CAKE_NEWBIE Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 1:35pm
post #1 of

Hi ladies. my sons bday is this saturday and i baked and froze the cake rounds last saturday to save myself some time. I am planning on defrosting the rounds and filling and crumb coating them tonight and putting them back in the fridge until tomorrow and decorating tomorrow night. I brought some Satin Ice fondant last night and this is my 1st time using it. My question is will the fondant be ok going on a cold cake straight from the fridge or should I let the iced cake sit for a bit before putting the fondant on? Im new to freezing cake and new to using satin ice. im just trying to avoid a disaster of waking up saturday morning for the party and the cake is ruined and im scrambling to make a new cake icon_cry.gif

21 replies
greengyrl26 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 1:45pm
post #2 of

Yes, absolutely!!! I only cover cold cakes...makes things so much easier!

If it helps, here's my schedule:

Day 1: Bake, cover in saran wrap & chill
Day 2: level, torte, crumb coat & cover in frosting & chill
Day 3: Cover in fondant & decorate.

Caths_Cakes Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 1:47pm
post #3 of

the only issue with covering a cold cake is that the fondant can sweat, it can get a little sticky, this isnt a problem if you leave the cake alone once its iced, the sweat will evaporate and youll have a lovely cake, but you need to work quickly while covering the cake with the fondant.

momma28 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 2:04pm
post #4 of

I always chill me cakes before covering and decorating, you'll be fine. Happy Birthday to your son icon_smile.gif

gmorriello Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 2:20pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by greengyrl26

Yes, absolutely!!! I only cover cold cakes...makes things so much easier!

If it helps, here's my schedule:

Day 1: Bake, cover in saran wrap & chill
Day 2: level, torte, crumb coat & cover in frosting & chill
Day 3: Cover in fondant & decorate.




Do you deliver on day three as well. How long does the cake stay fresh tasting?

Marianna46 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 2:46pm
post #6 of

Where you live, you should have no problems with putting fondant on a cold cake and putting it back in the fridge. I live in a hot, humid climate and I could never do either of these. The fondant cover on the ones I've done either one of these things to has just drawn so much moisture that the fondant has dissolved (I generally use FondX, but sometimes I use MFF). The other thing I can't do here is put a buttercream base under the fondant. My crumb coat has to be a really thin coat of strained preserves, which I have to leave to get tacky before I put the fondant down. Just a heads up for anyone who lives in a climate like this. I'd be interested to know whether people who live in places like Houston or Miami have problems like these. Oh, yeah, I have no AC in my kitchen, just a couple of ceiling fans.

cakesdivine Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 2:49pm
post #7 of

You should always cover your cake cold. If not and you make a mistake all the BC or ganache will come right off the cake if you have to remove the fondant and try again.

mskavon Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 4:37pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by greengyrl26

Yes, absolutely!!! I only cover cold cakes...makes things so much easier!

If it helps, here's my schedule:

Day 1: Bake, cover in saran wrap & chill
Day 2: level, torte, crumb coat & cover in frosting & chill
Day 3: Cover in fondant & decorate.




this is how i usually do it too. i only decorate part-time, so i do most of it in the evenings. it makes it a whole lot easier for me icon_smile.gif

mamawrobin Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 4:46pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesdivine

You should always cover your cake cold. If not and you make a mistake all the BC or ganache will come right off the cake if you have to remove the fondant and try again.




Absolutely!

cgm_cakes Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 8:38pm

This was very helpful - thanks for posting the question!

greengyrl26 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 9:56pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmorriello

Quote:
Originally Posted by greengyrl26

Yes, absolutely!!! I only cover cold cakes...makes things so much easier!

If it helps, here's my schedule:

Day 1: Bake, cover in saran wrap & chill
Day 2: level, torte, crumb coat & cover in frosting & chill
Day 3: Cover in fondant & decorate.



Do you deliver on day three as well. How long does the cake stay fresh tasting?




I deliver on day 3 if possible, but usually on day 4. I only do this part-time (after my day job), so I can only decorate at night, and most of my cakes are due on Friday evening or Saturday morning. icon_smile.gif

baycheeks1 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 10:05pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marianna46

Where you live, you should have no problems with putting fondant on a cold cake and putting it back in the fridge. I live in a hot, humid climate and I could never do either of these. The fondant cover on the ones I've done either one of these things to has just drawn so much moisture that the fondant has dissolved (I generally use FondX, but sometimes I use MFF). The other thing I can't do here is put a buttercream base under the fondant. My crumb coat has to be a really thin coat of strained preserves, which I have to leave to get tacky before I put the fondant down. Just a heads up for anyone who lives in a climate like this. I'd be interested to know whether people who live in places like Houston or Miami have problems like these. Oh, yeah, I have no AC in my kitchen, just a couple of ceiling fans.




