Anne Heap - Smooth Buttercream Top?

Decorating By allthehobbies Updated 23 Feb 2010 , 10:44pm by mrsmudrash

allthehobbies Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 5:01pm
post #1 of 27

I was watching the rerun of the Blind Date Cakes Challenge on FN. They showed Anne Heap icing her cake, and it looked like she had a board on top of the cake to get a flat top. She was using a scraper that came higher than the top of the tier, and going right around what looked like a masonite cake board. Anyone familiar with this technique? I'm curious how the cake board does when it's removed, as far as sticking? Any tips would be greatly appreciated. Getting a 90 degree corner at the top edge of my cakes is something I struggle with, more than anything else.

26 replies
tiggy2 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 6:10pm
post #2 of 27

sugarshack's DVD shows you haow to do it step by step www.sugaredproductions.com

revskg Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 6:15pm
post #3 of 27

Sugarshack's DVD is great, but she DOESN'T use the technique the OP is asking about. I've never seen anyone icing with a board on top. I'd be curious to know what she was doing also.

icer101 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 7:01pm
post #4 of 27

i have sugarshacks dvd. i too, has interested in what katiemh7 is asking about.

tiggy2 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 7:23pm
post #5 of 27

I was referring to the sharp top edge, not the board on top.

scionmom Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 7:50pm
post #6 of 27

I love sugarschacks dvd! It has helped but i watched that last night also and thought... ooooo, what is that? LOL!

Justbeck101 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 8:05pm
post #8 of 27

I noticed this also, I was thinking she used one on the bottom and one on the top. When the top is either refrigerated after icing or it wasn't iced yet. Then I was thinking she uses the same size board on the top as the bottom and they are like a guide for her to put the icing on the sides. Makes sense, it would all be even around the sides and with a meringue icing it would be super easy to smooth this way, you would probably get it all on and smooth in one fell swoop.

I am not sure about any of this, it is just my speculations!

Lelka Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 11:38pm
post #9 of 27

I use this method with all my BC cakes. Works like magic! Sharon's method gives an amazing results with crusting BC, her DVD is nothing short of spectacular!

sugarshack Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 11:55pm
post #10 of 27

I saw that too. My GUESS is that she uses that as a guide o ice the sides, not necessarily to help on top. But then again, I am not 100% sure. Cool idea either way

Justbeck101 Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 12:13am
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarshack

I saw that too. My GUESS is that she uses that as a guide o ice the sides, not necessarily to help on top. But then again, I am not 100% sure. Cool idea either way




How did you say that in such a clearer way? I was trying to say that, but it came out in that big long explanation!!!

lol

LuvLyrics Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 1:53am
post #12 of 27

You all might probably have this, but here is her site, she has some great cakes and video tutorials

http://blog.pinkcakebox.com/category/videos/tutorials

bobwonderbuns Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 3:58pm
post #13 of 27

That's a very interesting technique -- I'll have to try it sometime! icon_biggrin.gif

_luvscakes_ Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 5:21pm
post #14 of 27

I saw this episode! I was impressed by how smooth and perfect her buttercream was. I still can't do mine that well. Thank yu for posting the link to her site!

bobwonderbuns Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 5:24pm
post #15 of 27

So let me guess, she's using a crusting buttercream, right? I don't see how it could work with any other kind of buttercream.

_luvscakes_ Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 5:34pm
post #16 of 27

That's the only kind I use. I don't understand how people can get the other kinds smooth.

luddroth Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 5:38pm
post #17 of 27

Maybe it would work on SMBC if it were chilled first and the scraper was warmed? It could help with the sharp edges on top, but wouldn't help with the top surface at all.

fondantflubber Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 5:40pm
post #18 of 27

what is smbc? i just made something called indycrisco the other day. it was so disgusting. tell me frosting tastes better than that.

fondantflubber Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 5:40pm
post #19 of 27

what is smbc? i just made something called indycrisco the other day. it was so disgusting. tell me frosting tastes better than that.

fondantflubber Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 5:41pm
post #20 of 27

what is smbc? i just made something called indycrisco the other day. it was so disgusting. tell me frosting tastes better than that.

_luvscakes_ Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 6:21pm
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by luddroth

Maybe it would work on SMBC if it were chilled first and the scraper was warmed? It could help with the sharp edges on top, but wouldn't help with the top surface at all.




I've heard of people using hot cake knives for that kind of icing. But doesn't it have eggs in it? Crisco frosting it the best for me-it's the only kind I use. And it doesn't spoil.

luddroth Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 6:28pm
post #22 of 27

SMBC = swiss meringue butter cream. Yes, it is made by whipping hot eggwhites with sugar until they form a stiff meringue, then adding butter and flavorings. It must be refrigerated if it's not going to be served immediately. It is delicious.

_luvscakes_ Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 6:31pm
post #23 of 27

I know this may be a dumb question, but how would you serve it at an outside wedding? Like if it had to be delivered and then sit out for an hour or two? Would it go bad?

CakeandDazzle Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 7:04pm
post #24 of 27

SMBC is actually fine to sit out for 24 hours, Ive even heard up to 3 days.
The problem with chilling a smbc cake then smoothing it is that if it is colored, it will streak.... the best way to smooth it is crumb coat, fridge, frost and smooth with a hot bench scraper or spatuala. works great but is pretty time consuming and sometimes frustrating... i think i may try the upside down technique with a couple modifications....

does anyone know if sugar shacks video is only for shortening or crusting bcs????

luddroth Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 8:08pm
post #25 of 27

Right -- think of treating it the same way you would treat butter. In a cool place, it's fine for as long as butter would be. In direct sun, it will melt. You wouldn't use it for an outdoor event in hot, humid weather unless you could keep it chilled until shortly before presentation. In those conditions, Crisco-based icings are much safer.

MikeRowesHunny Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 9:25pm
post #26 of 27

I use SMBC (granted mostly inside cakes as a filling, but have done decorated ones too), all the time and I have never refrigerated any of them, and some have been a good few days at room temp, no problems whatsoever. I would never serve a buttercream cake on a hot day though - mainly because Crisco-based icings will never cross my threshold - blergh! I have never been asked to do a buttercream cream wedding cake at any time of year, and would just plain refuse anyway for summer weddings!

mrsmudrash Posted 23 Feb 2010 , 10:44pm
post #27 of 27

When I saw the first run of that episode, I emailed her because I was really curious about it! She said she uses a masonite board on top of her cakes when icing so that she gets straight sides. It helps her keep things aligned. I know I always struggle with having tapered corners at the top so this would help to keep the sides 90 degrees! I have sinced used the upside down icing technique and LOVE LOVE LOVE it! Always get super straight top edge and it's SO super fast to do!

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