maceyjane Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 6:56pm
post #1 of

I am making a 3 tier wedding cake 12", 9", 6" x 2"(2 layers each) using the White Almond Cream Wedding cake recipe.
Should I torte the layers and frost between them or not? I didn't know if doing this would make the cake unstable... Oh and it is covered with fondant.

48 replies
2SchnauzerLady Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 7:04pm
post #2 of

Welcome to CC maceyjane! You have come to the right place. If you are using an adequate support system for your cake, you can torte it with no problem. What support system are you using?

karenm0712 Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 7:12pm
post #3 of

I think that you will find the people on this site are about 50/50. Some cakers torte their cakes and some do not. Right now I do not torte, but then again I haven't done a wedding cake yet. icon_smile.gif

maceyjane Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 7:41pm
post #4 of

I have a really good stand and then each tier will have a cake board under it, plastic dowels in each layer with a wood dowel run from top to bottom.

maceyjane Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 7:51pm
post #5 of

I have a really good stand and then each tier will have a cake board under it, plastic dowels in each layer with a wood dowel run from top to bottom.

indydebi Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 9:29pm
post #6 of

I was one who never torted her wedding cakes (just because it wasn't common in my area and to be honest, I never heard of it or saw one until I came on CC), but I think it DOES make a really pretty cake. I've done a few since learning about it and if you're careful with the filling (reduce it proportionately between the layers), stability is not a problem at all. It sets your cake above and beyond the "regular" cakes from other places!

wrightway777 Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 6:57am
post #7 of

I like to tort and its one of the things that set me apart locally...that I take the extra time to do so. If you dam and ice your cakes with a good stable icing you will be fine.
Note: It always amazes me watching Ace of Cakes how they usually (at least the cakes that they show anyway) are not torted...and they go for thousands of $$$. With those big thick layers, I think of cornbread with a little butter between each layer everytime I see that on the shows.

tsal Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 12:16pm
post #8 of

Let me just say first that I don't do wedding cakes. I guess I'm in the minority, but I thought it was standard to torte. If you do not torte, then don't you end up with way too much cake and not enough filling/icing?

leah_s Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 1:01pm
post #9 of

I torte every cake. It's one of the things that sets me apart from the bakeries.

ttehan4 Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 1:15pm

I torte every cake too. I torted a booby cake last night..lol! I also torted a purse cake into about 12 layers and it was amazing good! It takes time to torte and fill, but I make sure I am well paid for those cakes. I love it when I have a break from it also and get the customer who wants no special filling.

As far as your cakes go you should do 2 - 2 inch layers for each tier. torte each of the 2inch layers once fill each with your filling and put icing in the middle of two stacked, does that make since. A simple torte to start.

grama_j Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 1:48pm

IF I read this correctly, you are making 2 layers of 2" cake for each tier..... you are already at 4" without filling....... How tall of a cake are you going for ? I think torting it is going to make it a tad to tall...... I'm just sayin'.......

kjt Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 2:22pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I torte every cake. It's one of the things that sets me apart from the bakeries.




How do your layers end up at exactly 4"...for the 4" SPS pillars?

I'm just finally getting (mostly) uniform layer heights, and now I find that you torte your 2" layers icon_cry.gif .

Don't mean to hijack the thread, tho, so please pm me if you think that it's not relevant to the op's question. Although I feel SPS should be used on every stacked cake icon_wink.gif !

ttehan4 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 1:11pm

Yes, I make two 2" tiers for every wedding cake. Once the cakes are leveled, filled, and trimmed, I always get a 4" cake.

kjt Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 1:15pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttehan4

Yes, I make two 2" tiers for every wedding cake. Once the cakes are leveled, filled, and trimmed, I always get a 4" cake.




But this is different from torting - splitting the 2" layers and filling between those layers as well. icon_wink.gif

ttehan4 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 1:17pm

Yes, I split the two layers as well. My wedding cakes have two layers of filling and a layer of buttercream in the middle. Starting from the top there is cake, filling, cake, buttercream, cake, filling, cake, cake board.

Im going to look for a tutorial for you. I will post as soon as I find it.

ttehan4 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 1:30pm

Well, this link used to have a tuturial on cakes from start to finish. Now she has it available on DVD. I watched the tutorial she had on her site before and it was very helpful. Maybe you should concider purchasing her DVD.

http://www.creative designs cakes.com/custom3_2.html

kjt Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 1:33pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttehan4

Yes, I split the two layers as well. My wedding cakes have two layers of filling and a layer of buttercream in the middle. Starting from the top there is cake, filling, cake, buttercream, cake, filling, cake, cake board.

Im going to look for a tutorial for you. I will post as soon as I find it.