I'm from Houston...I actually just did a cake this week where I had it carved (It's the Camera cake), crumb coated with BC and put in the fridge for a few hours...put black fondant on it and then put it back in the fridge until the next day when I could finish. Took it out the fridge for a few hours to make sure it didnt sweat or for it to dry if it did and I didnt have any problems. Then applied all the extra decorations and it was fine. Then again, right now it is a little chilly...but I've still hadnt had a problem with puttin the fondant on.

leslie2748 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 10:45pm

If you deliver on day 4, do you put your fondant covered cake in the fridge overnight?
I did that once, but made the mistake of not pulling it out soon enough, and the cake was practically frozen in the middle...any ideas or tips anyone icon_surprised.gif)

baycheeks1 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 11:21pm

Take it out several hours before u need to finish anything on it...it will come back to room temp and be fine...

leslie2748 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 11:26pm

OK....does it take longer to defrsost because it is covered in fondant or is it no different than buttercream?
I am always nervous about refrigeration..just cant seem to get it right.

baycheeks1 Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 5:03am

I was nervous the first time I put one in the fridge with fondant on it...and it did sweat...but I remembered that it isnt supposed to be messed with until it is dry...

But after the first one you know if it sweats to leave it alone and let it dry...and if it doesn't like my last one did...then you're good to go with decorations and things...

MARTIEQZ Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 10:42pm

I'm from Houston, too and I refrigerate ALL my cakes. They are either BC or MMF. They may be shiny for a bit, but no problems.

tarheelgirl Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 10:53pm

I also do mine cold.. this way no fondant is thrown out when I have a tear or imperfection and it has to be re-applied. I usually take all of my cakes out of refrigeration an hour or two before delivery this way nothing is cold when its served at a clients party.

leslie2748 Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 10:53pm

ANOTHER QUESTION icon_surprised.gif)
What if you put a fondant cake with edible images on it int o the fridge...is it true if it sweats then the image will run?

baycheeks1 Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 11:35pm

IDK about the edible image...chances are you need to put the EI after you take it from the fridge....

Marianna46 Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 2:50pm

Well, I just got to find out how the rest of you live! We've been having an uncharacteristic cool spell here in Cancún and I made a fondant-covered cake yesterday. Absolutely no problems! The fondant went on like a dream and didn't sag or sweat. I even crumb-coated the cake in boiled-milk buttercream (my latest great discovery - the recipe's here on CC), and had no problems with the fondant turning watery. Of course, I always forget to say that my kitchen doesn't have AC, which I imagine most homes in the US do. If your kitchen is cool, everything probably works like it should, no matter where you live!!

This has been a really fascinating post. I've learned so much!! By the way, baycheeks1, I'm a Houston native, too (Bellaire, but I had a cousin in Pearland). I miss the old place! But I never had a kitchen with AC there, either, so you can tell I've been gone a long time.

Peridot Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 3:38pm

I do the same thing that greengryl26 does.

1. Bake and freeze a week ahead of time and unthaw cakes night before I want to use
2. Level, torte, fill, crumb coat and let settle over night
3. Ice with BC and lay fondant and decorate
4. Deliver

No problem with cake drying out as the icing and fondant form a seal and keep the cake moist.

I made a poinsettia Christmas cake for a friend of mine for a gift and gave it to her on the 23rd of December and she liked it so much and wanted all of her family to see it. She did not cut it until New Year's Eve!!! When she told me that I was horrified and said the cake must have been terrible - either dried out or soggy from sitting all of that time. Oh no, she said it was great, still very moist and it was not soggy and everyone just loved it and couldn't get enough!!!!

I certainly am not advocating keeping a cake that long for heavens sake!!! That would have been about 12 days from my removing it from the freezer to her serving it. Filling was made with Bettercreme and BC was made with coffee creamer. I asked her where she kept the cake - she told me she had a four seasons porch and she kept it in the covered box I had it in and it stayed nice and cool out there and it stays warm enough that it didn't freeze. Her mother used to have a cake business doing wedding cakes so she knows all about cakes and decorating (her mom has passed away).

The cake must have been good because her future husband wanted her to ask me to do their wedding cake. I declined - sorry I just do this as a hobby.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%