Aaaawww Geez...first Sheet Cake Order..no Clue.

Decorating By pinky73 Updated 30 Jan 2010 , 1:16am by Donnabugg

pinky73 Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 8:26pm
post #1 of 13

I have a friend that has asked me to make two cakes for her in-law's 25th wedding anniversary party. One being a regular german chocolate and the other a good ol white wedding cake with raspberry filling. I have made a few cakes before, even a couple REALLY simple stacked wedding cakes with truly pathetic and embarrassing looking buttercream roses..but people loved them, including this friend of mine. She sent me the pic today of the wedding cake, just a flat sheet cake with some white buttercream rosebuds and a shell border. My question is about filling this cake...do you cut the single layer in half, fill with rasberry and then decorate as desired or do you make two sheet cakes and stack them with the filling in between the two layers? Any tips on how to keep either the skinny halves or the full sized layers from breaking or falling apart as I'm trying to stack them over the filling? The largest thing I've stacked was a 10" round...this seems like more room for error. I will be using my trusty WASC cake. Here's to hoping this isn't a dismal failure.

12 replies
j_arney Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 8:29pm
post #2 of 13

You could do it either way. But you're right, moving a thin layer would be harder. I don't have any tips for doing it well. I don't make many sheet cakes either. If she needs a lot of servings, you could just do to sheet cakes and fill in between.

prterrell Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 8:51pm
post #3 of 13

I technically don't do sheet cakes, as all of my rectangular cakes are 2-layers, totaling 4" height, with filing. It is MUCH easier. As a bonus, a 2-layer rectangular cake will feed twice as many as a single layer of the same size!

Darthburn Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 8:51pm
post #4 of 13

You could torte the sheet, then slide a thin metal / plastic / cardboard piece all the way between the 2 layers (they make stainless cake seperator mover things that are thin and flat) letting the weight of the cake rest on the seperator. Then pick the seperator up and move out of the way. Add your filling to the bottom half, then slide the top back on to the cake from the seperator.

Does that make any sense? I hope it does. basically it's like putting a thin cookie sheet between them and lifting the top piece off with it so that it's one piece... supported. It'll keep it from breaking up or being picked up unevenly.

debster Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 9:23pm
post #5 of 13

I do sheet cakes all the time.How large does it have to be? Either take 2 9x13's and lay them side by side and cut in half and fill or if you want it thicker add one cake on the other. Or take 2 11 x 15's or 12x18's and do the side by side thing. When you do them like this it's easier to lift with a cookie sheet or I have a large metal paddle thing I use.

It's not as bad as you think it is just don't fear. If you don't want the cake as large double the layers , if you want it large I go to home depot and they cut my boards from plywood. I get like 4 LARGE cake boards for the price of a sheet of plywood. They cut it for free. Check under my wedding cakes there was a sheet cake that served 150. I've done them under my sports cakes for that many people too. It's really not bad. Good luck!!!!

I have to laugh I was the person that freaked over doing stacked cakes cause all people want in my area are sheet cakes. They are coming around though.

pinky73 Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 5:46pm
post #6 of 13

Thank you to everyone who gave their advice...I appreciate it! I have decided to make two sheets and stack them for a 4" high cake. I'm just not experienced enough to be splitting a cake into 1" sheets! LOL My friend has no preferences in this regard, she just wants something that tastes good and somewhat resembles a rectangle....with a few little flowers on the top. (thank goodness!) I do like the plywood idea...that's really bright...and I'm going to the hardware store after work to get my new boards.
Again, thank you all for the great advice. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

Kiddiekakes Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 5:52pm
post #7 of 13

Here's how I move my layers.....If I am cutting a 2 inch cake (Torting) then I use a flat standard size sheet cardboard and slip it in between the layer after I cut it.Then lift it off.After I fill the middle I lift the cardboard overtop the cake and gently nudge the torted cake forward to the edge of the board and once it is near there I can gently slide it off onto the other half.Now if you are adding another layer instead then you are also adding servings so make sure you calculate for that.I do the same for adding a layer.Never broken a cake yet!HTH

Darthburn Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 5:54pm
post #8 of 13

There you go... that's how I was trying to explain it. Well done Kiddiekakes. icon_smile.gif

matthewkyrankelly Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 6:03pm
post #9 of 13

Save your sanity. Freeze the layers before you stack them. They will thaw in minutes, but will be so much easier to handle while you are layering the cake.

kimblyd Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 6:06pm
post #10 of 13

Also when torting a 2" sheet cake, it helps to start with a cold cake.

I slide my top layer off onto a cookie sheet as described above and put it in the freezer while I fill the cake and do a little cleanup.

I take it out and put it back on the cake and it is usually firm enough to adjust it easily without breaking the cake.

sulia Posted 29 Jan 2010 , 6:33pm
post #11 of 13

hi

i simply cut my sheet cake in half, torte and fill both halves and finally fit them together again. (working with half a cake is so much easier. ) then i just ice the whole cake as normal. the join is completely covered. all the sheet cakes in my pics are done that way.

good luck.

Donnabugg Posted 30 Jan 2010 , 1:15am
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by matthewkyrankelly

Save your sanity. Freeze the layers before you stack them. They will thaw in minutes, but will be so much easier to handle while you are layering the cake.




Ahh, great idea!

Donnabugg Posted 30 Jan 2010 , 1:16am
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by matthewkyrankelly

Save your sanity. Freeze the layers before you stack them. They will thaw in minutes, but will be so much easier to handle while you are layering the cake.




Ahh, great idea!

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