Mff, Honey Instead Of Corn Syrup

Baking By mireillea Updated 20 Feb 2010 , 1:07pm by mireillea

mireillea Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 6:02pm
post #1 of 18

Hi there!

Has anyone ever substituted the light corn syrup (which is not available here) in MFF for honey? If so, were the results any good?

TIA!

17 replies
TexasSugar Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 6:58pm
post #2 of 18

Can you find glucose? I know it is a sub for corn syrup.

mireillea Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 7:07pm
post #3 of 18

Hi TexasSugar!

I have made it with glucose and it works just fine, but it is very expensive here, so I am actually looking for a good sub.
I saw Jan's substitutions list and read that corn syrup can be substituted by treacle, honey and glucose. I just don't know if the second has the same properties (make the fondant stretch etc.). I have also made a batch of Michelle Foster's fondant with homemade syrup (water and granulated sugar), but that totally ruined the fondant. icon_cry.gif
I now keep my hopes up for honey!

Win Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 7:19pm
post #4 of 18

You can try this as well if you are able to find cream of tarter:

CORN SYRUP SUBSTITUTE
2 c. white sugar
3/4 c. water
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
Dash of salt
Combine all ingredients in a heavy, large pan. Stir and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and put cover on it for 3 minutes to get sugar crystals off the sides of the pan. Uncover and cook until it reaches soft ball stage. Stir often.
Cool syrup and store in a covered container at room temperature. It will keep for about 2 months. Makes almost 2 cups.

saffronica Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 7:37pm
post #5 of 18

I once made MFF with a corn syrup substitution and it worked just fine. I have no idea why it would work for me but not for you. I used one part water to four parts sugar (by volume) and boiled it until it was the right consistency. What did you do?

mireillea Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 7:59pm
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by saffronica

I once made MFF with a corn syrup substitution and it worked just fine. I have no idea why it would work for me but not for you. I used one part water to four parts sugar (by volume) and boiled it until it was the right consistency. What did you do?




I combined 1 1/4 water with 1/3 sugar, and let it boil, but it became real thick when it cooled off. It also became cloudy; it was not at all clear like glucose or corn syrup.

mireillea Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 8:00pm
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Win

You can try this as well if you are able to find cream of tarter:

CORN SYRUP SUBSTITUTE
2 c. white sugar
3/4 c. water
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
Dash of salt
Combine all ingredients in a heavy, large pan. Stir and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and put cover on it for 3 minutes to get sugar crystals off the sides of the pan. Uncover and cook until it reaches soft ball stage. Stir often.
Cool syrup and store in a covered container at room temperature. It will keep for about 2 months. Makes almost 2 cups.




Thanks so much Win, but cream of tartar is also a no no here. We are just a small country icon_sad.gif

TexasSugar Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 9:21pm
post #8 of 18

I would say you can always give it a try. I'm thinking since honey is more golden in color it may affect the color and honey has a stronger taste than corn syrup, so I don't know how that would play with the fondant.

You could great the next new tasting fondant though?

kansaslaura Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 9:41pm
post #9 of 18

From www.foodsubs.com



corn syrup Notes: This is a thick, sweet syrup that's popular in America, but hard to find in other countries. Unlike other sweeteners, corn syrup doesn't crystallize and turn grainy when it's cold, so it's a good choice for frostings, fudge sauces, and candies. Baked goods made with corn syrup are moister and stay fresher longer than those made with sugar. There are two types: dark corn syrup is dark brown and has a slight molasses flavor, while light corn syrup is almost clear and has a more delicate flavor. The two can be used interchangeably in many recipes. Karo is a well-known brand. Store corn syrup at room temperature. Substitutes: golden syrup (Substitute measure for measure) OR honey (This is sweeter than corn syrup, but substitute it measure for measure.) OR molasses (Substitute measure for measure.)

superwawa Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 9:42pm
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mireillea

Quote:
Originally Posted by Win

You can try this as well if you are able to find cream of tarter:

CORN SYRUP SUBSTITUTE
2 c. white sugar
3/4 c. water
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
Dash of salt
Combine all ingredients in a heavy, large pan. Stir and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and put cover on it for 3 minutes to get sugar crystals off the sides of the pan. Uncover and cook until it reaches soft ball stage. Stir often.
Cool syrup and store in a covered container at room temperature. It will keep for about 2 months. Makes almost 2 cups.



Thanks so much Win, but cream of tartar is also a no no here. We are just a small country icon_sad.gif




This is a recipe for invert sugar, right? (I make this when I make homemade marshmallows and do not want to buy invert sugar pre-made).

Someone will hopefully come along to confirm this, but I think if you do not have cream of tartar you just need another acid, like citric acid or lemon juice????

OK I just checked Wikipedia and it says "Inverted sugar syrup can be easily made by adding roughly one gram of citric acid or ascorbic acid, per kilogram of sugar. Cream of tartar (one gram per kilogram) or fresh lemon juice (10 millilitres per kilogram) may also be used."

