Dumb Question. Feeling A Little Stupid Right About Now!!

Decorating By shelbycompany Updated 5 Feb 2010 , 10:12pm by JustToEatCake

shelbycompany Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 5:24pm
post #1 of 13

Ok, so I found out about a local cake competition and was thinking about entering. I looked up the rules online and it says "no foreign techniques". icon_confused.gif What exactly does that mean? I want to follow the rules. Thanks for your help!! icon_smile.gif

12 replies
AverageMom Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 5:27pm
post #2 of 13

That sounds downright weird! I'll be watching to find out.

prterrell Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 5:29pm
post #3 of 13

icon_confused.gif Wow, that makes no sense! You're going to have to contact the competition's organizers for an explanation.

metria Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 5:38pm
post #4 of 13

um ... that is weird ... maybe like, no icing an entire cake with royal icing? uncommon in the US, but more common in other countries...

leah_s Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 5:41pm
post #5 of 13

No Lambeth.

TitiaM Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 5:45pm
post #6 of 13

From what I understand Foreign techniques usually refer to fondant, and rolled icings, and collars things like that. So no foreign techniques would be cakes decorated in buttercream, or royal.

Usually there are different categories for Foreign techniques and no Foreign techniques.

Contact someone at the show for more specific details--the rules are different for different shows.

all4cake Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 5:54pm
post #7 of 13

Are you able to contact them for clarification? It's a legitimate question.

cheeseball Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 6:02pm
post #8 of 13

That isn't a dumb question, they should have specified what they meant icon_confused.gif. I mean, it wasn't that long ago where fondant was 'foreign'.

Kimmers971 Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 6:28pm
post #9 of 13

The Great American Cake Show lists:
Special Techniques: Cakes entered in this category should highlight one or more special techniques. Examples would
be needlework, cocoa or food color painting, bas relief, appliqué, crimping, lace points, collars, bridge/extension work,
gum paste dolls, etc. Typical mediums include rolled fondant, royal icing, gum paste, pastillage, pulled/blown sugar,
and marzipan. Note that some special techniques may be incorporated in other categories as well.
International/Special Techniques: In addition to the Special Techniques listed above, cakes identifiable as following
a particular foreign style such as Lambeth, Nirvana, South African, Australian, etc. should be classified here.

Hope this helps.

JustToEatCake Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 6:30pm
post #10 of 13

That's a silly rule because here in the US almost everything is foreign. And why they wouldn't let Lambeth is absurd because to us, as the previous poster said fondant is foreign and newer than Lambeth.

I contacted them before, and they do reply fairly quickly. I contacted about prizes and they said ribbons and "maybe" trophies but they weren't sure on the trophy part yet.

prterrell Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 7:13pm
post #11 of 13

That, and alot of the special techniques mentioned are part of the Lambeth style. icon_confused.gif

TitiaM Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 7:53pm
post #12 of 13

The rules are so different for every show, it's going to depend upon which show you are entering--the rules vary a HUGE amount. I had the same question when I first entered a competition. And then researching other ones--they all define things differently (sometimes they have it spelled out in the rules, and sometimes you need to ask for more information.)

JustToEatCake Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 10:12pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitiaM

The rules are so different for every show, it's going to depend upon which show you are entering--the rules vary a HUGE amount. I had the same question when I first entered a competition. And then researching other ones--they all define things differently (sometimes they have it spelled out in the rules, and sometimes you need to ask for more information.)



This is a local festival that has just decided to have a cake contest. It's their first. I relaly don't think they know what they are doing. As prt stated some of those things are Lambeth method.

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