like.

catlharper Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 8:35pm
post #6 of 28

When people ask what I do I say I'm and Event Planner and Cake Artist or Cake Designer. But it doesn't say anything but my name on my business cards plus contact info

Mark-Mexicano Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 8:48pm
post #7 of 28

I am 16 and have a cake business and I know what youre talking about, people always are a little nerviest when they see how young I am..... Until they see my portfolio then their more amazed. I think that when youre younger you have to work harder to prove yourself, like to show them that you are just as good as an adult.
On my business cards I just list my name (first and last) I dont think a title is necessary

TexasSugar Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 9:02pm
post #8 of 28

When it comes to being underage, I would look into things. I guess anyone can have a business, but it is my impression (someone correct me if I am wrong) that you can not enter into a contract as a minor. If that is true, then how can you have a contract between you and the person ordering the cake?

Odyssey Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:57am
post #9 of 28

TexasSugar - I would think the contract would be with the bakery rather than the individual. The bakery insurance forms and other legal documents would definitely have to be cosigned by a person of legal age. That would make the bakery responsible as an entity which would make any legal issues fall to the owner and then the cosigner if the owner had trouble doing their part. This is all speculation based on what I've gathered from my small bit of legal experience with my mother.

As for the business card. If you feel you need a title, use one that is appropriate to your job description. My favorite so far is "Cake Artist" I may have to use that if I ever start a business.

TexasSugar Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 3:46pm
post #10 of 28

If she worked at a bakery I would assume they would have given her a title. It sounds like she is just a person selling cakes.

justducky Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:00pm
post #11 of 28

My cards have just the bakery info on them. Not my name. On my state license under "title" I wrote "chief cook and bottle washer. icon_smile.gif My inspector has a great sense of humor!

mamawrobin Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:03pm
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

If she worked at a bakery I would assume they would have given her a title. It sounds like she is just a person selling cakes.




What it sounds like to me.

CakeMommyTX Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:24pm
post #13 of 28

I'm going to put "Cake Ninja" on my new cards icon_lol.gif

l80bug79 Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:26pm
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark-Mexicano

I am 16 and have a cake business and I know what youre talking about, people always are a little nerviest when they see how young I am..... Until they see my portfolio then their more amazed. I think that when youre younger you have to work harder to prove yourself, like to show them that you are just as good as an adult.
On my business cards I just list my name (first and last) I dont think a title is necessary





your work well exceeds your age. great job!

all4cake Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:27pm
post #15 of 28

Does there have to be a physical contract to order a cake? I would think no more so than with the kid that agrees to mow the lawn for x amount of money....some of them have a written agreement/understanding...joe jr. will mow your lawn every other saturday for x dollars a month....

CakeMommyTX Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:31pm
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

Does there have to be a physical contract to order a cake? I would think no more so than with the kid that agrees to mow the lawn for x amount of money....some of them have a written agreement/understanding...joe jr. will mow your lawn every other saturday for x dollars a month....




True...you can also babysit and dog walk without a contract.
But her age may leave her open to people taking advantage of her, she may want to find a way to have an adult involved just so she can do contracts on larger orders.
I can totally see someone stiffing her because "she's just a kid"
Or she could only except payment in cash up front, way before she even cranks the oven on.

motherofgrace Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:34pm
post #17 of 28

i only sell my stuff at farmers market. So I have my name, and then my "title" is home baker. But now I think Im going to change tha twith my next cards

TexasSugar Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:55pm
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX

Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

Does there have to be a physical contract to order a cake? I would think no more so than with the kid that agrees to mow the lawn for x amount of money....some of them have a written agreement/understanding...joe jr. will mow your lawn every other saturday for x dollars a month....



True...you can also babysit and dog walk without a contract.
But her age may leave her open to people taking advantage of her, she may want to find a way to have an adult involved just so she can do contracts on larger orders.
I can totally see someone stiffing her because "she's just a kid"
Or she could only except payment in cash up front, way before she even cranks the oven on.




Of course you can mow a lawn, baby sit or walk a dog with out a contract. But we are talking about providing food for the public.

A contract isnt a must, but it is valuable if someone in the agreement does not fulfill their end. A contract does not only protect the baker, but also the consumer.

What if they pay a deposit then decide they dont want the cake? If they signed a contract then you have proof you said, If you cancel and order after such and such date you forfeit the deposit.

What if they dont pay the final payment by the set date? Then a signed contract says you told them if they didnt pay by that date they do not get a cake, nor do they get their deposit back.

What if they come back and say I didnt order this and that and then some. With a contract you have proof.

My thought would be then, if the contract is between an adult and a minor, is either party legally allowed to enter into an agreement of that kind? Will the contract stand up in court if someone decides to sue or will it be null and void because a minor cant enter a contract? And would her parents be sued in the process since they are her legal guardians?

I have no idea if the OP is a minor or not. She just said she was young. And I dont know if a minor is or is not allowed to sign a contract. Im must bringing it up for her to think about if they something that does need to be considered.

Having a business card, to me is advertising to the public. And it is when you start dealing with the general public that it seems like you have to worry about all issues involved, including protecting yourself from crazy costumers.

TexasSugar Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 4:59pm
post #19 of 28

I think "Custom Cake Designer" would be a good title for most cake decorators, as long as you do custom work.

