How Much Ganache

Decorating By MissCakeCrazy Updated 10 Feb 2010 , 5:34pm by Bluehue

MissCakeCrazy Posted 6 Feb 2010 , 1:34pm
post #1 of 30

I am going to be covering a 6" and 10" cake in white chocolate ganache before I cover in fondant. Exactly how much white chocolate and cream am I meant to use? I know that the ratio should be 3:1 but don't know the quantities.

29 replies
Melnick Posted 6 Feb 2010 , 1:42pm
post #2 of 30

I'm not sure of the exact quantities but I'd do at least 1.2kg of chocolate. Maybe more. Hopefully someone else can be more helpful but at least it is a starting point. If you use 1200g chocolate it is 400ml cream (or 400g cream). Don't forget to make sure you use pure cream and don't use white eating chocolate. I made both those mistakes!!!

sheilabelle Posted 6 Feb 2010 , 1:44pm
post #3 of 30

Melnick, what do you mean "white eating chocolate". What other kind is there. Candy melts? Thanks for clarifying.

Melnick Posted 6 Feb 2010 , 2:12pm
post #4 of 30

I'm not sure what you call it but I assume Candy melts is what I'm talking about - cooking chocolate in other words. The white eating chocolate has something in it to keep it a little bit softer so it doesn't set properly.

Melnick Posted 6 Feb 2010 , 2:16pm
post #5 of 30

The other thing if you haven't made ganache before, is that when you are boiling your cream, don't walk away from it. As soon as it hits a rolling boil you need to get it off the hotplate. If you leave it too long you'll wreck the whole ganache - it seems to curdle like when you get water in chocolate and no matter how long you leave it, it never sets. Learnt that the hard way too .... several times!!!!! (very expensive lesson!!)

MissCakeCrazy Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 12:12pm
post #6 of 30

I have a cake recipe book which explains how to do ganache and it does not require you heating the cream so i have never heated the cream and it has turned out just as good. Is there a reason why you would heat the cream? Seems there is no point...

Melnick Posted 7 Feb 2010 , 1:06pm
post #7 of 30

I believe you heat the cream to change its composition so that the cream doesn't go off? I have always heated the cream, then added it to the chocolate. The heat of the cream melts the chocolate.

MissCakeCrazy Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 11:31am
post #8 of 30

I melt the chcolate then whisk in the cream. So does heating the cream definitely make it last longer without putting the ganache in the fridge?

crazyladybaker Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 11:43am
post #9 of 30

My directions say to boil the cream briefly as well. I have not covered any cakes in it but that one of the things on my to do list. I want to see if it helps me get a smoother working surface for my fondant.

Can't wait to see how you like it. Be sure to come back and share your results.
Thanks!

Melnick Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 11:53am
post #10 of 30

I found this on Cakes and More Blog (all about ganache)
http://www.cakesandmore.org/blog/2009/06/a-guide-to-ganache/

Doesnt the cream go off when you leave the ganache out?

When you make ganache, you boil the cream, this alters the structure of the cream and once you add the chocolate to it, it can be kept much longer, you can pretty much ignore the use by date then. You can keep it out of the fridge as well, just think truffles, which is basically what ganache is, if it overly bothers you add a little liquor as this acts as a further preservative. You should still practice safe food practices at all times. If you want to hear it from the other professionals it has been a topic on Planet Cake forum as well http://www.planetcake.com.au/forums/viewtopic.php?t=214

MissCakeCrazy Posted 9 Feb 2010 , 9:17pm
post #11 of 30

Thanks. I went on the link and ys explained about a glaze coating to put ontop of the ganache before you put on the fondant. What is this and is it necessary?

Rosie2 Posted 9 Feb 2010 , 11:14pm
post #12 of 30

Hi, I have a quick question....I couldn't find heavy cream in my grocery store but I found whipping cream(liquid) and buttercream...can I use any of those to make liquid(poured) ganache???

Melnick Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 7:29am
post #13 of 30

The glaze is boiled strained Apricot Jam that you brush all over the cake. It is a syrup that makes the cake moist. It isn't necessary but it is a pretty easy and effective step to incorporate.

I'm not sure about the cream. I use Pure Cream and I have never made poured ganache. Maybe pm Rylan. He knows a fair bit about ganache

Elise87 Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 7:44am
post #14 of 30

melnick: so you should use cooking chocolate whether it be white, milk or dark choc?

Melnick Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 8:35am
post #15 of 30

I tend to use the Nestle melts in which ever I feel like - dark, milk or white. I like the taste of them. Others swear by using the couverture (cooking chocolate) like Lindt (from the cooking aisle not the eating aisle) but it is very expensive. I have used blocks of Cadbury milk chocolate too and that was fine but when I tried Cadbury Dream it never set and was a big runny mess!

Elise87 Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 9:36am
post #16 of 30

Ohhh ok i see, thanks for the help melnick icon_smile.gif

Lazysuze Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 10:07am
post #17 of 30

You should always bring the cream to the boil as mentioned before in order to alter the structure so it lasts alot longer.
I also let it cool down to about 80 degrees C before I pour it over the chocolate otherwise I find it can make the ganache go all 'gloopy' then it is hard to spread and when cold will cause a layer of fat to appear on the surface.
Just my observations through many trials and errors!

MissCakeCrazy Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 12:08pm
post #18 of 30

I made ganache this morning but didn't boil the cream. I will have it refrierated until sunday. How much shorter is its life period than boiled cream? I am planning to have a tasting on Sunday, then I plan to put the rest of the ganache in the freezer. How long will it last? Will it last shorter than boiled?

