Fresh Fruit Filling In A Tiered Cake Without Getting A Bulge

Decorating By Kandykin Updated 7 Feb 2013 , 6:05am by gizangel

Kandykin Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 7:05pm
post #1 of 11

Does anyone know a good recipe for fresh raspberries in a glaze as a filling for a white cake?
I have to do a 3 tiered wedding cake with "red raspberries in a glaze" as filling. As a novice at selling cakes (been giving them away for over 15 yrs), I'm anxious about getting them exactly what they want and I've never used this type of filling on a tiered cake before. I Have had problems with my other fillings being too soft and getting the dreaded bulge. Please help!

10 replies
MikeRowesHunny Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 7:22pm
post #2 of 11

Are you going to cover the cake with fondant?

Kandykin Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 7:43pm
post #3 of 11

No. Buttercream. Hope I can convince them to go with fondant - it would look so much nicer.

laventure Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 7:48pm
post #4 of 11

I just did two different wedding cakes in a row with raspberries in the filling. The key to avoiding a bulge is using a "thickened" buttercream dam. I mix alot of powdered sugar into some buttercream until it's thick enough to be rolled in a ball in your hand. I shove this in a heavy duty piping bag without a tip and pipe a 1-inch dam around the edge of the cake. This takes alot of muscle because it's so thick. Then fill the cake with frozen raspberries mixed with Seedless Raspberry Polaner All-Fruit Jam. IMPORTANT: fill the cake while the raspberries are still frozen. When you place the top cake layer on, give it a good push down, and use extra thickened buttercream to completely fill in ANY gaps on the sides of the cake. Be sure to refrigerate your cakes overnight before covering with buttercream, fondant, etc. to allow for settling of the cakes. This is an ABSOLUTE MUST--this way if any leakage has occured, you can clean up and patch it before covering the cakes. Remove from fridge the next day and trim any bulge that may have occurred in your filling dam from the settling process, then proceed as usual. The ONLY downside to this method is that the servings on the outer edge of the cake have the inch thick layer of buttercream instead of a full layer of your glorious fruit filling, but the alternative of having bulges or worse...a "bleeding" cake, are much more damaging to your reputation as a Decorator! Hope this helps!!!

laventure Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 7:54pm
post #5 of 11

I just did two different wedding cakes in a row with raspberries in the filling. The key to avoiding a bulge is using a "thickened" buttercream dam. I mix alot of powdered sugar into some buttercream until it's thick enough to be rolled in a ball in your hand. I shove this in a heavy duty piping bag without a tip and pipe a 1-inch dam around the edge of the cake. This takes alot of muscle because it's so thick. Then fill the cake with frozen raspberries mixed with Seedless Raspberry Polaner All-Fruit Jam. IMPORTANT: fill the cake while the raspberries are still frozen. When you place the top cake layer on, give it a good push down, and use extra thickened buttercream to completely fill in ANY gaps on the sides of the cake. Be sure to refrigerate your cakes overnight before covering with buttercream, fondant, etc. to allow for settling of the cakes. This is an ABSOLUTE MUST--this way if any leakage has occured, you can clean up and patch it before covering the cakes. Remove from fridge the next day and trim any bulge that may have occurred in your filling dam from the settling process, then proceed as usual. The ONLY downside to this method is that the servings on the outer edge of the cake have the inch thick layer of buttercream instead of a full layer of your glorious fruit filling, but the alternative of having bulges or worse...a "bleeding" cake, are much more damaging to your reputation as a Decorator! Hope this helps!!!

Kandykin Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 8:42pm
post #6 of 11

laventure,
Thank you - that was very helpful. I saw your cake - it was beautiful and obviously you know what you are talking about icon_smile.gif.

Do you fill the fruit upto the bc dam or just below it? should the bc frosting on the outside be slightly stiff to hold the filling in better?

My cake has to feed about 190 people, so the bottom tier would probably be over 17". Do you recommend another dam(6" circle) in the middle to prevent the top layer pushing the filling out the side of the cake ?

I really appreciate your help. Thank you.

MikeRowesHunny Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 10:11pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by naziam

laventure,
Thank you - that was very helpful. I saw your cake - it was beautiful and obviously you know what you are talking about icon_smile.gif.

Do you fill the fruit upto the bc dam or just below it? should the bc frosting on the outside be slightly stiff to hold the filling in better?

My cake has to feed about 190 people, so the bottom tier would probably be over 17". Do you recommend another dam(6" circle) in the middle to prevent the top layer pushing the filling out the side of the cake ?

I really appreciate your help. Thank you.




If your tiers are properly supported, they shouldn't cause bulging issues. Pipe your dam half an inch or so away from the edge of the cake, then when you squish it, it will go to the edges.

If you persuade them into doing fondant, then ganache is your one true friend. You will NEVER have bulging issues when you use a firm setting ganache under your fondant. I will never go back to using anything else.

Good luck with the cake!

laventure Posted 11 Feb 2010 , 2:10pm
post #8 of 11

Naz,
I honestly haven't done such a soft filling in a cake over 14"...I do like your idea about a "double-dam". Always better to take extra precaution! And yes, don't go quite to the top of the dam with the filling. Another member mentioned proper support...I agree...support the heck out of it with strong plastic pillars or dowels. About the ganache they mentioned...true, but not everyone wants it. GOOD LUCK!

Loucinda Posted 11 Feb 2010 , 4:06pm
post #9 of 11

Just a tip on the thick buttercream for the dam. Instead of breaking your hands trying to pipe that out of a bag, just roll the buttercream into a "rope" by hand and use as the dam. No bag, no hurting hands. It works like a charm. thumbs_up.gif

Kandykin Posted 11 Feb 2010 , 10:53pm
post #10 of 11

Great ideas - thank you.
Can't wait to try it out on a test cake.

gizangel Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 6:05am
post #11 of 11

hello, I saw you helped someone with a question back in 2010, I tried to open the link but it said error.  It was regarding diamond quilting on a cake to get a puffy effect.  Can you share the tutorial with me as well?

 

Thank you, God bless you
 

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