How To Do Piping On The Cake Side

Decorating By yanelymalave Updated 26 Jan 2010 , 8:37pm by Tee-Y

yanelymalave Posted 22 Jan 2010 , 5:33pm
post #1 of 9


I need HELP. I need to do the paisley shape cake as it was decorated in the Wilton's book. I never have done piping before on the side of the cakes. What I can do to use as a guidance? Is there any stencil available or does any have any good idea on how to do this?
I really appreciate all the help I can get


8 replies
prterrell Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 2:54am
post #2 of 9

You can lightly scratch a design into the icing using a toothpick and then pipe over that if you like. There are also pattern-presses for certain designs that you can purchase.

Elaine2581 Posted 23 Jan 2010 , 3:55am
post #3 of 9

One of the best tips I have read on this site regarding writing is to use a lazer level to beam a line across the cake to keep the writing straight. I've used it when writing on tops and sides of cakes. Just set the level on a can, a book, or whatever you can find to get it the right height. I have an easier time printing than writing in cursive. If you look at my pictures, I have several with writing; one very large one with lots of writing (a cake for my mother-in-law's 80th birthday. I set the cake on the edge of the counter and filled a small parchment paper triangle for the pastry bag. That way you can hold it almost like a pencil and have better control. On the 80th birthday cake and several with Bible verses, I printed out the message on the computer, measured and marked my cake with a toothpick just for spacing purposes. I didn't actually etch it into the icing. You can print and then copy on the reverse side of your paper with a VERY FINE line of piping gel or royal icing to give yourself a pattern to follow. Hope that helps some. If anything isn't clear, you can send me a PM and I'll try to clarify it.

denetteb Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 4:11am
post #4 of 9

Wilton has several pattern press sets, available at most Michaels, etc. You can pick which one or ones you like and then very lightly touch them to the surface to just leave a faint outline. You can place them orderly or random, however you would like. Then trace over them with your piping. Practice on the side of a cake pan till you are comfortable with piping on a vertical surface helps. Pipe, scrape off and repipe over and over again if you want. I also used a small paintbrush (like the size from a kids watercolor set) to gently nudge the piped lines around a bit if they were off a little. But others just free hand their scrolls also.

Tee-Y Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 4:30am
post #5 of 9

It would also be much easier if you had a tilting turntable you could use.That way your cake could be tilted at an angle comfortable for you to pipe on.

Lcubed82 Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 5:20am
post #6 of 9

Hang on tight if you use the Wilton tilting turntable. I dumped a couple of hours of basketweave on time when I unlocked the table to level it out. Thank goodness I actually had extra time, and had made some "next time" observations. Never thought the "next time" would start so soon!

leah_s Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 5:37am
post #7 of 9

Absolutely NO need for a tilting turntable (esp. the W one.) Just shove a bench scraper under the cake board to get some angle and pipe away.

prterrell Posted 25 Jan 2010 , 5:45am
post #8 of 9

I always do side work while sitting in a chair. Puts the cake sitting on the counter right at eye level.

Tee-Y Posted 26 Jan 2010 , 8:37pm
post #9 of 9

Well I don't know about the wilton turntable but I use the PME tilting turntable which comes with a non-slip mat and it works just fine for me.It makes side piping much easier and comfortable.

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