Baking Cream Puff Question

Lounge By Knightrised Updated 23 Feb 2010 , 6:48pm by Peachshortcake

Knightrised Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 9:11am
post #1 of 15

Do we usually use just the bottom heat of the oven to bake puff pastry, or do we use *both* the top & bottom heat? Please let me know. Thanks!! icon_smile.gificon_smile.gif

14 replies
Bluehue Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 10:19am
post #2 of 15

I am thinking that the top element/ heat in your oven is what we call over here in Australia *the grill*
We would use that to make cheese on toast - cook chops etc.


The *bottom element* is what you would use to bake with - whether cakes or a quiche.

So you would use the bottom elemet Knightrised.
Not sure where you are placed on this planet - icon_smile.gif

Welcome to CC by the way.

Bluehue.

bakery_chick Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 10:19am
post #3 of 15

I am sorry are you baking puff pastry or cream puffs? Either way I think I would use "both". I am sorry, but I don't know exactly what that means. My commercial oven is a convect-a-ray so it is only on or off. My home oven has multiple settings bake, broil, etc., but I usually just use the "bake" setting when I am baking. Both puff pastry and pate a choux require a good amount of heat to set the proteins so I would guess that both the top and the bottom heat for your oven would make that happen.

Bluehue Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 10:25am
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakery_chick

I am sorry are you baking puff pastry or cream puffs? Either way I think I would use "both". I am sorry, but I don't know exactly what that means. My commercial oven is a convect-a-ray so it is only on or off. My home oven has multiple settings bake, broil, etc., but I usually just use the "bake" setting when I am baking. Both puff pastry and pate a choux require a good amount of heat to set the proteins

so I would guess that both the top and the bottom heat for your oven would make that happen.
Wouldn't that brown the cream puffs too much before they were cooked? icon_confused.gif - just wondering.
I THINK what you call *broil* is what we call *grill*
Very confusing for different countries isn't it?

Bluehue.




LaBellaFlor Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 11:45pm
post #5 of 15

Just don't set the oven on broil and to the right temp. and you'll be fine.

Chippi Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 11:56pm
post #6 of 15

I used both they came out great.......here is a pic of the ones i tried. I'm not an artist but they were delicious! Hope this is what your were asking about. lol
LL

prterrell Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 9:24pm
post #7 of 15

Oh, those are eclairs made with pate choux. Not the same thing as puff pastry. icon_biggrin.gif

Excellent article w/ recipe and how-to on pate choux at Joy of Baking:

http://www.joyofbaking.com/CreamPuffs.html

Chippi Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 9:50pm
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Oh, those are eclairs made with pate choux. Not the same thing as puff pastry. icon_biggrin.gif

Excellent article w/ recipe and how-to on pate choux at Joy of Baking:

http://www.joyofbaking.com/CreamPuffs.html




Hmm I used the same recipe and could have made them round but chose to make them longer. So they are puff pastry right? New to pastry's. I made a chocolate cream for filing.

ShanB Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 9:53pm
post #9 of 15

chippi, now I"m hungry, those look SO good.

Mike1394 Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 9:56pm
post #10 of 15

You might be thinking of cream puffs. Google, Napoleans that will show puff pastry.

Mike

Chippi Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 10:04pm
post #11 of 15

[quote="Chippi"][quote="prterrell"]Oh, those are eclairs made with pate choux. Not the same thing as puff pastry. icon_biggrin.gif


I need to start my day over hahaha! (Duh moment!) You are correct prterrell and I do know what puff pastry is you can buy, thin layers of flaky pastry. I made Baklava few times and used it. Is that what your meaning?

prterrell Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 10:10pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chippi

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Oh, those are eclairs made with pate choux. Not the same thing as puff pastry. icon_biggrin.gif

Excellent article w/ recipe and how-to on pate choux at Joy of Baking:

http://www.joyofbaking.com/CreamPuffs.html



Hmm I used the same recipe and could have made them round but chose to make them longer. So they are puff pastry right? New to pastry's. I made a chocolate cream for filing.




No, they are NOT puff pastry.

Peachshortcake Posted 23 Feb 2010 , 5:53am
post #13 of 15

Pate choux: a batter that is piped into desired shape, baked and usually filled before serving. Used for cream puffs and eclairs
Puff pastry: a dough that is layered with butter and rolled out and folded multiple times to create a flaky multi layerd pastry when baked. Also known as mille-fuille in french (eng translation: Thousand sheets) usually used for cream horns, vol-au-vents and tartes.
Filo: a paper thin pastry sheet that is layered with butter by the baker. Best known uses are in balklava and spanikopita.

All of these need to be baked in your oven, either convention or convection. DO NOT broil/grill.

Chippi Posted 23 Feb 2010 , 7:16am
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peachshortcake

Pate choux: a batter that is piped into desired shape, baked and usually filled before serving. Used for cream puffs and eclairs
Puff pastry: a dough that is layered with butter and rolled out and folded multiple times to create a flaky multi layerd pastry when baked. Also known as mille-fuille in french (eng translation: Thousand sheets) usually used for cream horns, vol-au-vents and tartes.
Filo: a paper thin pastry sheet that is layered with butter by the baker. Best known uses are in balklava and spanikopita.

All of these need to be baked in your oven, either convention or convection. DO NOT broil/grill.




Wow thank you Peach for that information! Puff pastry you actually make but is similar to Filo but is made by the chef whereas I always buy my Filo sheets. Now I want to try and make it! Making the Pate Choux was not to difficult at all. Thanks again for that great information!

Chippi

Peachshortcake Posted 23 Feb 2010 , 6:48pm
post #15 of 15

No worries Chippi. There seemed to be confussion that needed to be cleared up.
BTW you can buy really quality puff pastry too, although I personally prefer to make it when i have the time/motivation

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