Guaranteed Tactic To Make A Sell?

Business By MissCakeCrazy Updated 31 Jan 2010 , 7:38am by adventuregal

MissCakeCrazy Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 11:17am
post #1 of 15

I have received a few queries by brides in the past and after quoting them, they have found it too much and haven't gotten back to me. I do not quote too much, I know the market and how much cakes cost in the UK. The thing is, do any of you experienced cake makers have a sure way to win a customer?

14 replies
indydebi Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 12:35pm
post #2 of 15

Do you find out their budget and pricing expectations at the beginning, before you even talk cake or design?

matthewkyrankelly Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 1:06pm
post #3 of 15

Sales of anything is about educating the consumer. The things you need to find out are: budget, style, design, flavors, etc. I find that the best way to do this is to spend about five minutes asking conversational questions about all of these things. Then LISTEN CAREFULLY. Keep a check list at first.

You are the expert and may need to educate the customer about current pricing or what's "in" (or not!) depending on what the customer tells you. Take it from me, if you explain why a cake is expensive, a customer may change their budget on the spot. Also, if you take a few minutes with the customer to educate them about how a cake is crafted, you will become the expert in their mind. When they go to someone else and see that your pricing wasn't crazy, there's a good chance they'll be back.

Become an ambassador for cakes. Teach people about the process. This will show your passion for what you do. People will buy your cakes. Price isn't the bottom line.

leah_s Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 1:23pm
post #4 of 15

Well, quoting a price via email, or over the phone is a sure way to lose the sale. Get them in for a consultation, sketch a design that they fall in love with and let them eat your cake. Then ask for the sale.

Without a taste and a design they have no idea what they're buying. Really would you call an auto dealer and ask, "How much does a car cost?" The dealer would want to know what brand, what model, what options, what color? Once you fall in love with the car, then it's "What can do we to make a deal right now?"

There's a show on US TV called "Say Yes to the Dress." It is the BEST sample of selling in the wedding biz.

MissCakeCrazy Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 4:41pm
post #5 of 15

The usual thing that happens is, a bride e-mails me with a picture or specifications about what she wants and for how many people. sometimes they just say they definitely want 3 tiers (regardless of the number of people). I then tell her how much it will cost. She then tells me its alot over her budget (the budget is usually half of the quote of the cake). I offer to try to lessen the price by changing the cake design according to her budget or lessening the number of tiers. I never hear from them again....

matthewkyrankelly Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 5:50pm
post #6 of 15

You need to answer the question "Why are you better than a cake I can get for half of your price?"

You need to know the answer. You need to believe the answer. You need to express confidence in your answer. You need to be firm in your pricing. As soon as you say "Let's make a deal!" they confirm in their minds that you might be screwing around on the price.

rainbow_kisses Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 5:55pm
post #7 of 15

I have to say I never give any information via email as it seems the customer just does not absorb the information.
If they make an enquiery via email I ask them for a telephone number and give them a call to talk through the details and encourage them to take a personal consultation.

Always find out what they are wanting to pay before even telling them a price as most of the time their initial budget is going to be how much they can buy it at M&S or Asda. Then I explain to them that by buying a custom cake they can get a huge selection of flavours and hand crafted design. Then when I have wetted their appetite with flavours I get them to a tasting with the groom. Only after all of this will I mention a costing. 95% of the time I get a sale icon_biggrin.gif

cylstrial Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 6:30pm
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Well, quoting a price via email, or over the phone is a sure way to lose the sale. Get them in for a consultation, sketch a design that they fall in love with and let them eat your cake. Then ask for the sale.

Without a taste and a design they have no idea what they're buying. Really would you call an auto dealer and ask, "How much does a car cost?" The dealer would want to know what brand, what model, what options, what color? Once you fall in love with the car, then it's "What can do we to make a deal right now?"

There's a show on US TV called "Say Yes to the Dress." It is the BEST sample of selling in the wedding biz.




Leah - I like your new picture!

leah_s Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 6:38pm
post #9 of 15

Aw, thanks. I went yesterday morning to a "quick" photography studio for new head shots.

MissCakeCrazy Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 7:04pm
post #10 of 15

scrummymummy, you make it sound so simple. If you ask them at the beginning how much they are willing to spend, how are you going to go over their budget talking about your designs without them walking out the door? Also, you said that you arrange a tasting aswell with the groom, does this mean you have 2 appontments? How do you find your customers by the way?

loriemoms Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 9:23pm
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

Well, quoting a price via email, or over the phone is a sure way to lose the sale. Get them in for a consultation, sketch a design that they fall in love with and let them eat your cake. Then ask for the sale.

Without a taste and a design they have no idea what they're buying. Really would you call an auto dealer and ask, "How much does a car cost?" The dealer would want to know what brand, what model, what options, what color? Once you fall in love with the car, then it's "What can do we to make a deal right now?"

There's a show on US TV called "Say Yes to the Dress." It is the BEST sample of selling in the wedding biz.



Leah - I like your new picture!




I was going to say the same thing! Great photo!!!

DDiva Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 9:43pm
post #12 of 15

Wow-it's interesting how different tactics work for each of us! Probably 90% of my business is done by email and phone...and I have a storefront. I don't think it matters as much where you make the sale, but HOW you make the sale. If you're a good communicator, you're a good communicator.

I've had total strangers who had never tasted my cake SWEAR to someone that my cake was delicious!! They were convinced because I was convincing when we talked.

So if there's a thread of advice in this: nothing GUARANTEES a sale, but self confidence can make a sale everytime. If you believe, others will.

rainbow_kisses Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 10:55pm
post #13 of 15

Most of my customers come from word of mouth. (but my main job is as an events and wedding planner)I do tend to have two consultations as the first is usually just the bride and maybe a friend or mum and usually happens in a relaxed environment like a cafe as I work from home and so does my DH.So making a tasting with the groom, as it is his cake to, tends to be a bit more pressing.

When a bride says that her budget is about £150 and she has been looking at M&S or a supermarket cake with extra bits off ebay icon_lol.gif I do mention that they are just a run of the mill spongecake or fruit cake with no effort going into them when for £250 she could have a cake that she designed to serve her 50 guests (thinking 2 tier here). and then she can choose two different flavors and that she could cut back on the dessert side of the food.Then her budget shifts a little bit.

If she is getting into the design side then you suggest it can be a centre piece of her wedding reception which gets her thinking less on the balloons and banner that she had in mind and this can increase her budget by another £100. So she could now start looking at a £350 cake.


Can you tell I have a degree in phycology icon_lol.gif

MissCakeCrazy Posted 30 Jan 2010 , 9:17am
post #14 of 15

I'll keep that it mind icon_smile.gif

adventuregal Posted 31 Jan 2010 , 7:38am
post #15 of 15

I agree with some of the repliers...really impress them with the skills you know you have...its not just a "cake" its a one of a kind, personalized piece of art. Explain the care you take and the luxury ingredients if you add them...explain if you are environmentally concious while baking (thats big right now in my area)...explain all the flavor/personalized options that aren't always readily available elsewhere...give them the run down and be proud of your work! Confidence will carry over into the client. It is always best to consult if you can as well that way you can seduce them with your flavors!!! icon_biggrin.gif

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