Cake Serving Sizes

Decorating By kellikrause Updated 1 Feb 2010 , 11:42pm by kellikrause

kellikrause Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 8:03pm
post #1 of 8

I know somewhere there has got to be a more realistic guide for cake serving sizes! Anyone.....please help me!

I don't think a 8 in round should be cut into 20 servings! Am I the only one? Here, would you like a crumb of cake?

Thanks!

7 replies
bashini Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 8:44pm
post #2 of 8

Hi, according to my portion guide, an 8" round will give you 20 servings. But here is Earlene's portion guide.

http://www.earlenescakes.com/ckserchart.htm

HTH. icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 9:12pm
post #3 of 8

How are you cutting the cake? No you couldn't get 20 wedges out of it, but 20 1x2x4-5in pieces are an nice size of cake.

Have you baked this size and cut 20 servings from it?

I use wedding servings for all my cakes, no matter the occasion.

indydebi Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 9:20pm
post #4 of 8

"Realistic" guide? icon_confused.gif

A serving size is a pre-determined way to figure your pricing. The client can take that 8" round cake and cut it in half and serve it with two forks for all I care, but they are paying for the 24 servings it's designed to serve.

If their family eats like Jethro Bodine, then they need to buy a bigger cake. If you are providing larger than normal servings, then your price-per-serving needs to be bigger since they are getting more cake per serving.

I might order a sack of "6 orders of fries" but I'll pay more if the fries are large, as opposed to small, simply because a large order of fries costs more than a small order of fries ..... because there are more fries in the bag.

A can of Campbell's soup (the small can) says it will serve 2.5 people. Over my big 'ole white hind end, it will! icon_surprised.gif But I KNOW I eat more than what they determine a serving to be, so I buy more cans of soup.

There's a difference between the piece of cake we eat in front of the TV at midnight, and a piece of cake we eat for dessert at a wedding or a dinner.

People tend to hear "one inch" and they think "paper thin". It's not.

Here's a pic of a 1x2x4" piece of cake. A nice dessert size piece of cake.
http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1156785 and
http:[email protected]/3856884667/

What I tell folks when they bought an 8" round is, "This cake will serve 15-20, depending on how you cut it. The price is $xx.xx." I don't go into price-per-serving blah blah blah because bluntly, the customer only wants to know "how many does it feed and how much does it cost."

Renaejrk Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 9:29pm
post #5 of 8

Indydebi - you are awesome

The_Lil_Cakehouse Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 9:39pm
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

"Realistic" guide? icon_confused.gif


What I tell folks when they bought an 8" round is, "This cake will serve 15-20, depending on how you cut it. The price is $xx.xx." I don't go into price-per-serving blah blah blah because bluntly, the customer only wants to know "how many does it feed and how much does it cost."




That's how I say my servings are, I use the party serving as my low and the wedding serving as my high and then quote a price, I don't go into the price per slice, and then I have "a standard serving size is x-x"

prterrell Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 9:41pm
post #7 of 8

8" round will give 24 1"x2"x4" servings. That is NOT a crumb of cake! That is 8 cubic inches of cake. Plenty of cake.

kellikrause Posted 1 Feb 2010 , 11:42pm
post #8 of 8

thanks ladies!! I understand now...we are cutting cubes, not wedges. I automatically think wedges when it comes to round. Thank you so much for sharing.

Indydebi- thanks for the pictures, it helped a lot!!

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