Trying To Smooth Out A Bad Fondant Job.

Decorating By flowers40 Updated 20 Feb 2010 , 6:39am by wrightway777

flowers40 Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 1:00am
post #1 of 6

Can anyone make any suggestions. I am doing a cake with tapered edges and am having a hard time getting smooth sides for my fondant. I did everything the topsey turvey video said to do, and that all worked out well until I did my fondant. I make my own fondant, and it doesn't have the same elasticity as professional fondant such as satin ice. When I got my fondant on, it started to crack along the top of the cake. This was not that bad, but I couldn't get the fondant on the cake before I started to get some tearing, and now I have a lot of crackls and lines. I want to try to smooth out some of the cracks and tear (repair places). Does anyone have a technique to smooth out a bad fondant job.

5 replies
Deb_ Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 1:08am
post #2 of 6

How big are the cracks?

If the fondant has set already you'll need to "warm it" a little bit.

I've used a blow dryer on LOW setting about 12" away from the cake in a back and forth motion to warm up the fondant a bit, let it rest a minute or two and then use the fondant smoother to work out the cracks.

Other times if the cracks aren't that bad I use a bit of bc to fill them in and smooth, sort of like filling in a crack in drywall.

flowers40 Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 1:34am
post #3 of 6

Thanks, I never thought about the hair drying thing. That sounds pretty good, The cracks and more like large places I had to piece together because I was trying to keep it from tearing or trying to piece it together. I think I will try some RI and see it that helps. But thanks for your great idea with the hair dryer.

Kitagrl Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 1:38am
post #4 of 6

RI is good and lots of stripes and designs placed over the boo boos. icon_smile.gif

sherrywarf Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 1:58am
post #5 of 6

If they are not big cracks, you can also use a little bit of leftover fondant, roll it into a ball, rub a side smooth on a flat surface and then rub it over the crack in a circular motion. This will usually smooth out smaller cracks and blemishes. Kind of like a sander... icon_lol.gif.

wrightway777 Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 6:39am
post #6 of 6

I agree with using RI like plaster. BC sometimes leaves a slight tell-tale shine sometimes which I find that RI does not when I'm trying to cover up 'the scene of the crime (small blemishes)'.

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