Melnick Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 12:42pm
post #19 of 30

I don't know. My guess would be, probably for as long as the expiry date on the cream?

Bluehue Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 12:44pm
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

I made ganache this morning but didn't boil the cream. I will have it refrierated until sunday. How much shorter is its life period than boiled cream?
It will only be good for as long as the use by date on the carton of cream.
So, if the date is for this Saturday - then your cream/chocolate sauce won't be any good for this Sunday.
That is why you bring the cream to the boil and add it to the firm chocolate - not the other way around.
Plus the taste is different...as you have not altered the structue of the cream.
I am planning to have a tasting on Sunday, then I plan to put the rest of the ganache in the freezer. icon_confused.gif How long will it last? Only as long as the date on the carton of cream. Will it last shorter than boiled? Yes.
By boiling the cream you can keep ganache in the freezer for a good month or more.
By doing it your way - it won't last very long at all.
Plus you will probably find that it seperates after thawing - because it isn't ganache.
It is chocolate sauce - more or less.

Bluehue


MissCakeCrazy Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 12:58pm
post #21 of 30

The carton says best before 15th I think so I can have it this sunday for a tasting. Next time I do it, when I bring the cream to the boil, do I directly pour it onto the hard chocolate? Will it be able to melt the choc completely?

Bluehue Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 1:06pm
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

The carton says best before 15th I think so I can have it this sunday for a tasting.
You will just get there with a day to spare - icon_wink.gificon_smile.gif - However, just have a taste test a couple of hours before you offer it to anyone - rembering that the date on the carton is only a guide - not a guarantee. Next time I do it, when I bring the cream to the boil, do I directly pour it onto the hard chocolate? Yes, that is correct - Bring the cream to the boil - wait a few seconds and then remove from the heat - wait a few more seconds and the gently pour over your broken up chocolate pieces. Will it be able to melt the choc completely? Yes it will -
If you wish - place your broken chocolate in the bowl of your mixer - gently pour boiled cream over - wait a few moments and then (standing out of splatter range icon_wink.gif ) - turn your mixer on to it lowest speed and the chocolate will dissolve into the heated cream.

It really is that easy

Or you can just us a spatular - or mixing spoon - choice is yours.

Happy ganaching icon_smile.gif

Bluehue


MissCakeCrazy Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 1:09pm
post #23 of 30

Thanks, is there any chance it may curdle / sperate when you are doing this?

Bluehue Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 1:16pm
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

Thanks, is there any chance it may curdle / sperate when you are doing this?

No - all you have to do is watch the cream carefully - which i think someone mentioned in an earlier post - as once the cream starts to bubble it is only a short time before it boils.

Just allow it to boil for a few seconds - that is all it needs - truely.

If you have ever boiled cream before you will know that there is a very fine line between it smelling like cream - and smelling burnt.

You will do fine - and once you do it there will be no looking back icon_smile.gifthumbs_up.gif

Bluehue



MissCakeCrazy Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 4:40pm
post #25 of 30

tomorrow I will be making a ganache with sour cream and double cream mixed with white chocolate. Will the 2 creams be Ok boiling together?

Bluehue Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 5:00pm
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

tomorrow I will be making a ganache with sour cream and double cream mixed with white chocolate. Will the 2 creams be Ok boiling together?

Q: Why are you using sour cream ? What taste are you trying to achieve icon_confused.gificon_confused.gif

You do realise that the consistancey of sour cream is nothing like that of thickened cream - so i don't understand why you would want to even use it - it will serve no purpose.

You are also aware of the componants of white chocolate aren't you

Sorry - but are you serious - or is this a wind up?

Bluehue.



MissCakeCrazy Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 5:09pm
post #27 of 30

I was told by someone from cc that sour cream may be a good idea if I am going to make a carrot cake, it will compliment the flavour. I know to add extra white chocolate.

Bluehue Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 5:17pm
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

I was told by someone from cc that sour cream may be a good idea if I am going to make a carrot cake, it will compliment the flavour. I know to add extra white chocolate.

Ummmm, ok - but my belief is that you would be defeating the purpose of making ganache.
With the white chocolate and the cream you would then loose the *sour cream* taste - so i don't understand exactely what someone would hope to achieve by adding sour cream.
It really wouldn't knock the sweetness down - it would just get lost.

Hmmmm, what about using a lemon frosting - have you thought of that?
It could be more compatiable with the carrot cake.
Or a cream cheese frosting.

Considering the carrot cake is more of a sovoury taste and the ganache is a sweet taste.

Yes, i know carrot cakes can taste sweet - but i would not put ganache on a carrot cake - two sonflicting tastes - imo.



MissCakeCrazy Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 5:22pm
post #29 of 30

I decided to do a ganache for the reasons of having a smooth surface when putting on the fondant. I am going to make a lemon cake with cream cheese filling with lemon curd and a carrot cake with cream cheese filling. Both will be covered in white choc ganache.

Bluehue Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 5:34pm
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

I decided to do a ganache for the reasons of having a smooth surface when putting on the fondant. I am going to make a lemon cake with cream cheese filling with lemon curd and a carrot cake with cream cheese filling. Both will be covered in white choc ganache.




Ok - but in all honestly - think i would loose the sour cream icon_wink.gif
Not that i have tasted ganache with sour cream - don't think i really want too - icon_biggrin.gif

I am thinking that you just won't get the *setting up* you will require under your fondant.
Would hate to think that your fondant started to sag/droop/fold because
the underneath was to soft.

Again - just MO.

Bluehue

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