Do You Use Eggs With Blood Spots?

Business By kathik Updated 27 Feb 2010 , 5:55pm by BlackCoffee

kathik Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 3:18pm
post #1 of 87

Okay, my DH and I were having a discussion about rules for kosher bakeries. (It came up after a recent thread about how to start a kosher bakery if you aren't Jewish) Anyway, following kosher rules we discard any eggs with blood spots. This is one of the things that they will check if a non-Jew is doing. I said I thought the Rabbis worried about this too much because I can't imagine anyone using eggs containing spots. But, now I've been wondering if that is true or is it just a kosher thing. Just so you know I'm not going to bash anyone for it. Jewish law only requires that kosher keeping Jews or people cooking for kosher keeping Jews keep this rule.

So, do you use eggs that have bloodspots in your baking and cooking?

Just curious,
Kathi

86 replies
muddpuppy Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 3:58pm
post #2 of 87

That's an interesting question.. I can't wait to see a few answers... I am not a Kosher baker, but I myself don't use them.. I don't have any particular reason other that I personally think the eggs look icky.. lol...

TexasSugar Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:05pm
post #3 of 87

I usually toss them if I have extra eggs. I have a SIL that is an Ag teacher, and I know I have asked her before if it is safe to use them. I'm pretty sure she said they were safe, but I'll have to ask her again what causes it and if it hurts to use them.

KSMill Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:06pm
post #4 of 87

NEVER! My grandfather had a hatchery when I was little and my mom taught me never to use eggs with blood spots.

tinygoose Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:08pm
post #5 of 87

I hate to throw them out, but last night I had an egg with a blood spot and the white was bloody. I discarded it. I've used eggs that have a tiny bloodspot spec, but I toss the ones that look bloody or when the white is bloody. I'm sure it's usable, but Yuck.

endymion Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:14pm
post #6 of 87

It means the egg has been fertilized. If it is only a speck it is fine to use the egg (except in Kosher baking). If it is larger or goes into the yolk, throw it out.

endymion Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:17pm
post #7 of 87

Ooops -- I'm wrong about the fertilization part. Just Googled and found this:

Can you eat eggs with blood spots?

Eggs with a visible blood spot on the yolk are safe for consumption. The spot can be removed with the tip of a knife. Blood or "meat" spots are occasionally found on an egg yolk. These tiny spots are not harmful and are caused by the rupture of a blood vessel during formation of the egg. Blood spots do not indicate a fertilized egg. Mass candling methods reveal most blood spots and those eggs are removed, but even with electronic spotters, it is impossible to catch all of them. If desired, the spot can be removed with the tip of a clean knife prior to cooking. These eggs are safe to eat.

From the Egg Board

tenleysmommy Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:27pm
post #8 of 87

I have never even heard about this,guess you learn something new everyday,icon_smile.gif I have a wierd egg phobia I have to pick out all the stringy white things before I can eat them.I couldnt imagine seeing a blood spot!

kathik Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:29pm
post #9 of 87

Thanks endymion. It's interesting to know they are safe to eat. Even before I kept kosher I threw them out because they looked gross to me. If anyone is interested the kosher rule isn't about safety, it is that we are forbidden to eat blood. That is why kosher meat is different, it is processed in a way that gets rid of as much blood as is possible.

Kathi

bobwonderbuns Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:34pm
post #10 of 87

Never!!! That's a sign that something is wrong with the egg and it will affect the final product (not for the better either.)

DebBTX Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:40pm
post #11 of 87

I never use eggs that have blood spots.

-Debbie B.

ShiaCakes Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:53pm
post #12 of 87

Huh. Lots of conflicting advice, even in the face of the recommendations from the egg board. I eat the eggs when they are like that, but would not use it in a recipe for a client.

AverageMom Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:55pm
post #13 of 87

Tenleysmommy: I have the exact same thing...I hate those white stringys! In fact, I can't eat eggs at all if I think about it too much. They just gross me out.

Spuddysmom Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:55pm
post #14 of 87

Never.

bobwonderbuns Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 4:57pm
post #15 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShiaCakes

Huh. Lots of conflicting advice, even in the face of the recommendations from the egg board.




Look at it this way -- would YOU eat a bloody egg? How would you feel about someone making your food who made it with a bloody egg? It's always better to be safe than sorry -- eggs aren't the most expensive ingredient in a cake so it's no great financial loss to sacrifice one bad egg for a superior product. Don't you agree?

mamawrobin Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:01pm
post #16 of 87

NO. I throw them out. Probably nothing wrong with it but I just can't use an egg once I've seen that.

KathysCC Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:05pm
post #17 of 87

I can see most of you didn't grow up on a farm. Unless it is spread throughout the white, you pick the blood spot out with a spoon and eat the egg. A blood spot does not mean the egg is bad. Of course, this might not be kosher, which was the original question, but I'm just saying that blood spots in eggs are natural and very common.

What do you think people did before Walmart? The eggs you buy in the store have been candled and the ones with blood spots are eliminated. I would guess they are used in some other way though (you might be eating them in your store bought cookies and cupcakes). Farm fresh eggs have lots of blood spots. We ate them all the time, no big deal.

kkitchen Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:06pm
post #18 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenleysmommy

I have never even heard about this,guess you learn something new everyday,icon_smile.gif I have a wierd egg phobia I have to pick out all the stringy white things before I can eat them.I couldnt imagine seeing a blood spot!




