Americcolor Food Pens

Decorating By Zamode Updated 16 Feb 2010 , 4:36am by Zamode

Zamode Posted 14 Feb 2010 , 11:27pm
post #1 of 12

Does anyone have these? http://www.countrykitchensa.com/catalog/product.aspx?T=1&productId=626162 If you do, would you tell me please how the fine tip works? I have Wiltons' "fine tip" and, well, they stink. thumbsdown.gificon_lol.gif I need a good fine tip marker but do not want to spend this money if they aren't worth it because I am not using them all that often.

11 replies
globalgatherings Posted 14 Feb 2010 , 11:49pm
post #2 of 12

I have them and love them thumbs_up.gif

globalgatherings Posted 14 Feb 2010 , 11:56pm
post #3 of 12

Let me clarify,I've only used them on cookies on top of hardened royal icing.

Zamode Posted 15 Feb 2010 , 2:57am
post #4 of 12

Thank you thumbs_up.gif

thin4life Posted 15 Feb 2010 , 3:14am
post #5 of 12

I have them and I really don't like them. The tips are to long and it is hard to draw a fine line.

Zamode Posted 15 Feb 2010 , 3:17am
post #6 of 12

That helps me, too, thanks!

milagros0309 Posted 15 Feb 2010 , 3:21am
post #7 of 12

i used them for long time on my cookies works wonderful

Win Posted 15 Feb 2010 , 3:21am
post #8 of 12

I have them. LOVE them. They are the best I have used --and I think you will find they are the most commonly recommended by the pros. As well, they keep their color for a very long time. I have not replaced mine in 18 months. My only caution would be not to think you need to press down hard which will crush the tip. I think they will not be an investment you will regret.

Renaejrk Posted 15 Feb 2010 , 3:24am
post #9 of 12

Mine say Americolor gourmet writer - I don't know if there is a difference, but probably not. I enjoy having mine. It is hard to get the color to be consistent, like with a regular marker - some spots seem to have absorbed more "ink" than others, so there are darker spots. This may be the case with all the edible ink markers though. You also have to make sure your fondant/gumpaste or other medium is completely dry - it is very difficult to write on it other wise!

makeminepink Posted 15 Feb 2010 , 3:35am
post #10 of 12

I couldn't get the website for those pens because I couldn't get the site to open. If they're the ones I bought, Gourmet Food Writers, I have to say that I was a little disappointed. The tips are long and flimsy, making them difficult to write or draw with. It is kind of like trying to write with a paint brush. Maybe I'm just not using the right technique.
I know this is a crazy question. I know someone brought up before using Crayola markers which are non-toxic. Don't attack me now! Why wouldn't that be ok if using the disco dust and luster dust is ok only in small amounts and on things that are not really intended for eating-- like a little fondant sign or something? It would be such a small amount anyway. I read on one of the threads that the dusts are labeled "edible" in Europe and that the US labels them "non-toxic'. As long as it's only a tiny amount, would it be any different than a child putting a marker in it's mouth?

Win Posted 15 Feb 2010 , 3:30pm
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by makeminepink

I couldn't get the website for those pens because I couldn't get the site to open. If they're the ones I bought, Gourmet Food Writers, I have to say that I was a little disappointed. The tips are long and flimsy, making them difficult to write or draw with. It is kind of like trying to write with a paint brush. Maybe I'm just not using the right technique.
I know this is a crazy question. I know someone brought up before using Crayola markers which are non-toxic. Don't attack me now! Why wouldn't that be ok if using the disco dust and luster dust is ok only in small amounts and on things that are not really intended for eating-- like a little fondant sign or something? It would be such a small amount anyway. I read on one of the threads that the dusts are labeled "edible" in Europe and that the US labels them "non-toxic'. As long as it's only a tiny amount, would it be any different than a child putting a marker in it's mouth?




makeminepink: Many who make gumpaste flowers, etc. use the non-toxic chalks found in art and scrapbooking aisles to shade them. I have never heard of anyone using Crayola-type markers but I certainly think your question is valid!

Zamode Posted 16 Feb 2010 , 4:36am
post #12 of 12

Thanks ladies. . .so, anyone use the Crayola markers?

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