summernoelle Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 10:46pm
post #1 of

Hi Everyone,

Last week I experimented with Isomalt for the first time. It didn't go well. I could never get the sediment to go away completly-there were always small white particles that never dissolved.
I did try straining it.
I finally ended up pouring it into my molds, and when it set, there were huge white flakes in it. It looked terrible!

What temperature should I be boiling it to, and with how much water?

Also, an additional question, I am wanting to make Cinderella's glass slipper. Does anyone have advice on how I can get the two halves of the shoe to come together without a large seam down the middle?

Thanks!

42 replies
Renaejrk Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 10:58pm
post #2 of

I had the same problem with Isomalt - I just haven't had time/materials to play with it more and figure it all out! Hopefully someone will help.

summernoelle Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 11:39pm
post #3 of

Yes, I hope so! Very frustrating that there were no directions on the bag.

Renaejrk Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 11:45pm
post #4 of

I know, and sugar or isomalt aren't easy to work with just starting out anyway. I have been reading posts, etc. to get help, but I really wanted to just try it out and see what it was like, I don't have the $$$ to make the heating box and get special equipment for it yet. I was making the jewels, but it was hard to pour such a tiny amount - the backs kind of bulged when I wanted them flat because there was too much sugar in the mold.

bettinashoe Posted 2 Feb 2010 , 12:03am
post #5 of

Great post. I just ordered my first isomalt--it hasn't arrived yet but I was really looking forward to getting it and playing with it. Now, you're making me wonder if it's going to be more trouble than rewarding. I'm hoping someone can give good direction before mine arrives.

summernoelle Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 3:04am
post #6 of

Bump.

moydear77 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 3:19pm
post #7 of

No water and bring it to 330*. Do not stir. It will cause air bubbles. You have to bring it to 330* or it will start to melt eventually. HTH

summernoelle Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 3:46pm
post #8 of

NO water? How does it dissolve?

Thanks Moydear. icon_smile.gif

tiggy2 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 4:00pm
post #9 of

The latest tutorial on the home page of CC has detailed instructions on working with isomalt. It's a beer bottle mold tutorial but the last video show how to melt and pour the isomalt and tells what temperatures to use. HTH

sugartforyou Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 4:00pm

Check in the forum area for MYOM (Make your own molds) and read the posts for isomalt. He sells isomalt and helps whomever interested to know about the subject. At least for me, it was very helpful reading through the post before attempting anything. HTH

bobwonderbuns Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 4:02pm

I just bought my first bag of Isomalt and I'm itching to get into it, but like y'all I'm reading everything I can on it first. Now somewhere along the line I read only use distilled water and a nylon pastry brush. I'm curious as to Moydear's no water and no stirring method.

tiggy2 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 4:12pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

I just bought my first bag of and I'm itching to get into it, but like y'all I'm reading everything I can on it first. Now somewhere along the line I read only use distilled water and a nylon pastry brush. I'm curious as to Moydear's no water and no stirring method.



In the video I mentioned above he does use distilled water and a nylon pastry brush.............check it out.

bobwonderbuns Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 4:14pm

Ah!! I knew I heard it somewhere! icon_lol.gif

moydear77 Posted 4 Feb 2010 , 8:14pm

It will melt, trust me icon_smile.gif Just start it on low heat. The water just makes the process all the longer. You have to cook out whatever moisture you are adding. Moisture and Sugar or altered sugar in this case are not a good match icon_smile.gif
If you are adding color, do this right away as well. If you are using water based gel, it will cook the moisture out as well.

summernoelle Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 5:13am

Great! Thank you everyone for the info!

BlakesCakes Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 5:36am

Getting Isomalt to a point where it can be poured can be done with or without water.

Ewald Notter cooks it on the stove, adding enough water to cover the isomalt and make it the consistency of wet sand. Yes, it takes longer, but the thought behind it is that just a small amount of moisture left in the product (8-10%) makes it easier to pull and less likely to develop small stress cracks.

I've seen BKeith Ryder do it both ways--in the microwave. The isomalt cooked with the water seems to tolerate re-heating and re-working much better.

Venuance pearls are pre-prepared isomalt (already cooked and colored). When I was at Albert Uster taking the sugar class, I came away with the understanding that they were made to retain a small amount of moisture so that they can be quickly and evenly melted.

I think a little water makes the product more forgiving, but yes, it does add some time to the process. Distilled water is a wonderful idea. The minerals and chemicals in various water supplies can wreak havoc with isomalt.

Nice info here (and the book by Vi Wittington is very nice, too):

http://www.countrykitchensa.com/whatshot/hotmain.aspx

Dominic's info on the making a bottle mold tutorial is great, too.