I am totally with you on that. When I bake I take out each and every stringy white trace attached to the yolk.
Takes some time but I can't adjust to 'crack and toss'

About the blood spot! YUCK! I used to use fresh home hatched eggs for baking - once I saw a blood clot in an egg ---- not a spot, a clot!
I never ordered from them again.

Not saying that the eggs were all like that .... it just scared me.
I have never gotten any of that from store bough eggs.
Typing about it makes my stomach move.....
And that is the reason why I do not order anything eggs when we go out to eat.
Don't know what is in that shell.

KHalstead Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:13pm
post #19 of 87

I too am not a Kosher baker, but I NEVER use an egg w/ a blood spot.....so gross and creepy to me. I just hate when I'm reminded that what I'm about to eat was actually a living breathing creature at one time ( or in the eggs case, ALMoST a living breathing creature) so nasty!

ShiaCakes Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:13pm
post #20 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShiaCakes

Huh. Lots of conflicting advice, even in the face of the recommendations from the egg board.



Look at it this way -- would YOU eat a bloody egg? How would you feel about someone making your food who made it with a bloody egg? It's always better to be safe than sorry -- eggs aren't the most expensive ingredient in a cake so it's no great financial loss to sacrifice one bad egg for a superior product. Don't you agree?




Um, I did. A few minutes ago.

ShiaCakes Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:15pm
post #21 of 87

And I was referring to the "speck" mentioned by the egg council. Not a blood soaked egg, yeah that would be gross.

badkitty Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:16pm
post #22 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathysCC

I can see most of you didn't grow up on a farm. Unless it is spread throughout the white, you pick the blood spot out with a spoon and eat the egg. A blood spot does not mean the egg is bad. Of course, this might not be kosher, which was the original question, but I'm just saying that blood spots in eggs are natural and very common.

What do you think people did before Walmart? The eggs you buy in the store have been candled and the ones with blood spots are eliminated. I would guess they are used in some other way though(you might be eating them in your store bought cookies and cupcakes). Farm fresh eggs have lots of blood spots. We ate them all the time, no big deal.




icon_biggrin.gif It's amazing we survived without modern food processing methods icon_lol.gif I grew up around my grandmothers dairy/egg farm and we always had milk cows and chickens at home. Have picked quite a few blood spots out of eggs, and never thought much about it. But I have to admit to being grossed out by the white stringy stuff...just because, well, it's white stringy stuff!!!

cakesdivine Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:16pm
post #23 of 87

I toss them.

PumpkinTart Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:29pm
post #24 of 87

The "white stringy stuff" is called the chalazae. For those of you already considering it "creepy" this won't help! It's basically the umbilical cord for the egg.

badkitty Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:35pm
post #25 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mseif

The "white stringy stuff" is called the chalazae. For those of you already considering it "creepy" this won't help! It's basically the umbilical cord for the egg.




oh, I knew that, and I'm fine with it, it's just that it's thick and white and stringy...makes no sense, but it's just gross! icon_wink.gif

KathysCC Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:41pm
post #26 of 87

I'm with you on the white stringy stuff. I have to pretend it isn't there. And I also try not to think about an egg being a potential baby chick. If we think too much about the things we eat, we'd probably starve!! icon_lol.gif

kathik Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:45pm
post #27 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mseif

The "white stringy stuff" is called the chalazae. For those of you already considering it "creepy" this won't help! It's basically the umbilical cord for the egg.




Okay, I am now officially grossed out!! Covering my mouth so I don't puke! tapedshut.gif

Kathi

Torts Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:46pm
post #28 of 87

I thought this topic particularly interesting because I recently started using free range, vegetarian diet, organic eggs... I realized that while with regular eggs I'd find a blood spot in about 1 out of 100 eggs... with the organic or even just chickens raised on a vegetarian diet, the bloods spots are in about 50% of the eggs... I'm not about to throw out 50% of my eggs. Initially the blood freaked me out, but I've just started picking it out because I'd much rather have the blood spotted hormone free eggs than eggs produced with chemical chickens icon_wink.gif Natural v. Unnatural... Blood or artificial hormones... Hmm. I'll take healthy and pick out the blood.

chrissypie Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 5:47pm
post #29 of 87

LOL! Was making cupcakes yesterday and thinking THE SAME THING about the white stringy thing! I didn't technically know what it was, but at the same time KNEW what it was. I simply cannot think about it. I went through a long phase of not eating eggs because of all this. I too cannot think about what my food was before it was on my plate. I didn't eat meat for ages once when I thought there was a vein in my steak! LOL! Blood spot would creep me out and def. get tossed. I felt bad but tossed an egg the other day with a double yolk! All I could do was think of the twin chicks they would have been! LOL! Oh man, I need help! Haha!

badkitty Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 6:20pm
post #30 of 87

I have sort of the opposite problem, I grew up with most of my food NOT coming from a grocery store. I'm used to bits of blood, veins, bone etc in my food and learned to just deal with it. But it took me a while to trust the commercial food preparation processes. Now, working around potato, cheese and sugar processing plants has helped me understand how it all works and how MOST of the time things are very safe. We don't live in a world of absolutes, so nothing will ever be PERFECTLY safe. But we can dream....LOL!

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