Best Medium For Making Decorated Display Cookies?

Baking By Cakepro Updated 25 Jan 2010 , 8:25pm by prterrell

Cakepro Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 11:08pm
post #1 of 12

Hi all ~

I need to make some decorated cookies to put on plates on display in my bakery.

I made a recipe of salt dough (2 c flour, 1 c salt, 1 c water) which worked great for rolling and cutting out the cookies, but they baked badly (puffy and lumpy). I baked them at 200 degrees F for half an hour or so, per the instructions on a salt dough ornament web site.

Does anyone have any better suggestions or recipe for long-lasting, FLAT display cookies that aren't real cookies?

Thanks!!
Sherri

11 replies
endymion Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 11:38pm
post #2 of 12

Could you use Scuply clay or something similar? Not sure if it would work...

(Or maybe that Crayola magic clay stuff?)

bobwonderbuns Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 11:55pm
post #3 of 12

Salt dough cookies. They look real and last forever. icon_biggrin.gif

verono Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 12:14am
post #4 of 12

Why not just use regular sugar cookies? They will dry and look great for a while ! My brother still have one of my cookies that I made two years ago!

Cakepro Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 2:41am
post #5 of 12

I already tried salt dough with poor results.

I was hoping someone had a tried-and-true salt dough recipe and baking instructions so that the salt dough cookies don't have irregular, puffy surfaces. icon_smile.gif

Lcubed82 Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 5:33am
post #6 of 12

I stopped at a local baker that was opening a new shop. I asked about cookies, and they got out a huge box of real cookies, decorated, that were bagged and sealed. From what they said, they had had those samples for a while, and they still looked great!

antonia74 Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 7:29am
post #7 of 12

I use real ones that are individually bagged. I've had some for 5-7 years and they are just fine for display purposes.

(Just keep them out of hot, direct sunlight....or the icing colours will fade and white turns a patchy ivory after a long time.)

prterrell Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 8:02am
post #8 of 12

Antonia, how about doing them out of homemade playdough (which is basically a salt dough)? You'd have to let them air dry, not bake.

I don't have a copy of the recipe my mom always made for us. I'll email her for it, but it could take a few days.

In the meantime, here's a link that has 10 different recipes: http://tipnut.com/10-homemade-playdough-recipes/

TracyLH Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 2:38pm
post #9 of 12

My father-in-law has his Father's Day Cookies mounted in a shadow box in his workshop from a few years ago and my mother-in-law has several displayed on a shelf from quite some time ago. I have some that I made a few years ago as well. They are all heat-sealed, kept out of direct sunlight and have had no color fading or other issues. You might want to do real cookies. Just my thought.

pbeckwith Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 3:15pm
post #10 of 12

My sister still has a wedding cookie from our niece's wedding 5 years ago. We did regular sugar cookie, used Toba's glace, then royal trim and flowers on that - all bagged with a ribbon closure. It looks great.

antonia74 Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 3:15pm
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Antonia, how about doing them out of homemade playdough (which is basically a salt dough)? You'd have to let them air dry, not bake.

I don't have a copy of the recipe my mom always made for us. I'll email her for it, but it could take a few days.

In the meantime, here's a link that has 10 different recipes: http://tipnut.com/10-homemade-playdough-recipes/




Those recipes look like fun...but wouldn't the regular icings we use react poorly to the extreme salt content in the cookies?

prterrell Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 8:25pm
post #12 of 12

I don't see why they would.

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