I do torte my wedding cakes, my question for leah was about her finished layer height, but thanks for going to the trouble to help.

icon_smile.gif

maisyone2 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 1:44pm

Trying to educate here, not meaning to be a smarty pants....so please don't scream at me.

By definition (found in Webster's Dictionary) a TORTE is a CAKE no matter how many layers. The word TORTE is synonymous with CAKE.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/torte.

So, a 1 layer cake (sheet cake) is a torte. When you say you have a 2 layer cake you can also say you have a 2 layer torte....4 layer cake=4 layer torte....etc.....

It's just always been a pet peeve of mine when people use the word torte as an act of layering a cake when it defines any cake.

kjt Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 2:05pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by maisyone2

Trying to educate here, not meaning to be a smarty pants....so please don't scream at me.

By definition (found in Webster's Dictionary) a TORTE is a CAKE no matter how many layers. The word TORTE is synonymous with CAKE.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/torte.

So, a 1 layer cake (sheet cake) is a torte. When you say you have a 2 layer cake you can also say you have a 2 layer torte....4 layer cake=4 layer torte....etc.....

It's just always been a pet peeve of mine when people use the word torte as an act of layering a cake when it defines any cake.




Ahhh, how about this...
I do split, fill, ice and stack (using SPS, of course) my wedding cakes!
Thanks for the clarification thumbs_up.gif .

dailey Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 2:24pm

all my cakes are torted (4 layers of cake, 3 layers of filling), regardless of whether its for a wedding, shower, etc. invest in a Agbay, makes it a breeze!

CakeandDazzle Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 2:30pm

I bake my 2 cakes just below the pan line, then split and fill. They are alittle taller, but I think they look great that way. Thought I don't use the SPS system so exact height doesnt matter to me (do cakes have to be 4in exactly for SPS?)

kjt Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 2:34pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeandDazzle

I bake my 2 cakes just below the pan line, then split and fill. They are alittle taller, but I think they look great that way. Thought I don't use the SPS system so exact height doesnt matter to me (do cakes have to be 4in exactly for SPS?)




The SPS pillars come in different sizes, the 4" ones being the shortest. The layers do not HAVE to be that size, it just saves from having to trim the pillars.

Mike1394 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 2:42pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by maisyone2

Trying to educate here, not meaning to be a smarty pants....so please don't scream at me.

By definition (found in Webster's Dictionary) a TORTE is a CAKE no matter how many layers. The word TORTE is synonymous with CAKE.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/torte.

So, a 1 layer cake (sheet cake) is a torte. When you say you have a 2 layer cake you can also say you have a 2 layer torte....4 layer cake=4 layer torte....etc.....

It's just always been a pet peeve of mine when people use the word torte as an act of layering a cake when it defines any cake.




Free speech is a wonderful thing. Responses are also part of that freedom. To that I say SO WHAT.

mIKE

icer101 Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 2:46pm

i was taught, when you split a layer and dam and fill it, that is called torting. correct me if i am wrong. i still use that term today.

kjt Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 2:55pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by icer101

i was taught, when you split a layer and dam and fill it, that is called torting. correct me if i am wrong. i still use that term today.




As was I, icer...but apparently icon_confused.gif

I was also under the impression that a torte (when describing a type of cake) usually contained no flour...but hey - I'm just really interested the height issue...

m1m Posted 21 Feb 2010 , 3:03pm

Is there an advantage (as far as taste) to splitting the two layers and having three layers of cake and three layers of icing? icon_smile.gif

CakeandDazzle Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 4:16am

I have four layers of cake, three layers of filling, all iced with smbc... I think the taste is way better then the hunk of cake with alittle filling... and you get alittle filling with every bite!

BlakesCakes Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 4:42am
Quote:
Originally Posted by m1m

Is there an advantage (as far as taste) to splitting the two layers and having three layers of cake and three layers of icing? icon_smile.gif




Absolutely! Just as CakeandDazzle says. It makes for a better ratio of cake to filling in every bite.

Also, so many people complain of bulges when they stack 2 layers. If you tort(e) your layers, you can divide the same amount of filling over 3 areas and--voila--no bulges! To me, that makes torting worth the time and effort.

Rae

cakefort Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 7:31pm

Doesn't torting it in so many layers make it challenging to move such thin layers of cake without it breaking?

indydebi Posted 22 Feb 2010 , 8:03pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefort

Doesn't torting it in so many layers make it challenging to move such thin layers of cake without it breaking?


not if you do the cutting when it's slightly frozen, and/or using cake cardboards to move the layers of cake (slide it under the cake when you tort it .... slide it off of the cardboard when putting it back in place).

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