What's The Best Way To Do This...need Help!

Business By duchess1120 Updated 8 Feb 2010 , 9:09pm by danaintx

duchess1120 Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 4:42pm
post #1 of 6

I desire to turn my homebased part/time business into a full-time business in a shop. I've found the location and believe that with the right advertising I can get enough customers to quit my job (clients are decent without advertising just word of mouth).

I have not idea how to advertise to increase my business because to be honest when I get home from my job I'm exhausted and have to be mommy. I'm willing to stay up late if I need to, to do the cakes but how do I advertise when I'm at work all day.

I'm a hard worker and I have desire and vision I just need direction.


5 replies
Mensch Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 4:58pm
post #2 of 6

If you open a shop you'll be working more hours than your full time job PLUS your hobby caking.

I have posted this in other threads. There are most likely things I have forgotten/repressed, so you other bakery/storefront owners chime in.

These are just overhead costs, not even counting any baking ingredients.

monthly costs (some of these are once a year, or even just 2-3 times a year):

rent, insurance, loan payments, electricity, telephone (land-line + cell), broadband, website costs, cleaning supplies (floor cleaner, glass cleaner, universal cleaner, paper towels, dish soap, hand soap, hand disinfectant, dish detergent/drying detergent for dishwasher, toilet paper, toilet cleaner, mop, broom, dustpan, laundry detergent), credit card machine + fees, company credit card fees, assorted bank fees, sidewalk salt, alarm system costs, accountant/bookkeeping, garbage collection, office supplies (paper, pens, paper clips, staples, post-its, scissors, mat knife, paper rolls for cash register/credit card machine, ribbon for cake/pastry boxes, stamps, envelopes), edible image ink cartridges/sheets, packaging (cake/pastry boxes in different sizes, bread bags etc), cost for yearly HD inspection, garbage bags, advertising/marketing (business cards, brochures, website), bridal show fees, fees from city planning office for sidewalk signs, telephone catalog ad, take-away cups/lids for coffee drinks, light bulbs

basic start-up:

purchase of premises, renovating costs (plumber, electrician, carpenters etc), oven, ventilation system, telephones, refrigerators (3 are required); including a special 'dry' fridge for fondant cakes, freezers (2 are required), 4 hand sinks, cash register, credit card machine, double sink, commercial dishwasher, commercial espresso machine (2-group), commercial coffee mill, take-away cups/lids for coffee drinks, 20 qt standing mixer, safe, broadband, locksmith, alarm system, computer, printer, scanner, edible image software and printer, website costs, digital camera, phones (both cell and regular), office supplies (stapler, staples, paper, pens, paper rolls for register/CC machine, ribbon for cake/pastry boxes, stamps, envelopes), food handlers license (for me and all employees), cost for HD inspection, display cases, trays to display product, SS work bench (2½ meters long, special order), trash cans, garbage bags, recycling bins, marketing materials (business cards, brochures, magazine ads, website), work chairs (pony chairs, 2), counters, shelves, AC unit, rolling rack, microwave, hot plate, sidewalk signs (plus fees from planning office), signs on building (plus fees from planning office), flags, packaging (cake/pastry boxes in different sizes, bread bags, etc), telephone catalog, all different kinds of bowls and spatulas etc, hand mixer, storage containers, food processor, lighting fixtures, light bulbs, telephone catalog ad, fire extinguishers

Donnagardner Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 5:18pm
post #3 of 6

Wow, thats a bunch of good information. Most people think you can just get a tore front and start working. Boy are they in for a rude awakening.

sweetartbakery Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 8:55pm
post #4 of 6

I don't have much to offer other than the fact that I am doing just what you said. I WILL open a shop and WILL leave my job. I've been stuck in the paperwork insanity for about a month now and trying to formalize a business plan (which I most had done before). the starting process is a HUGE pain in the butt! HUGE!! So nothing to add so much as support because I"m doing the same. good luck to you! the cost list above is great to use when adding up expenses for a business plan!

tootie0809 Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 8:58pm
post #5 of 6

I can only imagine the work and time involved in opening a store front. I started my home-based business this past summer and still am in awe of the time involved in running it, and I know it is nowhere near the amount of time it takes to run and operate an actual store. The business side of things is a whole 'nother animal!

danaintx Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 9:09pm
post #6 of 6

Mensch covers a lot that people forget about! My recommendation is before anything else get a business plan, and a realistic one at that! I say that because when we first put our business plan together a year ago it was a little pie-in-the-sky and I had to get down to reality with it. Do research about trends and sales in your area. I am a CPA and had assisted with business plans previously for clients from the numbers side (different industry), but when we got serious about ours I realized how many things we had missed in the first couple of drafts. A good business plan will drive everything else you do. For us, we had a target area and target price for what we wanted to lease, as well as the condition we wanted it to be in to avoid a lot of finish out work, and we spelled that out in our plan. It meant we waited about a year to find the perfect property.

Good luck, if you have a passion and desire for it, it is worth the time and effort to put it all on paper and see if it is doable. You will find lots of great advice with a great does of reality on this board, it was a huge help to me!

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