CakeMommyTX Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 5:13pm
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX

Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

Does there have to be a physical contract to order a cake? I would think no more so than with the kid that agrees to mow the lawn for x amount of money....some of them have a written agreement/understanding...joe jr. will mow your lawn every other saturday for x dollars a month....



True...you can also babysit and dog walk without a contract.
But her age may leave her open to people taking advantage of her, she may want to find a way to have an adult involved just so she can do contracts on larger orders.
I can totally see someone stiffing her because "she's just a kid"
Or she could only except payment in cash up front, way before she even cranks the oven on.



Of course you can mow a lawn, baby sit or walk a dog with out a contract. But we are talking about providing food for the public.

A contract isnt a must, but it is valuable if someone in the agreement does not fulfill their end. A contract does not only protect the baker, but also the consumer.

What if they pay a deposit then decide they dont want the cake? If they signed a contract then you have proof you said, If you cancel and order after such and such date you forfeit the deposit.

What if they dont pay the final payment by the set date? Then a signed contract says you told them if they didnt pay by that date they do not get a cake, nor do they get their deposit back.

What if they come back and say I didnt order this and that and then some. With a contract you have proof.

My thought would be then, if the contract is between an adult and a minor, is either party legally allowed to enter into an agreement of that kind? Will the contract stand up in court if someone decides to sue or will it be null and void because a minor cant enter a contract? And would her parents be sued in the process since they are her legal guardians?

I have no idea if the OP is a minor or not. She just said she was young. And I dont know if a minor is or is not allowed to sign a contract. Im must bringing it up for her to think about if they something that does need to be considered.

Having a business card, to me is advertising to the public. And it is when you start dealing with the general public that it seems like you have to worry about all issues involved, including protecting yourself from crazy costumers.




I agree that's why I suggested she find a way to involve a adult (if she is indeed a minor) for legally binding contracts and such.
I was just saying that you don't *need* a contract to make the cake (unless you have some space age oven that runs on signed contracts rather then gas or electricity), but they might help protect her (as well as the customer) from being screwed over.

all4cake Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 5:25pm
post #21 of 28

cakes are ordered everyday without a contract...

there are plenty of adults with and without contracts getting stiffed and the other way around too...and there ain't NO WAY AROUND dealing with crazy customers...no one is immune to them...

I was talking about providing a service...of any kind...to the public.

My comments aren't being made as an attack...but an observational opinion

Even with large orders, contracts are not required but more desired to conduct business...


OP...

your name/your #1 source for custom cakes!

THECAKEPLACE Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 6:12pm
post #22 of 28

Thanks everyone for all your advice I am an adult (legally anyway I still what i should tell people when they ask my positionl think of myself as a one of the kids) I am 19 years old, and when I asked about the business cards I was also referring to what i should tell people when they ask my position is or if I am the owner. I dont want to tell them I am the owner or the main person in charge. It might seem weird that i dont want them to know but like i said on my first post i wouldnt feel comfortable hiring someone my age to do something that is important to me....So should i just say baker/decorater or how should i word it?

CakeMommyTX Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 6:16pm
post #23 of 28

Lead Designer
Cake Maker Extradonaire
Cake Artist
Head Decorator

dailey Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 6:33pm
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX

Lead Designer
Cake Maker Extradonaire
Cake Artist
Head Decorator




i like "head decorator" and "lead designer".

i would stay away from "cake artist" though. that seems to be the most abused word in this business, lol! when i think of "cake artist"...Mike Mccary, Sylvia weinstock, and ron-ben israel come to mind. i personally used "cake designer".

THECAKEPLACE Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 6:36pm
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX

Lead Designer
Cake Maker Extradonaire
Cake Artist
Head Decorator



I really like head decorator thanks a bunch!!!

JustToEatCake Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 7:09pm
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by THECAKEPLACE

Thanks everyone for all your advice I am an adult (legally anyway I still what i should tell people when they ask my positionl think of myself as a one of the kids) I am 19 years old, and when I asked about the business cards I was also referring to what i should tell people when they ask my position is or if I am the owner. I dont want to tell them I am the owner or the main person in charge. It might seem weird that i dont want them to know but like i said on my first post i wouldnt feel comfortable hiring someone my age to do something that is important to me....So should i just say baker/decorater or how should i word it?




I think you shouldn't try to hide the fact that you are owner because you are young. If you have experience and you can produce and are responsible people won't care. Having said that you will probably have to work a bit harder to convince them. I would offer references (esp if you have done any weddings) and if you have experience doing cakes for a few years I'd list that on my "business card", which I don't happen to see as an advertisment but a easier way than using a pen and paper to write someone's name and number and usually given AFTER someone has asked or shown interest. I've never seen someone standing outside and just willy nilly handing out business cards to people passing buy. (Sorry for the run on sentence, whew!)

I agree with all4cake but since you are of legal age then "the not being able to enter into a contract is a moot point".

Best of luck!

liha21 Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 7:40pm
post #27 of 28

I like 'cake ninja' that was a good one!

THECAKEPLACE Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 7:56pm
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by liha21

I like 'cake ninja' that was a good one!




Yeah that was really cute my dad loved that title.....Thanks again everyone for your imput.....Waht would I do without you all?

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