Lemon Curd As A Filling

Decorating By kjskid Updated 28 Jan 2010 , 7:16pm by jennicita

kjskid Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 7:43pm
post #1 of 42

I want to put lemon curd in the filling of my lemon cake. A few questions:
1 - does it have to be refrigerated?
2 - do I need to put down a thin layer of buttercream so it doesn't soak into the cakes and make them soggy?
3 - will it be too lemony? Should I stick with just buttercream?

Thanks!

41 replies
prterrell Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 7:49pm
post #2 of 42

1 - does it have to be refrigerated?
No.

2 - do I need to put down a thin layer of buttercream so it doesn't soak into the cakes and make them soggy?
No. Lemon curd is VERY thick. It will not soak into the cake at all.

3 - will it be too lemony? Should I stick with just buttercream?
Depends on what your definition of "too lemony" is. Lemon curd has a bright, strong lemon flavor. I could eat it with a spoon. I fill most of my lemon cakes with it and use lemon buttercream, too!

icer101 Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 7:52pm
post #3 of 42

i agree with everything prterrell said.. delicious!!

Mike1394 Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 8:24pm
post #4 of 42

I thought lemon curd had to refridgerated.

Mike

prterrell Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 8:25pm
post #5 of 42

With it's high acid and sugar content, it should be fine out on the counter for a day or two. I've never had a problem with it in the past.

Mike1394 Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 8:29pm
post #6 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

With it's high acid and sugar content, it should be fine out on the counter for a day or two. I've never had a problem with it in the past.




I wouldn't take the risk. The sugar will not keep those eggs safe.

Mike

prterrell Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 8:35pm
post #7 of 42

I think we're gonna have to agree to disagree, Mike.

Mike1394 Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 8:39pm
post #8 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

I think we're gonna have to agree to disagree, Mike.




icon_biggrin.gif Me thinks so too

vagostino Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 8:49pm
post #9 of 42

I've heard that lemon curd needs to be refrigerated as well. I would love for this to be true since I have a wedding that wants lemon filling.

Is there any source online that can confirm or deny this? I'm searching now and I can't find any official source.

I bet a lot of people have not refrigerated lemon curd successfully but it only takes one bad batch to cause a disaster.

vagostino Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 8:51pm
post #10 of 42

Well here you go...for all of you wandering about lemon curd...it doesn't get any more technical than this!

http://class.fst.ohio-state.edu/fst696/Problems/lemoncurd-fina-%20report.html

2SchnauzerLady Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 8:57pm
post #11 of 42

I've done lemon curd filling between 2 very thin layers of white chocolate buttercream on a lemon cake - yummy! I have put it between layers without the BC and it did soak in - but it wasn't soggy, there was just an area of cake and lemon curd yumminess between the layers of cake! It was more like a filling than anything else. I did not refridgerate, and it was fine. I admit, I did not look anywhere on line to see if it would be fine. I treated it the same as any jam or jelly that I've used between layers since it came in a glass jar like jams and jellies.

prterrell Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 9:03pm
post #12 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by vagostino

Well here you go...for all of you wandering about lemon curd...it doesn't get any more technical than this!

http://class.fst.ohio-state.edu/fst696/Problems/lemoncurd-fina-%20report.html




Well, there you go then! I guess I was wrong (hey, I *can* admit it, contrary to popular belief! icon_lol.gif ). I must confess I've only ever used the stuff from the jar and didn't realize the eggs were in greater proportion than the lemon juice.

So, refrigerate. But, even so, it should be fine out for a couple hours at a wedding.

Would you agree with that, Mike?

mkolmar Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 9:06pm
post #13 of 42

I thought it had to be in the fridge. After looking at that technical link it says to refrigerate also. It's more towards the bottom by the summary. Was an interesting read though.

vagostino Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 9:28pm
post #14 of 42

This is what they told me at cooking school regarding temperature danger zone:

The temperature danger zone is the temperature at which bacteria multiply rapidly. The temperature is from 40 degree Fahrenheit to 140 degree Fahrenheit. Foods should not be allowed to stay in this temperature zone for more than 2 hours (1 hour on a very hot day).

So...this is a very conservative range. I guess If a cake is out of the fridge and consumed within two hours it won;t even be in the temperature danger zone that much because by the time that evil lemon curd reaches the dangerous temperature it will need some time to warm up.

