What The Heck Is Going On With This??

Decorating By Aplatel87 Updated 23 Feb 2010 , 1:56pm by CanadianCakeDiva

Aplatel87 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 2:57am
post #1 of 36

I have just recently gotten into decorating, and I am experiencing a problem with EVERY cake I bake. It never comes out of the pan in 1 piece. I've greased, greased + floured, baking spray, everything I can think of! I am wondering if it is because I use box mixes which are usually extremely moist. Is that my problem? Is there anything else I can do? I want to make the beautiful cakes that I know I can make! icon_cry.gif

35 replies
mim1106 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 2:58am
post #2 of 36

You can put parchment paper in the bottom of the pan, grease it though, too. I haven't had a problem since.

Kiddiekakes Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:02am
post #3 of 36

I don't think it is the box mixes...Are you possibly flipping the cakes out of the pan too soon when they are still hot and not completely cooled? This will cause breakage etc when the cake is too warm.

Texas_Rose Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:02am
post #4 of 36

Have you tried the Baker's Joy spray with the flour added to it? It makes a big difference. Also, only let the cake cool in the pan for ten minutes (set a timer) and then turn it out onto a cooling grid. If you take it out too soon, it won't have had time to shrink back from the sides, but if you let it sit in the pan too long then it will get stuck. The recipe I use is a lot more moist than a plain box mix and it always comes out in one piece, once I figured out about the spray and the ten minutes.

madgeowens Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:06am
post #5 of 36

Yes I think taking them out to soon is the problem...happened to me today hehe....

patticakesnc Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:08am
post #6 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiddiekakes

I don't think it is the box mixes...Are you possibly flipping the cakes out of the pan too soon when they are still hot and not completely cooled? This will cause breakage etc when the cake is too warm.




That is what I was thinking too. That and is the cake cooking long enough.

Is the cake breaking when it comes out or sticking to the pan?

kakeladi Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:09am
post #7 of 36

O.k. let them cool on a rack for about 10 minutes before you turn them out of the pan. Some let them cool more ubt then they tend to stick - it's a delicate balance of letting them cool long enoug for handling and not too long to make that grease come to room temp thereby allowing the cake to stick in the pan.

Aplatel87 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:12am
post #8 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by patticakesnc

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiddiekakes

I don't think it is the box mixes...Are you possibly flipping the cakes out of the pan too soon when they are still hot and not completely cooled? This will cause breakage etc when the cake is too warm.



That is what I was thinking too. That and is the cake cooking long enough.

Is the cake breaking when it comes out or sticking to the pan?




I am letting the pans cool on a cake rack for 10-20 minutes. I separate the edges with a knife, and flip the pan over onto the rack. I usually let it sit upside down and tap the edges with the knife, and it never fails, half of it still winds up in the pan! It's VERY discouraging!

I always bake it between 325-350, but I'm wondering if the temp may be too high?

Aplatel87 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:13am
post #9 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

O.k. let them cool on a rack for about 10 minutes before you turn them out of the pan. Some let them cool more ubt then they tend to stick - it's a delicate balance of letting them cool long enoug for handling and not too long to make that grease come to room temp thereby allowing the cake to stick in the pan.




And that's exactly what I do! SO you can see my confusion! icon_sad.gificon_sad.gificon_sad.gif

patticakesnc Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:17am
post #10 of 36

Definitely try parchment paper on bottom then. I use crisco baking spray and use a good bit of it on my pans and they don't stick.

You may want to flip it out sooner than 20 min though. This is giving it time to cool inside and condensation build up on the bottom against the pan. This makes it very moist and "sticky". I normally wait 5 minutes and I put a plate or cardboard round on the top of the cake when i flip it so that it doesn't break from the flip.

Aplatel87 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:19am
post #11 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by patticakesnc

Definitely try parchment paper on bottom then. I use crisco baking spray and use a good bit of it on my pans and they don't stick.

You may want to flip it out sooner than 20 min though. This is giving it time to cool inside and condensation build up on the bottom against the pan. This makes it very moist and "sticky". I normally wait 5 minutes and I put a plate or cardboard round on the top of the cake when i flip it so that it doesn't break from the flip.




Okay I will definatly give it a try! SO do you use parchment paper AND spray? If so, does the paper go on before you spray it? Thanks SO much!!

The_Lil_Cakehouse Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:23am
post #12 of 36

Sounds like your cake isn't cooking all the way to me. Make sure it passes the knife/toothpick test, and when you push on the top it springs back immediately, if it holds the finger print it still needs to cook some. Also, if you're using bakers joy, you don't even have to use a knife around the edges. Just spray the whole pan on the inside, sides too, and then the ten minutes and flip that others talked about. HTH

patticakesnc Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:24am
post #13 of 36

I have never had to use the parchment paper. I only spray. I do the bottom and the sides very well. But if you do use it I don't think you will have to spray at all, but if you do I would put the paper down first.

ChristaPaloma Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:28am
post #14 of 36

I have found the best method is to use cake release... you can make it yourself... just blend equal parts of oil, shortening and flour in a processor to make a paste that you coat your pan with. It blends in with the cake, no taste, and the cake comes out in one poece. I usually mix 1 cup of each and it store it in a plastic container.
hth
-cp

The_Lil_Cakehouse Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:31am
post #15 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by patticakesnc

I have never had to use the parchment paper. I only spray. I do the bottom and the sides very well. But if you do use it I don't think you will have to spray at all, but if you do I would put the paper down first.




I used to do the parchment before I found how wonderful bakers spray is. But YES if you use the paper you still have to spray.