HTH
Rae

moydear77 Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 5:54am

I have seen Notter do it a couple of different ways. I found that in humid states like Oklahoma, My students had to take Venuance up to temp or they would start to weep.

summernoelle Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 4:10pm

I am in Colorado and there is 0 humidity here. I think I am going to add just a little bit of water. Off to the cake store!

Rosie2 Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 6:12pm

I tried Isomalt last night for the first time and it was a disaster...it came out cloudy and I could see tiny bubbles icon_cry.gif I followed the recipe from Global Sugar Art and it doesn't say anything about not stirring or using a strainer icon_sad.gif
The recipe doesn't say for how long to cook it just says to bring it to 320 and I did but it took a long time maybe around 1/2 an hour ---(??)
I don't know what I did wrong icon_cry.gif

moydear77 Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 7:46pm

If you are casting, the amount of water is not really an issue because you are not pulling it. If you stir, you will have more bubbles. Let sit after it has come to temperature. In my classes, I tell all my students to take it to 330*

Rosie2
What is the recipe?

BlakesCakes Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 10:22pm

Rosie, don't throw it away--remember, you can try to re-heat it and you may get a better result the second time.

If not, you can still "play" with it when it's not perfect. After awhile, it won't work well after re-heating, but you can get some use out of it.

Rae

Rosie2 Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 11:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by moydear77

If you are casting, the amount of water is not really an issue because you are not pulling it. If you stir, you will have more bubbles. Let sit after it has come to temperature. In my classes, I tell all my students to take it to 330*

Rosie2
What is the recipe?


Thank you Moydear, here's the recipe I found it in Global Sugar Art.

1 cup Isomalt

4 Tablespoons Hot Water

Liquid food coloring as desired

Combine Isomalt and water in a 1 quart heavy saucepan. Cook over medium heat while stirring with a wooden spoon until dissolved. Dip a pastry brush in water and wash down the sides to prevent crystallizing. Insert a candy thermometer to monitor temperature. You may have to wash down the sides with water one or two more times. Cook until mixture reaches 320 degrees and remove from heat. The syrup is VERY HOT! Take precautions to prevent burns.

When syrup stops bubbling, slowly add flavoring and food coloring if desired. Prepare your molds by spraying them with Pam or lightly oiling them. Pour hot syrup into molds and allow to harden 10 minutes. Unmold onto waxed paper. If the weather is humid, wrap in candy bags to prevent the candy from becoming cloudy.

The use of a candy funnel will make this job much easier. Please remember that large candies can be a choking hazard


I followed it exactly.

Rosie2 Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 11:16pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Rosie, don't throw it away--remember, you can try to re-heat it and you may get a better result the second time.

If not, you can still "play" with it when it's not perfect. After awhile, it won't work well after re-heating, but you can get some use out of it.

Rae


Hi Rae, ohhhh I didin't know you could re-heat it...and I almost threw it away last night. Thank you!! I'll go home and play with it icon_smile.gif

Kitagrl Posted 5 Feb 2010 , 11:30pm

I need to make a glass slipper in a couple months...where did you get the mold for it?

summernoelle Posted 6 Feb 2010 , 3:44am

I am making a mold. I found a plastic one that isn't suitable for sugar use-only chocolate. So I am making a model from clay, and then a mold from silicone from that.

I am planning on casting that either Monday or Tuesday, so I'll let you know how it goes. I have already had 2 failed attempts, but I am determined to get it to work. icon_smile.gif

Kitagrl Posted 6 Feb 2010 , 3:47am

cool! (Hey if it goes well will you sell me one? haha...)

Can't wait to see it!!!! I was just looking into shoe molds and not very successful so far...

BlakesCakes Posted 6 Feb 2010 , 3:58am

Don't know how big the shoe needs to be, but this looks promising:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260281241785&rvr_id=&crlp=1_263602_263622&UA=%3F*I8&GUID=21168f9b1260a0b58305ce75fff783c0&itemid=260281241785&ff4=263602_263622

Rae

summernoelle Posted 6 Feb 2010 , 5:13pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

cool! (Hey if it goes well will you sell me one? haha...)

Can't wait to see it!!!! I was just looking into shoe molds and not very successful so far...




Ha ha-I have to see how it turns out. I'm not super confident it will. icon_smile.gif

Rosie2 Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 8:28am

Okay, I tried again with isomalt and the sugar diamond turned yellow icon_cry.gif I'm beginning to hate isomalt icon_mad.gif

summernoelle Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 3:57pm

Rosie-there were some suggestions on the home page tutorial-a lot of things that can turn it yellow. Read through them and see if any of them applied to you. icon_smile.gif I

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