Anyone try one of these other acids before??

saffronica Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 9:55pm
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mireillea

Quote:
Originally Posted by saffronica

I once made MFF with a corn syrup substitution and it worked just fine. I have no idea why it would work for me but not for you. I used one part water to four parts sugar (by volume) and boiled it until it was the right consistency. What did you do?



I combined 1 1/4 water with 1/3 sugar, and let it boil, but it became real thick when it cooled off. It also became cloudy; it was not at all clear like glucose or corn syrup.




That's probably the difference -- our ratios of sugar to water are very different. I'm not sure what mine was like when it cooled off, because I just added it hot to the gelatin/cream mixture. (I figured if it was going in the microwave anyway, there was no need to let it cool.)

I hope you find something that works well for you. If you try it with honey, let us know how it turns out!

mireillea Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 8:30am
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by superwawa



OK I just checked Wikipedia and it says "Inverted sugar syrup can be easily made by adding roughly one gram of citric acid or ascorbic acid, per kilogram of sugar. Cream of tartar (one gram per kilogram) or fresh lemon juice (10 millilitres per kilogram) may also be used."

Anyone try one of these other acids before??




Thanks superwawa! We have citric acid here, so I am going to try the recipe with that tonight!

noahsmummy Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 8:42am
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Win

You can try this as well if you are able to find cream of tarter:

CORN SYRUP SUBSTITUTE
2 c. white sugar
3/4 c. water
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
Dash of salt
Combine all ingredients in a heavy, large pan. Stir and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and put cover on it for 3 minutes to get sugar crystals off the sides of the pan. Uncover and cook until it reaches soft ball stage. Stir often.
Cool syrup and store in a covered container at room temperature. It will keep for about 2 months. Makes almost 2 cups.




thanks for this! We have glucose here, but it is sooo expensive! (almost $5 for a small jar) so im always trying to steer away from recipes involving corn syrup.. thanks agin for this.. cant wait to try it. =)

mireillea Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 9:10am
post #14 of 18

I just found out that soft ball stage is between 112 -115 C (234-240 F).

Win Posted 19 Feb 2010 , 4:46pm
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by superwawa

Quote:
Originally Posted by mireillea

Quote:
Originally Posted by Win

You can try this as well if you are able to find cream of tarter:

CORN SYRUP SUBSTITUTE
2 c. white sugar
3/4 c. water
1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
Dash of salt
Combine all ingredients in a heavy, large pan. Stir and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and put cover on it for 3 minutes to get sugar crystals off the sides of the pan. Uncover and cook until it reaches soft ball stage. Stir often.
Cool syrup and store in a covered container at room temperature. It will keep for about 2 months. Makes almost 2 cups.



Thanks so much Win, but cream of tartar is also a no no here. We are just a small country icon_sad.gif



This is a recipe for invert sugar, right? (I make this when I make homemade marshmallows and do not want to buy invert sugar pre-made).

Someone will hopefully come along to confirm this, but I think if you do not have cream of tartar you just need another acid, like citric acid or lemon juice????

OK I just checked Wikipedia and it says "Inverted sugar syrup can be easily made by adding roughly one gram of citric acid or ascorbic acid, per kilogram of sugar. Cream of tartar (one gram per kilogram) or fresh lemon juice (10 millilitres per kilogram) may also be used."

Anyone try one of these other acids before??




Sorry, I was away all yesterday afternoon and evening. The answer is yes. I am not a big fan of citric acid as it can very quickly and quite accidentally be over used. That being said, I have used it as well and it works fine.

As a side note: you can add (just a skimpy pinch) of citric acid to colored fondant and it will keep it from fading. icon_rolleyes.gif

Sugarflowers Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 5:39am
post #16 of 18

Honey makes an absolutely delicious fondant that is a beautiful pale, golden brown. It's only a little less white than corn syrup fondant. My son hates fondant but really liked the honey fondant.

I tried honey because the corn syrup I could get was very watery and making the fondant too soft. I used the less expensive store brand honey and had great results.

Try it, you'll love it. icon_smile.gif

Michele

mireillea Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 1:04pm
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sugarflowers



Try it, you'll love it. icon_smile.gif

Michele




Michele,

If you were not living on the other side of the ocean I would give you the biggest kiss ever!!! I am sooooo happy with your recipe! I have made several batches, some were totally ruined, some were okay, but I have now found the perfect combination of ingredients, among which my home made syrup (thanks to everyone in this post for the great ideas!!!) and additional white Merckens (thanks to Jeanne from FromScratch) and the fondant is devine!!! Way better than the brand I always used: Pettinice. And so much cheaper !
Again, thanks so much Michele, you are the best for being such a sport to share this wonderful recipe with all of us!

mireillea Posted 20 Feb 2010 , 1:07pm
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by saffronica



I hope you find something that works well for you. If you try it with honey, let us know how it turns out!



Hi Saffronica,

I haven't tried honey yet, because the syrup I made with the recipe in this post, with citric acid instead of cream of tartar worked wonderful! Thanks to you, I gave it another try. I am very happy with the results now.

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