FromScratch Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:31am
post #16 of 36

I use parchment and no spray or grease or anything... they turn out everytime with no issue.

nanatrucker Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:33am
post #17 of 36

I use Wilton's cake release and it comes out easily everytime.

splash2splat Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:43am
post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristaPaloma

I have found the best method is to use cake release... you can make it yourself... just blend equal parts of oil, shortening and flour in a processor to make a paste that you coat your pan with. It blends in with the cake, no taste, and the cake comes out in one poece.




This is what I have done for the past 4 years and never had a problem once. icon_lol.gif

pearlydi Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:53am
post #19 of 36

I used to have the same problem too, until I found also the cake release from Wilton, it works great!

KateLS Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:58am
post #20 of 36

I use to just use spray with my cheap pans and it worked great. However, since I purchased my magic line pans, it never works. So I tried the cake release, and it still doesn't work every time. It depends on the cake flavor. But since I started using the parchment paper......I will NEVER go back! It is heaven sent with no worries of the bottom coming out! Just make sure to run a knife around the sides. And yes, don't wait more than 10 minutes to take it out. It gets way too wet inside.

gmorriello Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 4:00am
post #21 of 36

Cake release from Wiltons...not one problem!

kaseyrconnect Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 4:23am
post #22 of 36

I make my own cake release using the same formula as ChristaPaloma and I never have a problem with my cake coming out of the pan. I do, however have a problem with my cakes being sticky on top. I always check with a toothpick or cake tester to see if they are done, and they come out clean. Is there something I am doing wrong, or is this a normal thing?I realize I kind of stole the thread away from the original question, sorry about that, but it just popped into my head to ask this now.

noahsmummy Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 4:40am
post #23 of 36

well... i may possibly o overboard, but i spary the pan, then greased paper, then some more spray...lol. i find that if i dotn spray tthe pan before i put in the paper, then when i pour the batter in its gets all crinkley and annoying. this way is much better. i spray, smooth the paper into all the corners and edges, then spray again, then done. it works everytime. =) The other day i didnt have any paper and just psrayed then.. epic fail..lol. didnt have time or ingredients to make abother.. sooo i just had to piece it back togather and ice that sucker up the best i could! haha

JanH Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 5:01am
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aplatel87

I am letting the pans cool on a cake rack for 10-20 minutes.




If your cake has cooled in the pan the shortening/flour sets up and acts like glue and is preventing your cake layer bottom from releasing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aplatel87

I usually let it sit upside down and tap the edges with the knife, and it never fails, half of it still winds up in the pan!




What you're doing is letting gravity break apart your cake layer to release it...

You should let your cakes cool for only a short amount of time - about 10 mins. (indydebi has hers out of the pans within 2-3 minutes of coming out of the oven).

To remove cake layer safely from pan, you should cover the top of the cake pan with one cooling rack and turn the cake pan/cooling rack in one smooth motion - removing the pan immediately.

Then you must immediately place a second cooling rack over the cake layer and invert both cooling racks. (Try not to squeeze the two cooling racks as you're inverting the cake layer/s as hot cake is quite fragile.)

Now remove the top cooling rack, and allow the cake to cool right side up (with hump on top). Allowing the cake layer to rest on its hump for any length of time will cause the cake layer to crack while it's cooling.

HTH[/i]

Aplatel87 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 5:16am
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aplatel87

I am letting the pans cool on a cake rack for 10-20 minutes.



If your cake has cooled in the pan the shortening/flour sets up and acts like glue and is preventing your cake layer bottom from releasing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aplatel87

I usually let it sit upside down and tap the edges with the knife, and it never fails, half of it still winds up in the pan!



What you're doing is letting gravity break apart your cake layer to release it...

You should let your cakes cool for only a short amount of time - about 10 mins. (indydebi has hers out of the pans within 2-3 minutes of coming out of the oven).

To remove cake layer safely from pan, you should cover the top of the cake pan with one cooling rack and turn the cake pan/cooling rack in one smooth motion - removing the pan immediately.

Then you must immediately place a second cooling rack over the cake layer and invert both cooling racks. (Try not to squeeze the two cooling racks as you're inverting the cake layer/s as hot cake is quite fragile.)

Now remove the top cooling rack, and allow the cake to cool right side up (with hump on top). Allowing the cake layer to rest on its hump for any length of time will cause the cake layer to crack while it's cooling.

HTH[/i]




WOW...thanks so much! icon_biggrin.gif

Sagebrush Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 7:04am
post #26 of 36

One more question... what altitude are you at?

I am at nearly 7,000 feet, and when I looked up altitude adjustments, one of the things mentioned in the article was to reduce the amount of sugar, and if your cakes are sticky, that can be because of too much sugar.

madgeowens Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 9:09am
post #27 of 36

ahhhh I let it cool upside down, and maybe thats my problem........never did before but had two in the past couple weeks split open...I also use parchment with just spray on sodes.........no problem sticking

ChristaPaloma Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 10:28am
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaseyrconnect

I do, however have a problem with my cakes being sticky on top. I always check with a toothpick or cake tester to see if they are done, and they come out clean. Is there something I am doing wrong, or is this a normal thing?




I have had that on occassion and I think it may be from not flipping the cake to right side up for cooling... at least in my case... other possible is maybe just need that last few minutes in the oven.... still fine tuning lol.

pattycakesnj Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 11:51am
post #29 of 36

also lower your baking temp, 350 is too high

pumpkinroses Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 12:56pm
post #30 of 36

Are your pans older? I have noticed that when I use the older pans (from before I started cake decorating) these tend to stick but my newer pans don't (mostly wilton). I grease and flour mine with no problems. The only time I use parchment paper is the 12X18 sheet cake.

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