Mike1394 Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 11:38pm
post #15 of 42

Well, LOLOL Most of it flew by my senile old head. Don't cook your curd to 170. Unless you want lemon flavored scrambled eggs icon_biggrin.gif

Mike

vagostino Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 11:57pm
post #16 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

Well, LOLOL Most of it flew by my senile old head. Don't cook your curd to 170. Unless you want lemon flavored scrambled eggs icon_biggrin.gif

Mike




oh no no ....i meant that is the temperature range where bacteria grows when food is sitting out...so it means don;t have the cake or any other finished food product at a temperature between 40 and 140 degrees for more than two hours. that's why foods that are meant to be eaten cold have to be at a 40 degree temp in salad bars for example, and foods that need to be eaten hot at temp above 140. (like soups etc).
This is only for perishable foods (in this case the concern is the eggs in the lemon curd).

LaBellaFlor Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 11:58pm
post #17 of 42

Yeah, that was too much science for me and I don't cdare what it says. Mike your my man, but I disagree with you as well. I'vr had it out up to 3 days, many times, and nothing has ever happened.

Loucinda Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 12:03am
post #18 of 42

OK - I must not have a scientific mind, because the way I read it, it was stable up to 7 days, then it would grow stuff???? icon_confused.gif

LaBellaFlor Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 2:19am
post #19 of 42

Well there you go. I'm going with what Loucinda read. icon_biggrin.gif

Renaejrk Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 2:43am
post #20 of 42

confusing

Sagebrush Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 4:52am
post #21 of 42

I made a cake recently... coconut cake, lemon curd as the filling and coconut frosting (YUM!... all recipes from this site, btw). I would definitely say it was not too lemony.

Lemon curd is pretty close the the lemon part of lemon meringue pie. If you don't find that too lemony, then you would definitely not find lemon curd as a filling in the cake too lemony, as it's a much thinner layer.

Mike1394 Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 5:43am
post #22 of 42

The way I read it was the 7 days was in an unopened container.

Mike

kimblyd Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 6:21am
post #23 of 42

I have in my hand a brand new, unopened jar of Dickinson's lemon curd. The label says "Best if used by Dec 26, 2010" and "Refrigerate after opening".

I am confused. If it will last that long in the refrigerator it has to have added preservatives, correct? Wouldn't those preservatives help keep it more stable when it is in a cake at room temperature as well?

I use this lemon curd to fill my (hobby) lemon cakes and have let them sit out for several hours, sometimes even overnight, with no ill effects. Have I just been lucky so far?

Not arguing, just wondering. icon_confused.gif

Kim

LaBellaFlor Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 6:27am
post #24 of 42

I don't think my home made lemon curd will last that long, but it is fine sitting out over night. So maybe we've both been lucky. icon_wink.gif

mrsc808 Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 6:38am
post #25 of 42

This makes me want to whip up some lemon curd and try it myself. Of course, I also want to eat some lemon cake so that could be the reason...

Mike1394 Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 8:20am
post #26 of 42

Kim, that date is not meant as if you opened it today, and it would still be good in Dec.

LBF, I think it would have to do with not being open to air. I think that's why in a frosted cake you'll have some leeway.

Mike

jennicita Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 10:41am
post #27 of 42

These are the key statements in my opinion:

"The microbiological shelf stability results suggested that the lemon curd incubated at 25° C and 37 ° C was susceptible at 7 days to mold contamination once the jar was opened (see Table 4.6)."

>>>This is room temperature with mold contamination at 7 days after opening. 3-4 days shouldn't be a big problem.

"The high concentration of sugar in the product and the low pH in combination could play a key role on the prevention of bacterial growth in the product."

>>>In other words, it takes a while for bacterial growth to start due to the sugar and pH level. Also meaning that it's not too sensitive.

"In summary, the best solutions for this product are to use sodium benzoate at a level of 0.1% and include the instructions "refrigerate after opening" on the package to assure microbiological stability of the product over the desired shelf life. "

>>>So using the additive and refrigerating after opening will ensure stability over the desired shelf life...probably much, much longer than the 3-4 days a cake lasts at my house.

According to this report, it sounds like a few days out of the fridge are not going to be a problem. I certainly haven't had any problems since I started using it.

jenny

jennicita Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 10:52am
post #28 of 42

Correction: 25-37 is actually between room temperature and body temperature. I currently keep my apartment at around 22.

MikeRowesHunny Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 11:38am
post #29 of 42

The commercial stuff has an additive to retard bacterial growth (see the post above), so I would have no qualms about filling a wedding cake with this on Thursday that will be kept at room temperature until Saturday - in fact I have many, many times with no issues (I don't refridgerate ANY cakes, so I have to be happy that they are safe at room temp for several days!). Homemade curd, not so much, that I wouldn't take the chance on. Just buy the best commercial curd you can afford and fill away icon_wink.gif!

psurrette Posted 28 Jan 2010 , 12:17pm
post #30 of 42

We all must be too young to remember...............

Eggs never use to be refirdaraters years ago when they were at the grocery store. They sat out for many days. Yes we have come a long way in learning what is good or bad. I say it can be left out.

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