Frosting: Illuminated With Blacklight, Help

Decorating By soccermom17 Updated 19 Apr 2010 , 6:43pm by neelycharmed

soccermom17 Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 12:26am
post #1 of 14

I'm needing help trying to find out how to make a frosting that glows in the dark or is illuminated with a black-light. Similar to what the Cake Girls did with their super hero cake when they were in the $50,000 challenge last year. Any help would be appreciated. TIA Michelle.

13 replies
leah_s Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 12:37am
post #2 of 14

They mixed up a piping gel with quinine water.

Lisa540 Posted 24 Feb 2010 , 2:18am
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by soccermom17

I'm needing help trying to find out how to make a frosting that glows in the dark or is illuminated with a black-light. Similar to what the Cake Girls did with their super hero cake when they were in the $50,000 challenge last year. Any help would be appreciated. TIA Michelle.




I did this for the Ghostbusters cake in my profile. The slime was glow in the dark. Quinine Tonic Water and clear piping gel. I heated that then added the coloring and then mixed in some gelatin to thicken it a bit. Play around with it. It's not too hard. icon_biggrin.gif

7yyrt Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 12:46am
post #4 of 14

Anything protein will glow under blacklight.
Peanut butter is great.

bobwonderbuns Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 1:05am
post #5 of 14

What's quinine water?

7yyrt Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 1:22am
post #6 of 14

Image

bobwonderbuns Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 1:39am
post #7 of 14

Ah!! I thought that stuff was just plain old tonic water! Learn something new every day! icon_lol.gif

soccermom17 Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 2:52pm
post #8 of 14

Wow, check that out! Who knew? Obviously not me! Thanks to everyone. I really appreciate it. Can't wait to play around with this stuff. How cool!

Polarcakes Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 3:48pm
post #9 of 14

I am thinking of using this for a future cake ( glow in the dark skulls), but was wondering would the glow in the dark effect work in a dark space without a black light?

As well, if you color the piping gel a color, would the glow in the dark properties still show?

This looks extremely cool.

7yyrt Posted 25 Feb 2010 , 5:17pm
post #10 of 14

Yes, it still works in a color.
You can use the tonic water to make Jello. Just substitute it for the water (it may get a little bitter, so you can substitute only half the water if you are going to eat it.)
No matter the color of Jello, it will still glow blue.

Bannette Posted 19 Apr 2010 , 5:55am
post #11 of 14

This is too cool. I can't wait to try it.

prterrell Posted 19 Apr 2010 , 7:18am
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

Ah!! I thought that stuff was just plain old tonic water! Learn something new every day! icon_lol.gif




It is. Well, true tonic water is, there may be some artificially flavored tonic waters out there. Tonic water was invented as a medicinal tonic against malaria as quinine, a poison, take in carefully controlled amounts prevents the contracting of that disease. Originally, tonic water contained much grater amounts of quinine than it does today. The drink, gin and tonic, was invented as gin was added to the tonic to make it more palatable. Today's tonic water contains trace amounts of quinine, however, that small amount is enough for it to flouresce under blacklight.

Careycay72 Posted 19 Apr 2010 , 6:30pm
post #13 of 14

Does anyone know if the tonic water will still produce a blacklight glow if it is mixed into regular colored frosting, or does it have to be a gel based one?

neelycharmed Posted 19 Apr 2010 , 6:43pm
post #14 of 14

good to know... now I need cake order that needs to glow in the dark. icon_smile.gif

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