Sugar Free Cupcake Was Awful..

Baking By HarleyDee Updated 18 Feb 2010 , 1:06am by denette

HarleyDee Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 3:08am
post #1 of 12

Please bear in mind I've never made anything sugar free. I did some experimenting last night, and it was kinda bad.

I used a white cake batter recipe (not a box mix) and bought some sugar substitute. On the bag, it said it measured cup for cup just like sugar. So I mixed it all up, and I could tell the batter didn't look right. I put it in cupcake tins, and it didn't rise hardly at all. The tops came out crunchy and looking like the salt flats, all cracked and stuff. It didn't taste too bad, but I'm afraid to even know what a cake layer would look like.

Any thoughts?

11 replies
prterrell Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 3:27am
post #2 of 12

I'm guessing this was Splenda? According to their own literature, you need to either use the Splenda-sugar mix for baking OR use 1/2 Splenda and 1/2 sugar. This is because sugar substitutes cannot replicate sugar's role in the chemistry of baking.

mandymakescakes Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 3:38am
post #3 of 12

I use Erythritol (Diabetic Safe), found it at Whole Foods and you use a 1/3 less of it than regular sugar. It worked perfectly in cake, not so great in icing... the flavor was good, but the texture was a little 'crunch'. It's a fine grain, like granulated sugar, but it doesn't melt/dissolve as quickly.

HarleyDee Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 3:53am
post #4 of 12

It was Wal-Mart's brand of Splenda. I didn't know what to expect, and knew as soon as I opened the bag that the texture wouldn't work the same as sugar. I just went with it to see what would happen.

So, now that I know that it doesn't work that way, I'm needing a sugar free cupcake recipe, should anyone ever ask for one.

JodieF Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 2:21pm
post #5 of 12

If you're trying to find a recipe that "safe" for diabetics, you aren't really going to find one. It's not just about the sugar, it's about the carbs. Carbohydrates are what cause blood sugar to spike, and that includes sugar, flour, rice....basically anything white except for cauliflower!
So, even if you come up with something tasty that doesn't have sugar, then the white flour is still a problem. And, usually, the fat content is incredibly high, to try and make up for the lack of sugar!
Honestly, with the exception of a pretty tasty sugar free cheesecake recipe I found, my mom would rather adjust her insulin for the day and have a very small piece of a "real" dessert than have a not so good bigger piece of any sugar free baked good. They're usually tasteless or just plain gross.

Jodie

mandymakescakes Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 6:13pm
post #6 of 12

I agree with JodieF, my brother is diabetic and controls it with diet as well. Funny thing is, he was never a sweets fan until he was told he shouldn't have any.

I do know families, though, who opt for sugar-free whenever possible just to limit the amount they themselves as well as their children are ingesting. It's always great to have good sugar-free recipes on hand. You can search diabetic friendly recipes on websites like bestdiabeticrecipes.com and diabeticgourmet.com. It's just trial and error until you find one that tastes good. Let us know when you find a winner! icon_biggrin.gif

Adevag Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 7:36pm
post #7 of 12

There is also a fairly new product (at least it's new where I live) called "Whey Low" and I have seen it at Whole foods. You follow regular recipe and substitute the same amount of Whey Low as the recipe calls for sugar.
According to what it says on the bag, it has low glycemic index and is safe for type 1 and 2 diabetics. It is also 75 % less calories than sugar (and according to them tastes just like sugar). They also make powdered sugar substitutes.
If you are worried about white flour you could always try using whole wheat pastry flour, but I'm sure you know already... thumbs_up.gif

GI Posted 9 Feb 2010 , 6:52pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mandymakescakes

I use Erythritol (Diabetic Safe), found it at Whole Foods and you use a 1/3 less of it than regular sugar. It worked perfectly in cake, not so great in icing... the flavor was good, but the texture was a little 'crunch'. It's a fine grain, like granulated sugar, but it doesn't melt/dissolve as quickly.




Curious, can the sugar be ground again, to make it finer texture before putting it in the batter?

mandymakescakes Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 2:51am
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by GI

Quote:
Originally Posted by mandymakescakes

I use Erythritol (Diabetic Safe), found it at Whole Foods and you use a 1/3 less of it than regular sugar. It worked perfectly in cake, not so great in icing... the flavor was good, but the texture was a little 'crunch'. It's a fine grain, like granulated sugar, but it doesn't melt/dissolve as quickly.



Curious, can the sugar be ground again, to make it finer texture before putting it in the batter?




Sorry I'm late in replying, just started a new job after 3 months of unemployed bliss... It's been harder to get back into the swing of things than I thought it would be! icon_razz.gif

Anyway, that is very possible... I'm looking at some now and I think what I missed before is that the product isn't uniform in granule size. I'll have to run it through a blender before using it the next time. GREAT IDEA, thanks!!!

prterrell Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 1:51pm
post #10 of 12

I just developed this recipe. It's pretty good. Doesn't have the same exact taste as a regular cupcake, but doesn't taste nasty. The applesauce helps replicate the moisture and texture provided by regular sugar and adds a little sweetness that balances the aftertaste of the Splenda. Folding in whipped egg whites at the end helps provide the extra lift that is needed in sugar-free recipes. Using whole grain flour helps with the carb issue.

1 c (1/2 pound) unsalted butter, room temp
1 c Splenda granular
1 c (8 oz) unsweetened applesauce
2 whole large eggs
2 egg whites from large eggs, whipped stiff but not dry
3/4 tsp salt
1 tbsp baking powder
1-1/2 tsp vanilla extract
3 c whole grain cake or pastry flour (available at Whole Foods)
1-1/4 c water
1.3 oz dry milk powder

Preheat oven to 350 F
Cream butter, beat in Splenda and applesauce (mixture will look curdled)
Add whole eggs, one at a time
Add vanilla to water and set aside
Sift together the flour, milk powder, salt and baking soda
Add 1/3 of sifted dry ingredients, mixing until moistened
Add 1/2 of water, mixing until incorporated
Repeat addition of dry ingredients and water
Add remaining dry ingredients
Scrap bowl down very well, on the sides and bottom.
Mix batter on high for about 30 seconds for a stand mixer and 1 minute for a hand mixer
Fold whipped egg whites into batter by hand.
Bake in a 350 F oven, about 12 min for mini cupcakes, about 20 for regular.

I wasn't happy with the icing I made for these. It was just okay. Am thinking about trying honey or agave syrup, but am unsure if those are safe for diabetics?

HarleyDee Posted 17 Feb 2010 , 5:02pm
post #11 of 12

This sounds like a pretty good recipe! I'll have to give it a try, thanks icon_smile.gif

denette Posted 18 Feb 2010 , 1:06am
post #12 of 12

I LOVE Whey Low! I use it all the time! I don't know if you're looking for a dessert or just a cupcake, but you could always try an individual chocolate souffle. There is no flour in it and if you use dark chocolate, there is not as many carbs as milk chocolate. Just an idea.

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