Buttercream, Icing...???

Baking By heleen61 Updated 24 Jan 2010 , 8:39pm by _Jamie_

heleen61 Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 10:30pm
post #1 of 17

I am a dutch girl and addicted by making cakes.

In holland we use a kind of buttercream to put on a cake before we put fondant on it.

This buttercream is not hard enough I think, because the cake does not become very smooth, with nice edges. icon_cry.gif

I found a lot of video's where people use nice white stuff before covering with fondant.

I tried to find out, at this forum, what it is, but I am not sure.
There are so many terms used, that I don't know.

What is the best to cover a cake with, to become sharp edges, before using fondant?

And is there a recipe fot it here?

Thanks for your help!!!!

16 replies
JGMB Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 10:44pm
post #2 of 17

I don't use fondant, but I did take a class in it once and we used Swiss Meringue Buttercream. It worked very well and tasted great. There are recipes for it on this website.

heleen61 Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 10:49pm
post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by JGMB

I don't use fondant, but I did take a class in it once and we used Swiss Meringue Buttercream. It worked very well and tasted great. There are recipes for it on this website.




Thanks a lot, I'll have a look thumbs_up.gif

pattycakesnj Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 10:54pm
post #4 of 17

also try ganache, either white chocolate or milk or dark chocolate under the fondant. I like how smooth you can get the ganache before applying fondant and it is not as sweet as buttercream. But you can also put crusting buttercream under your fondant and smooth it with Viva paper towel. All recipes and smoothing trick are here on CC.

Charmed Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 11:04pm
post #5 of 17

what kind of buttercream do you use usually? I mean what is your recipe? Just curious

heleen61 Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 11:16pm
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by charmed

what kind of buttercream do you use usually? I mean what is your recipe? Just curious




THis is what I usualy use:

1 : 1, butter and icing sugar

poohsmomma Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 12:53am
post #7 of 17

There is a great buttercream recipe here on CC that I love-Indydebi's buttercream. However it calls for Dream Whip, a powdered whipped topping mix, that might not be available where you live.

prterrell Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 5:46am
post #8 of 17

Have you ever made Italian Meringue Buttercream or Swiss Meringue Buttercream? OMG those are so good I could eat them with a spoon!

heleen61 Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 10:40am
post #9 of 17

I have made the SMC, and it was realy good.
The problem was that it was nog stiff enough for covering the fondant with a good result.
I use butter for these cremes, but I think you all use more crisco or trex...
Is that true?
Or dutch butter is different icon_rolleyes.gif

brincess_b Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 11:09am
post #10 of 17

the reason others butter cream is white is because.... it contains no butter!
most butters are natuarlly yellow - and although with a good creaming technique it will become paler, it will be yellow. (you can also get whitener - i forget what its called - superbright??????)

taste and texture will change if you use trex (int eh uk it is trex, crisco is the american brand), compared to butter. i dont really find it that different to work with.

do you add any liquid to your recipe? cause this is what changes the stiffness, and the results you can get.

make no mistake - it is DIFFICULT!!!! to get a perfect bc finish. lots of practice is the key to success. (also the fondant you use - some are easier to work with than others) (if you want to use SMBC, i think a lot of people refridgerate it to let them shape it a bit more)
xx

heleen61 Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 6:30pm
post #11 of 17

icon_biggrin.gif buttercream contains no butter icon_twisted.gif
In the Netherlands it is used a lot, but I am not satisfied with the result.
The colour is nog important, white, or light yellow, it is ok with me.
The point is, that it stays a bit stiff while covering the fondant.
I practise for a year now, but want it better... icon_rolleyes.gif thats me!
I keep practicing...

Thanks for all the answers given to me.

prterrell Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 6:33pm
post #12 of 17

Do you refrigerate the cake after getting perfectly smooth when icing with SMBC? Getting the butter in it to resolidify before applying the fondant is key.

heleen61 Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 6:37pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Do you refrigerate the cake after getting perfectly smooth when icing with SMBC? Getting the butter in it to resolidify before applying the fondant is key.




I do refrigerate the cake for many hours...

_Jamie_ Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 7:46pm
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by heleen61

Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Do you refrigerate the cake after getting perfectly smooth when icing with SMBC? Getting the butter in it to resolidify before applying the fondant is key.



I do refrigerate the cake for many hours...




That's the key. Fridge them till they are solid. Get nice sharp edges on them first, and chill chill chill till they're solid. Thin fondant applied immediately after removing from fridge will give you sharp lines. I use SMBC exclusively and do this everytime. I get great results this way.

mamawrobin Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 8:13pm
post #15 of 17

Do you keep your cakes refrigerated after fondant has been applied when they are iced with SMBC? I've never used SMBC and would really like to try it.

prterrell Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 8:21pm
post #16 of 17

I use IMBC, which is basically the same as SMBC and I only refrigerate cakes when they have a perishable filling or prior to transporting them.

_Jamie_ Posted 24 Jan 2010 , 8:39pm
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

I use IMBC, which is basically the same as SMBC and I only refrigerate cakes when they have a perishable filling or prior to transporting them.




Yep.

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