Ack!! Did I Really Crust The Buttercream With The Wax Paper

Decorating By crazyladybaker Updated 7 Feb 2010 , 10:47pm by jojo76

crazyladybaker Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 9:41pm
post #1 of 5

UGH>>>someone help! I have been working so hard on this cake and I have made a big boo boo.

It's a two layer chocolate covered in vanilla bean buttercream. Well, I put my crumbcoat on it and put it in the fridge to speed things up.
After about 30 minutes it dawned on me that I forgot to pull out my strips of wax paper at the bottom of the cake. You know...the strips you put down to keep the cake board nice and clean?

So, I dash in there and take it out and very gently tug on one of those strips. Nope...it's in there! If I pull it its going to destroy my crumb layer and I have VERY little of that frosting left.

If I set it out and bring it back to room temp will the paper come out without ruining the crumb coat?

ugh...I am so dumb! thumbsdown.gif

4 replies
kelleym Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 10:19pm
post #2 of 5

If it's just the crumb coat, then I would hold a knife or small offset spatula against the buttercream and pull out the wax paper.

Just FYI, putting it in the fridge won't make it crust faster. It does harden the icing, but real "crusting" is what happens because of the ratio of sugar to fat. In fact, for a true crust to form, it's better to leave it at room temperature because the air inside your refrigerator is very humid/moist and can actually inhibit the crust from forming.

Are you covering it with fondant?

crazyladybaker Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 10:23pm
post #3 of 5

Whew! I did what you suggested and it worked. Lesson learned icon_eek.gif
Thanks for the tip on crusting. I didn't realize that and really appreciate you sharing that with me.

It is now on the cabinet waiting to re-crust...lol

Yes, I am going to cover it in fondant...cross your fingers for me because I really want this cake to turn out nice.

Thanks!

kelleym Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 10:46pm
post #4 of 5

Glad it worked out.

You don't really need a crust in order to apply fondant.

However, many people freeze their cakes for a short period of time (10-15 minutes) prior to applying fondant. This gives the cake some firmness while you lay the heavy fondant over it and smoothing it.

jojo76 Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 10:47pm
post #5 of 5

glad you got it sorted, good luck with the rest of the cake!!

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