Spackle Under Fondant?

Decorating By Mug-a-Bug Updated 27 Jan 2010 , 4:57pm by ruthi

Mug-a-Bug Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 2:36am
post #1 of 20

I'm about to get my hands back in some fondant icon_rolleyes.gif

I'm a recent fan of spackle under bc. Can I use spackle under fondant? Do I need a crumbcoat over that? Thanks for reading icon_biggrin.gif

19 replies
Elise87 Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 4:57am
post #2 of 20

I had read a post on here a little while ago about spackle and so would also like to know the answer to your question too

If it has a very fine crumb and is not lumpy and feels just like icing when you eat it can you just put fondant straight ontop of it? Or do you still need a thin coat of buttercream to help smooth it?......Is that what you mean?
Sorry i'm still learning about cake spackle lol

agconner Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 5:31am
post #3 of 20

Ok you have my attention, what is cake spackle? I have never heard of this, and if it is something to help me get my cakes smoother I would LOVE to know what it is and just how you do it. Thanks in advance!!!

Elise87 Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 5:33am
post #4 of 20
agconner Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 5:52am
post #5 of 20

So pretty much you just mix your cake scraps with some buttercream and then ice the cake? What a great idea. So gonna try this on my next cake this friday!!

Elise87 Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 5:53am
post #6 of 20

yeh i think that's pretty much it lol I want to try and just ice with that under fondant cose it sounds really yummy and something different to just buttercream lol

agconner Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 5:57am
post #7 of 20

I would think if it is smooth then you could just put the fondant right on top of it no problem. Since it has some buttercream in it I would think that the fondant would still stick to it. Maybe even try a thin thin thin coat of piping gel, so thin no one would even taste it, it help it stick. Wouldn't hurt to try.

DianeLM Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 3:43pm
post #8 of 20

I always use spackle under my fondant. Whenever possible, I pop my spackle-covered cake into the freezer for 30 minutes or more. It fills in every flaw (including uneven layers!) and makes applying fondant an absolute breeze. No need to add any more moisture. The fondant will stick to the bc in the spackle.

Peridot Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 4:18pm
post #9 of 20

When I use BC under fondant I put a a thin layer of BC - more than a crumb coat but not as thick as if I were just going to use BC for the finished product. How thick do you put on the spackle as I would like a little taste of BC.

DianeLM Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 4:22pm
post #10 of 20

The spackle goes on a little thicker than a crumb coat. Freezing prevents the spackle from shifting under the fondant during smoothing.

Peridot Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 4:29pm
post #11 of 20

Thanks DianeM.

I am doing a cake next weekend and I am going to try the spackling thing. It's chocolate so I hope I don't have a big mess and I will refrigerate or freeze for 30 minutes before I lay the fondant.

I keep shying away from ganache - chicken I guess. I tried it one time and it just seemed like so much sweetness and chocolate. So the spackle might be what I am looking for in a firm base for my fondant.

BakingJeannie Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 4:41pm
post #12 of 20

I have used spackle before when I have a lot of extra cake (got the idea from Toba Garrett's book), especially if you want nice sharp edges plus it taste great under the fondant.

Mix some SMBC with the cake trimming and apply to cake. I usually lightly crumb coat with butter cream; apply spackle; then a light layer of butter cream to smooth it out. This way you don't need to apply a thick layer of fondant.

Cheers!

sadsmile Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 4:54pm
post #13 of 20

Love Spackle it tastes amazing!!! I am going to use it to fill my daughters B-day cake. Tastes like cookies and cream if you use both vanilla and chocolate cake crumbs in vanilla butter cream. It's very sturdy but fork soft.

Edited to add.... make your butter cream on the thick side with less liquid or more powdered sugar and add in fine cake crumbs and you get peanut butter consistency that will smooth out nicely. If your Spackle has lumps just keep mixing till the lumps of cake crumbs break down more. Chill it and viva or sponge roller it while chilled and hard to make it more smooth.

LateBloomer Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 5:19pm
post #14 of 20

Thanks so much for all the info. I also have Toba's book but I have not tried the spackle yet. I'm definately going to give it a try. Thanks also for the pan release recipe. I don't like using the cooking sprays.

artscallion Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 5:44pm
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by agconner

So pretty much you just mix your cake scraps with some buttercream and then ice the cake?...




Cake scraps + buutercream + enough filling (jam/fruit filling/lemon curd/etc) to bind it all together and make it spreadable.

Mug-a-Bug Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 7:46pm
post #16 of 20

Thanks everyone!! I will def give it try on my next fondant cake. I love spackle... solves so many problems. thumbs_up.gif

ruthi Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 9:04pm
post #17 of 20

Great advice - Diane, does freezing the cake for a half hour cause any problems with condensation when applying the fondant? I used to put my cakes in the frig before putting on the fondant and sometimes I had real problems with condensation in summer weather....but I like the idea of having the spackle firm so that the fondant won't give any problems when applied, which is my other headache. Have you had any of these kind of problems? So far, the only time I haven't had a problem with the fondant is when I use ganache, but not every customer wants ganache...and then I'm back to the buttercream issues that I always get under fondant.

sadsmile Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 12:35am
post #18 of 20

anything coming from a cold environment into a warm one will sweat condensation. The trick is not to touch it and let it dry. Turn a fan on.

DianeLM Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 4:46pm
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruthi

Great advice - Diane, does freezing the cake for a half hour cause any problems with condensation when applying the fondant? I used to put my cakes in the frig before putting on the fondant and sometimes I had real problems with condensation in summer weather....but I like the idea of having the spackle firm so that the fondant won't give any problems when applied, which is my other headache. Have you had any of these kind of problems? So far, the only time I haven't had a problem with the fondant is when I use ganache, but not every customer wants ganache...and then I'm back to the buttercream issues that I always get under fondant.




No condensation problems whatsoever! That's why I love this technique - especially in the summer when I pretty much refuse to use buttercream.

The only interesting thing I've noticed is that sometimes the cake will be completely dry but still LOOK like it's sticky and wet in some areas. Eventually, that look goes away, but before I discovered the cake really was dry, I thought I had to wait much longer to start decorating.

The main point of the chilling, which I cannot stress enough, is that you are only chilling the outer inch or so of cake. The inside of the cake is still at room temperature. It's when the cake is chilled through and through that condensation becomes a problem.

Regarding ganache under fondant, I personally find it to be far more work and expense than necessary. Although you do have to plan for chill time with spackle, at least you don't have to start the project 2 days in advance!

ruthi Posted 27 Jan 2010 , 4:57pm
post #20 of 20

Thanks Diane - so correct me if I got this wrong - you said that after you spackle you pop it in the freezer for half hour and then cover with fondant, right? and you don't have to put ANYTHING on that "frozen" outer layer of spackle for the fondant to stick? No brushing a syrup or extra BC? It sticks to the "frozen" fondant???? Pardon my worries, I have had so many problems with fondant even though I use it exclusively, and I REALLY want to get a foolproof method and yours sounds ideal....and I agree, the ganache is much more expensive and time-consuming and not very easy to work with, IMO.

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